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New Advances in Diabetes

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Infectious Diseases, Chronic Diseases, and Disease Prevention".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 1919

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Public Health and Maternal & Child Health, Faculty of Medicine, IdISSC, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Interests: diabetes mellitus; health education; statistics and numerical data

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Diabetes mellitus is a very prevalent disease that results in high costs to health systems and important morbidity and mortality. Investigation into diabetes is needed in order to reduce its incidence and complications and to improve the quality of life of the persons affected by this condition. New advances in diabetes imply studies in genetics, etiology, treatments, and monitoring. Furthermore, more epidemiological and basic investigations are necessary. Future advances include the design and application of novel remote sensing and information technology. The application of new statistical and artificial intelligence techniques will make it possible to analyze the data obtained from empirical research. The evaluation of diabetes can also provide important information for the design of future education programs. Globally, diabetes is among the top 10 causes of death.

Given the importance of diabetes, the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH) is launching a Special Issue entitled “New advances in diabetes” with the aim of gathering accurate and up-to-date scientific information on all aspects of diabetes.

We are pleased to invite you and your co-workers to submit original research articles and review articles aimed at providing a comprehensive overview of the advances in the understanding and treatment of this disease.

Prof. Dr. David Carabantes-Alarcón
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • diabetes mellitus
  • therapeutics
  • blood glucose self-monitoring
  • wearable electronic devices
  • etiology
  • mortality
  • prevention and control
  • statistics and numerical data
  • pregnancy in diabetics
  • health education

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 388 KiB  
Article
Use of Cardiac Procedures in People with Diabetes during the COVID Pandemic in Spain: Effects on the In-Hospital Mortality
by Ana Lopez-de-Andres, Rodrigo Jimenez-Garcia, David Carabantes-Alarcon, Valentín Hernández-Barrera, José M. de-Miguel-Yanes, Javier de-Miguel-Diez, Jose J. Zamorano-Leon, Jose L. del-Barrio and Natividad Cuadrado-Corrales
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(1), 844; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20010844 - 2 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1484
Abstract
We aimed to assess the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic in Spain on people with diabetes undergoing cardiac procedures, such as coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), open surgical valve replacement (OSVR), and transcatheter valve implantation (TCVI). We compared the [...] Read more.
We aimed to assess the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic in Spain on people with diabetes undergoing cardiac procedures, such as coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), open surgical valve replacement (OSVR), and transcatheter valve implantation (TCVI). We compared the year 2019 with the year 2020. We conducted an observational study using data from the Spanish National Hospital Discharge Database from 1 January 2019 to 31 December 2020. In 2020, a total of 21,067 cardiac procedures were performed on people with diabetes compared with 24,675 in the previous year. The use of CABG, PCI, OSVR and TCVI decreased from 2019 to 2020 by 13.9%, 14.8%, 21.4% and 2.9%, respectively. In 2020, patients had a significantly higher mean Charlson Comorbidity Index than in 2019 for all the cardiac procedures analyzed. In-hospital mortality (IHM) was higher (p > 0.05) for all the procedures in the year 2020. Over the entire period, female sex was a significant risk factor for IHM among those who underwent CABG, PCI and OSVR (OR 1.94, 95%CI 1.41–2.66; OR 1.19, 95%CI 1.05–1.35; and OR 1.79, 95%CI 1.38–2.32, respectively). The sensitivity analysis including two more years, 2017 and 2018, confirmed that female patients and comorbidity were risk factors for IHM in patients with diabetes regardless of whether it was during the pandemic era or before. We conclude that the frequency of cardiac procedures among people with diabetes declined in 2020. IHM did not change significantly in the COVID-19 era. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advances in Diabetes)
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