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Psychological Health and Benefits of Mindfulness-Based Interventions

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Behavioral and Mental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 4075

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
2. Department of Community and Behavioral Health, Colorado School of Public Health, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
Interests: reducing regulation and health problems in adolescents through mindfulness and mindfulness-based interventions; stressful environments and stress responding in adolescence

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Studies investigating the benefits of mindfulness-based interventions for psychological health and well-being have proliferated exponentially since 2006. However, much of this research has focused on relatively short-term change in samples of white adults from Western countries, with an underuse of active control interventions. In the last several years, there has been growing interest in a process-oriented investigation of mindfulness-based interventions, an emphasis on long-term change in participants of mindfulness-based interventions vs. other active intervention conditions, and innovations in the delivery of mindfulness-based interventions and/or assessment of their effects. This Special Issue invites papers that represent these innovations and next steps in the study of the benefits of mindfulness-based interventions for psychological health. The following topics are particularly encouraged: (a) process-oriented tests of these benefits that focus on how (i.e., mechanisms of change or mediators) and/or for whom (i.e., moderators) mindfulness-based interventions benefit psychological health; (b) tests of novel delivery methods of mindfulness-based interventions (e.g., mobile health) and/or tests of the benefits of mindfulness-based interventions that incorporate innovations in measurement/analysis (e.g., through the use of intensive repeated measurements, neuroscientific outcomes, objective measurements of mindfulness, and/or health); and (c) studies that represent populations underrepresented in the mindfulness-based intervention literature, including individuals from non-Western countries, children and/or adolescents, and individuals from traditionally minoritized backgrounds.

Dr. Rachel G. Lucas-Thompson
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • mindfulness-based intervention
  • mental health
  • well-being
  • underrepresented
  • psychological health
  • mHealth
  • health behaviors
  • mindfulness
  • randomized controlled trials

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Editorial

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5 pages, 289 KiB  
Editorial
Advancing the Study of Mindfulness-Based Interventions in Relation to Psychological Health
by Rachel G. Lucas-Thompson and Megan J. Moran
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(8), 5473; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20085473 - 11 Apr 2023
Viewed by 1141
Abstract
Since 2006, there has been exponential growth in the number of publications on mindfulness [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychological Health and Benefits of Mindfulness-Based Interventions)

Research

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18 pages, 936 KiB  
Article
Mindfulness Intervention Improves Coping and Perceptions of Children’s Behavior among Families with Elevated Risk
by Jill T. Krause and Samantha M. Brown
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(23), 7092; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20237092 - 21 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1787
Abstract
Mindfulness-informed interventions (MIIs) are increasingly common but have not been extensively studied among families with elevated levels of risk (e.g., those involved in child protective services and/or receiving financial assistance). These families often experience high rates of stressors that can impact coping strategies, [...] Read more.
Mindfulness-informed interventions (MIIs) are increasingly common but have not been extensively studied among families with elevated levels of risk (e.g., those involved in child protective services and/or receiving financial assistance). These families often experience high rates of stressors that can impact coping strategies, interpersonal dynamics, and relationships. Given that mindfulness has been shown to promote health and wellbeing, this study used a sample from two pilot randomized controlled trials to test the extent to which a mindfulness-informed intervention improved coping strategies and perceptions of children’s behavior among 53 families with elevated risk. A principal components analysis with a direct oblimin rotation revealed that cognitive–emotion coping strategies could be characterized by three factors: positive adaptation, negative adaptation, and positive refocusing. Intention-to-treat analysis indicated significant group by time differences, with intervention participants demonstrating improvements in positive refocusing coping, positive adaptation coping, and perceptions of children’s behavior problems compared to participants in the waitlist control group. No significant differences were found for negative adaptation coping strategies. Findings provide preliminary support for the benefits of mindfulness training in a sample generally underrepresented in the mindfulness intervention literature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychological Health and Benefits of Mindfulness-Based Interventions)
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Other

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16 pages, 728 KiB  
Protocol
Mindfulness in Pregnancy and Postpartum: Protocol of a Pilot Randomized Trial of Virtually Delivered Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy to Promote Well-Being during the Perinatal Period
by Shannon D. Donofry, Dayna Winograd, Diva Kothari, Christine C. Call, Kelsey E. Magee, Riley J. Jouppi, Rachel P. Kolko Conlon and Michele D. Levine
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2024, 21(5), 622; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph21050622 - 14 May 2024
Viewed by 590
Abstract
Background: During the period from pregnancy through the first year postpartum, vulnerable individuals are at elevated risk for the onset or worsening of psychological distress, and accessible (e.g., virtually delivered) mental health interventions are needed. Research suggests that Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) can [...] Read more.
Background: During the period from pregnancy through the first year postpartum, vulnerable individuals are at elevated risk for the onset or worsening of psychological distress, and accessible (e.g., virtually delivered) mental health interventions are needed. Research suggests that Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) can effectively mitigate psychological distress, although few studies have evaluated MBCT in the perinatal period, and samples have been clinically homogenous. Thus, we have designed and are conducting a pilot trial of virtually delivered MBCT with pregnant individuals experiencing a range of psychological symptoms to assess its feasibility and preliminarily explore its effectiveness. Here, we present the study protocol. Methods: Eligible participants (target N = 70) are ≥18 years with pregnancies between 12 and 30 weeks of gestation. Participants complete a diagnostic interview, self-report symptom ratings, and a computerized cognitive battery assessing self-regulation at the baseline. Participants are then randomized to either MBCT or care as usual. The MBCT intervention involves eight weekly group sessions delivered virtually, with each session focusing on a mindfulness practice followed by group discussion and skill development. Participants in the intervention group are also encouraged to practice mindfulness skills between sessions. Participants in the control condition are provided with information about mindfulness and treatment resources. Baseline measures are repeated following the eight-week intervention period and at three months postpartum. Conclusions: This pilot study is designed to evaluate the feasibility of virtually delivered MBCT and explore group differences in psychological symptoms during the perinatal period, and will lay the foundation for a larger clinical trial focused on optimizing this intervention to improve psychological functioning among diverse pregnant individuals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychological Health and Benefits of Mindfulness-Based Interventions)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Effectiveness of a mindfulness-based professional development program for primary school teachers in the Czech Republic: Quasi-experimental study;
Authors: Kami Dvorakova; Laura Garcia Valladares; Bethany Butzer; Calvin Lange; Mark Greenberg;

Title: Within-Person Symptom Variability as a Barrier to Engagement in a Mindfulness-Based Group Mental Health Intervention
Authors: Brock A. Rigsby, Reagan L. Miller, Megan J. Moran, Addie J. Rzonca, Jonathan Najman, Michael S. Lincoln, Melanie S. Adams, Mark Prince, Rachel G. Lucas-Thompson

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