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Open AccessArticle

Importance of Immediate Electronic-Based Feedback to Enhance Feedback for First-Time CPR Trainees

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Department of Emergency Medicine, Medical University of Lublin, 20-059 Lublin, Poland
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Department of Aviation Security, Military University of Aviation, 08-521 Dęblin, Poland
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School of Nursing and Midwifery, Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD 4215, Australia
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Department of Emergency Medicine, Gold Coast Health, Gold Coast, QLD 4215, Australia
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Fellowship in Disaster Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre, Boston, MA 02215, USA
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Department of Emergency Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA
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Department of Information Systems and Business Analytics, College of Business, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33119, USA
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Department of Primary Health Care and General Practice, University of Otago, Wellington 6242, New Zealand
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Joint Centre for Disaster Research, Massey University, Wellington 6021, New Zealand
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Gothenburg Emergency Medicine Research Group (GEMREG), Sahlgrenska University Hospital, 413 45 Gothenburg, Sweden
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Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden
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USN School of Business, University of South-Eastern Norway, 3616 Kongsberg, Norway
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Institute of Clinical Sciences, Department of Surgery, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, 413 45 Gothenburg, Sweden
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Department of Development and Research, Armed Forces Center for Defense Medicine, 426 76 Gothenburg, Västra Frölunda, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Paul B. Tchounwou, Nicola Magnavita and Aristomenis Exadaktylos
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 3885; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18083885
Received: 25 February 2021 / Revised: 22 March 2021 / Accepted: 6 April 2021 / Published: 7 April 2021
Sudden cardiac arrest is one of the leading causes of death globally. The recommended clinical management in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases is the immediate initiation of high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Training mannequins should be combined with technology that provides students with detailed immediate feedback on the quality of CPR performance. This study aimed to verify the impacts of the type of feedback (basic or detailed) the responders receive from the device while learning CPR and how it influences the quality of their performance and the motivation to improve their skills. The study was conducted at the Medical University of Lublin among 694 multi-professional health students during first aid classes on basic life support (BLS). The students first practiced on an adult mannequin with a basic control panel; afterward, the same mannequin was connected to a laptop, ensuring a detailed record of the performed activities through a projector. Next, the participants expressed their subjective opinion on how the feedback provided during the classes, basic vs. detailed, motivated them to improve the quality of their CPR performance. Additionally, during the classes, the instructor conducted an extended observation of students’ work and behavior. In the students’ opinion, the CPR training with detailed feedback devices provided motivation for learning and improving CPR proficiency than that with a basic control panel. Furthermore, the comments given from devices seemed to be more acceptable to the students, who did not see any bias in the device’s evaluation compared to that of the instructor. Detailed device feedback motivates student health practitioners to learn and improve the overall quality of CPR. The use of mannequins that provide detailed feedback during BLS courses can improve survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. View Full-Text
Keywords: first aid; education; basic life support; cardiopulmonary resuscitation; feedback device; simulation; quality; skill retention; motivation; chest recoil; mannequin first aid; education; basic life support; cardiopulmonary resuscitation; feedback device; simulation; quality; skill retention; motivation; chest recoil; mannequin
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MDPI and ACS Style

Misztal-Okońska, P.; Goniewicz, K.; Goniewicz, M.; Ranse, J.; Hertelendy, A.J.; Gray, L.; Carlström, E.; Løwe Sørensen, J.; Khorram-Manesh, A. Importance of Immediate Electronic-Based Feedback to Enhance Feedback for First-Time CPR Trainees. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 3885. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18083885

AMA Style

Misztal-Okońska P, Goniewicz K, Goniewicz M, Ranse J, Hertelendy AJ, Gray L, Carlström E, Løwe Sørensen J, Khorram-Manesh A. Importance of Immediate Electronic-Based Feedback to Enhance Feedback for First-Time CPR Trainees. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(8):3885. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18083885

Chicago/Turabian Style

Misztal-Okońska, Patrycja; Goniewicz, Krzysztof; Goniewicz, Mariusz; Ranse, Jamie; Hertelendy, Attila J.; Gray, Lesley; Carlström, Eric; Løwe Sørensen, Jarle; Khorram-Manesh, Amir. 2021. "Importance of Immediate Electronic-Based Feedback to Enhance Feedback for First-Time CPR Trainees" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 18, no. 8: 3885. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18083885

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