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Improving Performance and Health through Exercise and Nutrition: Implications for Special Environments, Outdoor Sports and Special Populations

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Exercise and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2023) | Viewed by 4291

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Physiatry and Nursing, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences (FCSD), University of Zaragoza, Ronda Misericordia 5, 22001 Huesca, Spain
Interests: adolescents; MASS; osteoporosis; children; fractures; physical-activity; publication bias; weight-bearing exercise; vitamin-D status; impact exercise
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Health and Sport Science (FCSD), Universidad de Zaragoza, 50012 Zaragoza, Spain
Interests: body composition; health; exercise; physical activity; bone

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Guest Editor
Department of Physiatry and Nursing, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Zaragoza, 50012 Zaragoza, Spain
Interests: prevention and health promotion; physical education and sport

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Healthy lifestyles, such as the practice of sports or daily physical activity and proper nutrition, are environmental factors that condition health. Research on how to improve health is approached from an interdisciplinary perspective, and a specific vision is also given towards activities that are conditioned by the environment, especially in territories that take advantage of their natural environment.

Mountain sport activities are growing to be more popular all around the world, with the number of people involved in these activities increasing exponentially. However, the science behind these sports and approaches to improving performance and reducing injuries and fatal accidents during their practice have not been focused on much in recent years.  

This Special Issue seeks research papers focusing on the improvement in health through exercise and nutrition in general as well as specifically through outdoor activities related with the mountains or with water sports. Papers detailing methods of improving performance and avoiding injuries and accidents in these sports are also encouraged. These could take a multidisciplinary approach, including but not limited to: ergogenic aids, biomechanics, physiotherapy, training, physiological and psychological factors. We also welcome rescue and security protocols developed by national agencies that could be of interest for researchers and trainers of the field. Original research papers as well as systematic reviews and meta-analysis will be considered.

Prof. Dr. Germán Vicente-Rodríguez
Dr. Gabriel Lozano-Berges
Dr. Alejandro Gomez-Bruton
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • health Sciences
  • physical activity and health
  • nutrition
  • environment influencing health
  • outdoor sports
  • mountain security
  • rescue
  • sport nutrition
  • hostile soils and health
  • healthy and safe exercise on nature

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 759 KiB  
Article
Differential Magnitude of Resilience between Emotional Intelligence and Life Satisfaction in Mountain Sports Athletes
by Guillermo Sanz-Junoy, Óscar Gavín-Chocano, José L. Ubago-Jiménez and David Molero
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(15), 6525; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20156525 - 4 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1571
Abstract
The field of mountain sports has its own characteristics, different from other sports modalities. Emotional intelligence and resilience not only refer to the adaptive capacity that can be developed after an adverse experience, but can also be factors that positively affect sporting performance [...] Read more.
The field of mountain sports has its own characteristics, different from other sports modalities. Emotional intelligence and resilience not only refer to the adaptive capacity that can be developed after an adverse experience, but can also be factors that positively affect sporting performance in extreme conditions. In this study, 4818 athletes from the Spanish Federation of Mountain Sports and Climbing participated; 2696 were men (67.1%) and 1322 were women (32.9%), with a mean age of 49.42 years (±11.9). The Resilience Scale (RS-14), Wong Law Emotional Intelligence Scale (WLEIS-S) and Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS) were used. The aim was to provide evidence for the potential for resilience (personal competence and acceptance of self and life) among EI and life satisfaction in mountain and climbing athletes. The results showed that the coefficients of determination of personal competence [(Q2 = 0.286); (R2 = 0.578)], acceptance of self [(Q2 = 0.310); (R2 = 0.554)] and life satisfaction [(Q2 = 0.299); (R2 = 0.421)] for the estimation of the measurement model indicated a good model fit. In the future, it would be necessary to carry out specific studies discriminating by sport modality and methods for this area, with a large number of athletes and disciplines, as well as evaluating its possible applications for the improvement of emotional factors. Full article
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11 pages, 333 KiB  
Article
Playground Design: Contribution to Duration of Stay and Implications for Physical Activity
by Deborah A. Cohen, Meghan Talarowski, Bing Han, Stephanie Williamson, Emily Galfond, Deborah R. Young, Sarah Eng and Thomas L. McKenzie
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(5), 4661; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20054661 - 6 Mar 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2137
Abstract
Background: The study goal was to identify playground features associated with visitor length of stay and physical activity. Methods: We observed playground visitors over 4 days during summer 2021 in 60 playgrounds in 10 US cities, selected based on design, population density, and [...] Read more.
Background: The study goal was to identify playground features associated with visitor length of stay and physical activity. Methods: We observed playground visitors over 4 days during summer 2021 in 60 playgrounds in 10 US cities, selected based on design, population density, and poverty levels. We observed 4278 visitors and documented their length of stay. We observed an additional 3713 visitors for 8 min, recording their playground location, activity level, and use of electronic media. Results: People stayed an average of 32 min (range 5 min–4 h). Stay time varied by group size, with larger groups staying longer. The presence of restrooms increased the likelihood of staying longer by 48%. Playground size, mature trees, swings, climbers, and spinners were associated with longer stays. When a teen was a part of the group observed, the group was 64% less likely to stay longer. The use of electronic media was associated with lower amounts of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity compared to non-media users. Conclusions: To increase population-level physical activity and time spent outdoors, playground features associated with a longer stay should be considered when renovating or building new playgrounds. Full article
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