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Special Issue "Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Promotion: Moving Forward"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Exercise and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Maria Giné-Garriga
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Faculty of Psychology, Education and Sport Sciences Blanquerna, Ramon Llull University, Císter 34, 08022 Barcelona, Spain
2. Faculty of Health Sciences Blanquerna, Ramon Llull University, Padilla 326, 08025 Barcelona, Spain
Interests: older adults; health-related interventions; movement behavior; physical activity; sedentary behavior; physical function, participatory health research, co-creation
Dr. Jason Wilson
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Institute of Mental Health Sciences, School of Health Sciences, Ulster University, Newtownabbey, BT15 1ED, United Kingdom
Interests: accelerometry; active ageing; older adults; physical activity; sedentary behavior; behavior change interventions
Dr. Anna Puig-Ribera
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
Departament de Ciències de l'Activitat Física Esport i activitat física, University of Vic-Central University of Catalonia, C/ Sagrada Família, 7, 08500 Vic, Spain
Interests: physical activity-related interventions; sedentary behavior-related interventions; workplace; mental health; urban health; primary care; brain health; mobile health interventions
Dr. Andrea Hergenroeder
E-Mail Website
Assistant Guest Editor
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Pittsburgh, 221 Bridgeside Point 1, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
Interests: physical activity; sedentary behavior; health promotion; physical function; exercise for older adults and individuals with chronic disease

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB) are important determinants of health, quality of life and well-being. Despite the scientific evidence showing not only the physical but also the social and emotional benefits associated with regular PA and reduced SB, physical inactivity (e.g. not engaging in at least 150 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous PA per week) and sedentariness are widespread across many populations.

Physical inactivity and prolonged SB are costly to individuals, employers, and society. An inactive lifestyle can lead to higher health care expenditures, lost wages and productivity, and even declines in mental health. While we find numerous interventions aimed at increasing levels of PA and reducing SB in the scientific literature, the majority have achieved limited success particularly over the long term and when implemented in real-life conditions. In health promotion literature, there has been considerable concern about the need to maintain and retain health benefits achieved from health promotion interventions. It is widely recognized that there is a huge gap between the development of evidence-based interventions for public health and health promotion and their successful and sustainable implementation.

It is believed that interventions to reduce physical inactivity and SB will be ineffective over the long term, or at a population level, unless people are given opportunities (e.g. such as a supportive environment), resources, capability, and motivation to avoid or minimize SB and engage in regular PA. For this special issue, we invite submissions that thoroughly describe interventions to promote PA and/or reduce SB in all stages of life with a clear focus on strategies to enhance adherence, sustainability and implementation in practice. We are particularly interested in high-quality research related to evaluating the effect and/or process of health promotion interventions to reduce physical inactivity and SB. Researchers are invited to contribute novel work to be considered for publication in this special issue, including original articles, short communications, systematic reviews or meta-analyses.

Dr. Maria Giné-Garriga
Dr. Jason Wilson
Dr. Anna Puig-Ribera
Dr. Andrea Hergenroeder
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • health promotion
  • movement behaviour
  • physical activity
  • sedentary behaviour
  • health-related interventions
  • efficacy trials

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Music Tempo: A Tool for Regulating Walking Cadence and Physical Activity Intensity in Overweight Adults?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 7855; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18157855 - 25 Jul 2021
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Abstract
This study investigated if music tempo can prompt a desired walking cadence, and if music can provide a stimulus to regulate physical activity intensity in a longitudinal physical activity intervention with free-living adults. Overweight adults (n = 37; 94.26 ± 17.11 kg; [...] Read more.
This study investigated if music tempo can prompt a desired walking cadence, and if music can provide a stimulus to regulate physical activity intensity in a longitudinal physical activity intervention with free-living adults. Overweight adults (n = 37; 94.26 ± 17.11 kg; 49.63 ± 12.37 years) were randomly assigned to an intervention (IG, n = 17) or usual care group (UC, n = 20) as part of a novel nine-month walking intervention. IG participants walked to self-selected music with a predetermined tempo and received a behavioural change support programme. At baseline, four-, six- and nine-months participants were asked to walk around an elliptical track at their habitual pace (0–2 min) and then in time to a predetermined tempo (2–8 min) designed to elicit moderate intensity. Cadence response (steps/min) was assessed and intensity (heart rate (bpm) recorded using wireless telemetry. A repeated measures general linear model (GLM) examined differences between groups over time (p < 0.05). All data is presented as means ± SD. At each assessment point both groups displayed an immediate cadence adjustment in response to music tempo (p < 0.01) i.e., habitual cadence vs. 3 METs target cadence (p < 0.05) and 3 METs target cadence vs. 5 METs target cadence (p < 0.05). Additionally, IG participants displayed an increased habitual cadence (0–2 min) at each assessment point (p < 0.05; 110 ± 9, 121.80 ± 7.5, 121.46 ± 10, 121.93 ± 7 steps/min respectively). UC participant’s habitual cadence was unchanged from 0–9 months (p > 0.05; 120 ± 10, 116 ± 13, 119 ± 12 and 119 ± 9 steps/min respectively). Music tempo may be a useful regulatory tool to prompt the free-living individual to reach an appropriate stride rate to achieve a walking pace that is at least moderate intensity. It also appears that results may be trainable as throughout the study an increased habitual walking cadence was observed, in the absence of music. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Promotion: Moving Forward)
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Article
Validity of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire Long Form for Assessing Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Subjects with Chronic Stroke
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4729; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094729 - 29 Apr 2021
Viewed by 606
Abstract
Validation studies of questionnaires used to assess physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB) in stroke survivors are scarce. This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the validity of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire long-form (IPAQ-LF) in community living adults with post-stroke sequelae (≥6 [...] Read more.
Validation studies of questionnaires used to assess physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB) in stroke survivors are scarce. This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the validity of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire long-form (IPAQ-LF) in community living adults with post-stroke sequelae (≥6 months) and preserved ambulation. Participants’ functional mobility, lower limb strength, ambulatory level, stroke severity, and disability were assessed. An accelerometer (ActiGraph GT3X+) was worn for ≥7 consecutive days. Subsequently, the IPAQ-LF was interview-administered. Fifty-six participants (58.1 ± 11.1 years, 66.1% male) were included. A strong correlation between the two methods was found for total PA time (ρ = 0.55, p < 0.001). According to the Bland-Altman analyses, over-reporting moderate-to-vigorous PA and under-reporting total PA in the IPAQ-LF were found in those participants with higher PA levels. Both methods measured sedentary time similarly, though random error was observed between them. Moderate-strong correlations were found between the IPAQ-LF and physical function (ρ = 0.29–0.60, p < 0.05). In conclusion, in people with chronic stroke, the IPAQ-LF presented acceptable levels of validity for estimating total PA time in those who are insufficiently active. Therefore, it could be a useful tool to screen for inactive individuals with chronic stroke who can benefit from PA interventions addressed to implement healthier lifestyles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Promotion: Moving Forward)
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Article
A Pilot Randomised Clinical Trial of a Novel Approach to Reduce Sedentary Behaviour in Care Home Residents: Feasibility and Preliminary Effects of the GET READY Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2866; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082866 - 21 Apr 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1011
Abstract
Care-home residents are among the most sedentary and least active of the population. We aimed to assess the feasibility, acceptability, safety, and preliminary effects of an intervention to reduce sedentary behaviour (SB) co-created with care home residents, staff, family members, and policymakers within [...] Read more.
Care-home residents are among the most sedentary and least active of the population. We aimed to assess the feasibility, acceptability, safety, and preliminary effects of an intervention to reduce sedentary behaviour (SB) co-created with care home residents, staff, family members, and policymakers within a pilot two-armed pragmatic cluster randomized clinical trial (RCT). Four care homes from two European countries participated, and were randomly assigned to control (usual care, CG) or the Get Ready intervention (GR), delivered by a staff champion one-to-one with the care home resident and a family member. A total of thirty-one residents participated (51.6% female, 82.9 (13.6) years old). GR involves six face to face sessions over a 12-week period with goal-oriented prompts for movement throughout. The feasibility and acceptability of the intervention were assessed and adverse events (AEs) were collected. The preliminary effects of the GR on SB, quality of life, fear of falling, and physical function were assessed. Means and standard deviations are presented, with the mean change from baseline to post-intervention calculated along with 95% confidence intervals. The CG smoked more, sat more, and had more functional movement difficulties than the GR at baseline. The GR intervention was feasible and acceptable to residents and staff. No AEs occurred during the intervention. GR participants showed a decrease in daily hours spent sitting/lying (Cohen’s d = 0.36) and an increase in daily hours stepping, and improvements in health-related quality of life, fear of falling, and habitual gait speed compared to usual care, but these effects need confirmation in a definitive RCT. The co-created GR was shown to be feasible and acceptable, with no AEs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Promotion: Moving Forward)

Review

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Review
Using Mobile Applications to Increase Physical Activity: A Systematic Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 8238; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218238 - 07 Nov 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1203
Abstract
Unhealthy diet and physical inactivity—major risk factors for the main non-communicable diseases—can be addressed by mobile health applications. Using an evidence-based systematic review design, we analysed studies on mobile applications to foster physical activity to determine whether they met the objective of increasing [...] Read more.
Unhealthy diet and physical inactivity—major risk factors for the main non-communicable diseases—can be addressed by mobile health applications. Using an evidence-based systematic review design, we analysed studies on mobile applications to foster physical activity to determine whether they met the objective of increasing adults’ physical activity. A bibliographic search was conducted in October 2020 using PubMed, Cochrane Library Plus, Biomed Central, Psychology Database, and SpringerLink, retrieving 191 articles. After titles and abstracts were reviewed, 149 articles were excluded, leaving 42 articles for a full-text review, of which 14 met the inclusion criteria. Despite differences in study duration, design, and variables, 13 of the 14 studies reported that applications were effective in increasing physical activity and healthy habits as dietary behaviour. However, further longer-term studies with larger samples are needed to confirm the effectiveness of mobile health applications in increasing physical activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Promotion: Moving Forward)
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