Special Issue "Disasters Preparedness and Emergency Response: Prevention, Surveillance and Mitigation Planning"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Climate Change and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Mariusz Goniewicz
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Emergency Medicine, Medical University of Lublin, 20-059, Lublin, Poland
Interests: emergency medicine; disaster medicine; military medicine; surgery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In a globalized world in which crisis incidents are becoming more frequent, more devastating and have a significant impact on the health and lives of societies, the quality of healthcare services, including disaster preparedness in particular, is crucial for health security. Increased risk of a mass accident or catastrophe taking place necessitates the organization of remedial measures intended to protect against these types of unusual events, and to facilitate the preparation required to mitigate their impact. A well-established preparedness program is a prerequisite for the effective response of healthcare systems to emergencies.

While we have made progress in preparedness and emergency response in the last decades, much more needs to be done.

Research priorities in preparedness and emergency response include: developing and evaluating systems of public health services and disaster management; developing and evaluating strategies to train the healthcare workers to meet the responsibilities for detection, mitigation, and recovery in varied settings and populations; improving the identification of health vulnerabilities and evaluation interventions to lessen the risk of poor health outcomes; evaluation characteristics of effective risk communication in disaster and emergency settings; scenario modeling and forecasting; information and management tools to improve the availability and usefulness during crisis decision-making.

This Special Issue seeks research papers on new approaches that have been applied or are under development to improve preparedness and emergency response.  We especially encourage the submission of inter-disciplinary and crosscutting research. We also encourage the submission of manuscripts that are focused on various types of disasters, disaster and emergency research, and on policy or management solutions at multiple scales.

Dr. Mariusz Goniewicz
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • disasters
  • emergency
  • public health
  • readiness
  • response

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Importance of Immediate Electronic-Based Feedback to Enhance Feedback for First-Time CPR Trainees
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 3885; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18083885 - 07 Apr 2021
Viewed by 360
Abstract
Sudden cardiac arrest is one of the leading causes of death globally. The recommended clinical management in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases is the immediate initiation of high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Training mannequins should be combined with technology that provides students with detailed immediate [...] Read more.
Sudden cardiac arrest is one of the leading causes of death globally. The recommended clinical management in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases is the immediate initiation of high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Training mannequins should be combined with technology that provides students with detailed immediate feedback on the quality of CPR performance. This study aimed to verify the impacts of the type of feedback (basic or detailed) the responders receive from the device while learning CPR and how it influences the quality of their performance and the motivation to improve their skills. The study was conducted at the Medical University of Lublin among 694 multi-professional health students during first aid classes on basic life support (BLS). The students first practiced on an adult mannequin with a basic control panel; afterward, the same mannequin was connected to a laptop, ensuring a detailed record of the performed activities through a projector. Next, the participants expressed their subjective opinion on how the feedback provided during the classes, basic vs. detailed, motivated them to improve the quality of their CPR performance. Additionally, during the classes, the instructor conducted an extended observation of students’ work and behavior. In the students’ opinion, the CPR training with detailed feedback devices provided motivation for learning and improving CPR proficiency than that with a basic control panel. Furthermore, the comments given from devices seemed to be more acceptable to the students, who did not see any bias in the device’s evaluation compared to that of the instructor. Detailed device feedback motivates student health practitioners to learn and improve the overall quality of CPR. The use of mannequins that provide detailed feedback during BLS courses can improve survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
A Cross-Sectional Study on the Flood Emergency Preparedness among Healthcare Providers in Saudi Arabia
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(3), 1329; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031329 - 02 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1880
Abstract
This study used a descriptive cross-sectional methodology to measure healthcare workers’ knowledge, attitudes, perceptions, and willingness to respond to a flood scenario in Saudi Arabia. A validated survey was distributed to collect data using a convenience sampling technique through multiple social media platforms. [...] Read more.
This study used a descriptive cross-sectional methodology to measure healthcare workers’ knowledge, attitudes, perceptions, and willingness to respond to a flood scenario in Saudi Arabia. A validated survey was distributed to collect data using a convenience sampling technique through multiple social media platforms. A total of 227 participants were included in this study: 52% of them were aged between 26 to 34 years, 74% were residents from Riyadh, and 52.4% worked in nursing divisions. A significant number of respondents (73.2%) had positive perceptions towards their hospitals’ ability to provide an effective response to a flood, 89% were willing to report to work following a flood, and 90% of participants reported the need to develop both guidelines and training for flood disaster preparedness. Preparation and successful flood mitigation in the hospital setting requires staff that have both knowledge and training in emergency management. One way to obtain such readiness is through competency-based training, including both table-top and full-scale live exercises. Although the willingness to respond to such a flooding emergency was high among staff, the development of guidelines and educational programs is needed in order to develop the competencies and skills sets to improve disaster preparedness response and preparedness efforts. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Alcohol and Road Accidents Involving Pedestrians as Unprotected Road Users
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(23), 8995; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17238995 - 02 Dec 2020
Viewed by 1965
Abstract
According to the World Health Organization (WHO), more than half of all road fatalities involve vulnerable road users, i.e., pedestrians, cyclists, and motorcyclists. Poland is classified as one of the European Union (EU) countries marked by low road safety, with a higher frequency [...] Read more.
According to the World Health Organization (WHO), more than half of all road fatalities involve vulnerable road users, i.e., pedestrians, cyclists, and motorcyclists. Poland is classified as one of the European Union (EU) countries marked by low road safety, with a higher frequency of accidents involving pedestrians compared to other EU countries (31% of all fatalities). Among unprotected road users, a significant group of victims are pedestrians, who are often under the influence of alcohol. This study aims to analyze the impact of alcohol on the risk of occurrence and consequences of road accidents among pedestrians. The source of data was the medical documentation of the Department of Forensic Medicine of the Medical University of Warsaw. In more than half of pedestrian deaths, the presence of alcohol was found; regardless of the place of the event and the place of death, among the victims under the influence of alcohol, males dominated; the average age of the victims under the influence of alcohol was significantly lower compared to the average age of sober victims, with younger victims being significantly more likely to die at the scene of the accident, especially in rural areas; significantly higher alcohol concentrations were found in males, in victims who died at the scene of the accident, and with victims of accidents in rural areas. Among pedestrian traffic accident fatalities, the most numerous group comprised young men under the influence of alcohol. In rural areas, a higher percentage of pedestrian victims died at the scene as a result of excessive alcohol consumption. These areas should be subject to intensive preventive measures to increase the safety of pedestrians as unprotected road users. Full article
Back to TopTop