Special Issue "Occurrence, Fate, Transport and Reactivity of Contaminants of Emerging Concern in Aquatic Ecosystems"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Science and Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Olivier Pourret
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
UniLaSalle, Beauvais, France
Interests: trace metal speciation; geochemical; toxicological; transport to the ocean; overall environmental impact on water quality
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Natalia Ospina-Alvarez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Catalan Institute for Water Research (ICRA), Spain
Interests: Trace metals, Emerging Contaminants, Biogeochemistry
Dr. Haiyan Liu
E-Mail
Guest Editor
East China University of Technology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colelagues,

This Special Issue focuses on Occurrence, Fate, Transport and Reactivity of Contaminants of Emerging Concern in Aquatic Ecosystems (lake, streams, rivers, wetlands, groundwaters, estuaries...). Contaminants of emerging concern are chemical forms that are mostly not regulated or monitored, can cause strong environmental impacts and often are related to human activities. Despite their concentrations often remaining at trace levels (i.e. up to μg/L), those emerging contaminants are potentially linked to toxic effects. Their fates and behaviours in aquatic ecosystems are still not fully understood and their associated risks are not  clearly known.

Therefore, it is necessary to characterize and understand their role in aquatic ecosystems, where many of these contaminants are finally discarded. In this Special Issue, we encourage submissions that consider emerging contaminants such as nanoparticles, pharmaceuticals, micro(nano)plastics, and emerging metallic contaminants. We aim to bring together studies on the occurrence, fate, transformations transport and reactivity of emerging contaminants in aquatic ecosystems, as well as discuss the analytical challenges for their determination and quantification.

Regardless of recent advances, public health and health care institutions need a better understanding of the vulnerability of these contaminants of emerging concern, which are distributed widely in the environment. Evidence related to their identification, fate and transport in different environmental compartments is a high priority.

Due to their low concentrations and difficulties during analysis, methodological experiences for analysis of emerging contaminants are very welcome. New analytical capabilities have allowed scientists to identify these chemicals in the environment in extremely small concentrations.

To sum up, we would like to invite authors to submit original research and review articles focused on contaminants of emerging concern, their occurrence, fate, transport and reactivity in aquatic ecosystems.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Development in detection methods and devices;
  • Fate and behaviour in aquatic ecosystems;
  • Emerging contaminants source control and management;
  • Monitoring in water;
  • Contaminants of emerging concern associated toxicity and risk assessment;
  • Technologies and processes for control and removal of contaminants of emerging concern.

Prof. Olivier Pourret
Dr. Natalia Ospina-Alvarez
Dr. Haiyan Liu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Occurrence and Distribution of Uranium in a Hydrological Cycle around a Uranium Mill Tailings Pond, Southern China
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(3), 773; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17030773 - 26 Jan 2020
Abstract
Uranium (U) mining activities, which lead to contamination in soils and waters (i.e., leachate from U mill tailings), cause serious environmental problems. However, limited research works have been conducted on U pollution associated with a whole soil-water system. In this study, a total [...] Read more.
Uranium (U) mining activities, which lead to contamination in soils and waters (i.e., leachate from U mill tailings), cause serious environmental problems. However, limited research works have been conducted on U pollution associated with a whole soil-water system. In this study, a total of 110 samples including 96 solid and 14 water samples were collected to investigate the characteristics of U distribution in a natural soil-water system near a U mining tailings pond. Results showed that U concentrations ranged from 0.09 ± 0.02 mg/kg to 2.56 × 104± 23 mg/kg in solid samples, and varied greatly in different locations. For tailings sand samples, the highest U concentration (2.56× 104 ± 23 mg/kg) occurred at the depth of 80 cm underground, whereas, for paddy soil samples, the highest U concentration (5.22 ± 0.04 mg/kg) was found at surface layers. Geo-accumulation index and potential ecological hazard index were calculated to assess the hazard of U in the soils. The calculation results showed that half of the soil sampling sites were moderately polluted. For groundwater samples, U concentrations ranged from 0.55 ± 0.04 mg/L to 3.36 ± 0.02 mg/L with a mean value of 2.36 ± 0.36 mg/L, which was significantly lower than that of percolating waters (ranging from 4.56 ± 0.02 mg/L to 12.05 ± 0.04 mg/L, mean 7.91 ± 0.98 mg/L). The results of this study suggest that the distribution of U concentrations in a soil-water system was closely associated with hydrological cycles and U concentrations decreased with circulation path. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Characteristics and Assessment of Toxic Metal Contamination in Surface Water and Sediments Near a Uranium Mining Area
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(2), 548; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020548 - 15 Jan 2020
Abstract
Concentrations of potentially toxic metals including Cd, Cu, Pb, Cr, U, Th in surface water and sediment samples collected from a river were analyzed to assess the contaminations, distribution characteristics, and sources of these metals. The contents of the metals were lower than [...] Read more.
Concentrations of potentially toxic metals including Cd, Cu, Pb, Cr, U, Th in surface water and sediment samples collected from a river were analyzed to assess the contaminations, distribution characteristics, and sources of these metals. The contents of the metals were lower than the standard levels set by World Health Organization (WHO) for drinking water. However, U and Th contents were far beyond the background values of surface water. The concentrations of Cd, Cr, and U in sediments were higher than the background values and the Probable Effect Level (PEL) of sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) which may result in high potential harmful biological effects to aquatic ecosystems. Based on the contamination factor (CF), geo-accumulation index (Igeo), and potential ecological risk index (RI), Cd, Cr, and U were considered to be the metals that mainly contribute to the contamination of sediments. The calculation results also indicated that the sites adjacent to the uranium ore field were highly polluted. Results of cluster analysis, principal component analysis, and correlation analysis revealed that Cr, Pb, U, and Th were highly correlated with each other. These metals mainly originated from both anthropogenic sources and natural processes, especially emissions from uranium mining and quarrying, whereas Cd mostly came from anthropogenic sources (agricultural activities) of the upper reaches of the river. Full article
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