Topical Collection "Clinical Simulation in Health Sciences"

A topical collection in Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This collection belongs to the section "Nursing".

Editors

Dr. Cesar Leal-Costa
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Nursing Faculty, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain
Interests: nursing
Dr. José Luis Díaz Agea
E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Faculty of Nursing, Catholic University of Murcia, 30107 Guadalupe, Spain
Interests: nursing

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue encompassing all areas of applications and research in healthcare simulation technology and reflects its mission to advance the science of healthcare simulation. The journal is relevant to a broad range of health professionals. Priority will be given to research results related to safety and quality-oriented training programs, the development of educational and competency assessments, and reports of experience in the use of simulation technology and virtual reality.

Dr. Cesar Leal-Costa
Dr. José Luis Díaz Agea
Collection Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Clinical simulation
  • Safety and quality-oriented training programs
  • Development of educational and competency assessment
  • Non-technical skills, clinical skills
  • Innovative teaching/learning strategies using simulation
  • Clinical and academic uses of simulation
  • Leadership for simulation
  • Virtual reality

Published Papers (11 papers)

2021

Jump to: 2020

Article
Training with High Fidelity Simulation in the Care of Patients with Coronavirus—A Learning Experience in Native Health Care Multi-Professional Teams
Healthcare 2021, 9(10), 1260; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9101260 - 24 Sep 2021
Viewed by 360
Abstract
The training of emergency and intensive care teams in technical and non-technical skills is fundamental. The general aim of this study was to evaluate the training of various professional teams with simulations based on the care of COVID-19 patients using Zone 3 simulations [...] Read more.
The training of emergency and intensive care teams in technical and non-technical skills is fundamental. The general aim of this study was to evaluate the training of various professional teams with simulations based on the care of COVID-19 patients using Zone 3 simulations (native emergency medical services and intensive care units-ICU teams) in the Region of Murcia (Spain). A mixed pilot study was designed (qualitative/quantitative) comprised of three phases: Phase 1: detection of needs (focus groups), Phase 2: design of simulation scenarios, and Phase 3: training with high-fidelity simulation and evaluation of competences. The results were used to determine the real training needs of these health professionals, which were used to design four simulation scenarios in line with these needs. The team competences were evaluated before and after the training session, with increases observed after the training sessions, especially in non-technical skills such as communication. Training with zone 3 simulation, with multi-professional native emergency and intensive care teams who provided care to patients with coronavirus was shown to be an effective method, especially for training in non-technical skills. We should consider the training needs of the professionals before the start of any training program to stay one-step ahead of crisis situations. Full article
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Article
Effect of Korean Advanced Life Support Education on Non-Technical and Technical Skills of Nursing Students: A Pilot Study
Healthcare 2021, 9(10), 1253; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9101253 - 23 Sep 2021
Viewed by 376
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate the effect of the Korean Advanced Life Support (KALS) education program on the non-technical skills and technical skills of nursing students. This one-group pretest–posttest experimental study included 46 participants who were fourth year nursing students at Shinsung University [...] Read more.
This study aimed to investigate the effect of the Korean Advanced Life Support (KALS) education program on the non-technical skills and technical skills of nursing students. This one-group pretest–posttest experimental study included 46 participants who were fourth year nursing students at Shinsung University located in Dangjin-si, Chungcheongnam-do Province, Republic of Korea. Data were collected in April 2021 and analyzed via SPSS/WIN 25.0, using a paired samples t-test. The current study results report a significant improvement in the non-technical skills from 30.58 to 47.16 points (t = −5.892, p < 0.001). Furthermore, KALS training improved communication confidence from 23.45 to 35.77 points (t = −6.563, p < 0.001), critical thinking tendency from 96.71 to 107.16 points (t = −3.352, p = 0.002), and self-efficacy in performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation from 33.56 to 49.81 points (t = −13.242, p < 0.001). Lastly, technical skills also improved from 18.35 to 27.94 points (t = −28.439, p < 0.001). Therefore, the findings indicate that KALS education was effective in improving the non-technical and technical skills of these nursing students. However, this study did not analyze the effect of the stress level experienced by the study participants in emergency situations on their non-technical and technical skill performance. Thus, future studies should verify the effect of external stressors, caused by unpredictable emergencies, on non-technical and technical skill performance. Full article
Article
A New Tool for Assessment of Professional Skills of Occupational Therapy Students
Healthcare 2021, 9(10), 1243; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9101243 - 22 Sep 2021
Viewed by 681
Abstract
The assessment of the acquisition of professional skills is an essential process in occupational therapy students. Until now, there has been no standardized and validated instrument for evaluating these skills in Spanish occupational therapy students. This study reports the development and testing of [...] Read more.
The assessment of the acquisition of professional skills is an essential process in occupational therapy students. Until now, there has been no standardized and validated instrument for evaluating these skills in Spanish occupational therapy students. This study reports the development and testing of the psychometric properties of the professional skills in students of occupational therapy during their practical training. Methods: A new instrument was developed to assess the professional skills of occupational therapy students, called CPTO. A total of 69 occupational therapists participated in evaluating 295 occupational therapy students from the University of Granada, between the 2018 and 2021 academic years. Results: Of a total of 79 items, the factor analysis yielded a final solution of 33 items, which explains 70.22% of the variance with the following three dimensions: (1) self-appraisal and professional responsibility (α = 0.951); (2) communication skills and delivering intervention (α = 0.944); and (3) clinical reasoning for assessing and planning the intervention (α = 0.947). The instrument allows students with low, medium, high and excellent clinical skills to be differentiated according to the cutting points established by the quartiles. Conclusion: the instrument has good psychometric properties, and is a useful tool to assess professional competencies in occupational therapy students during their practice placement education. Full article
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Article
High-Fidelity Virtual Objective Structured Clinical Examinations with Standardized Patients in Nursing Students: An Innovative Proposal during the COVID-19 Pandemic
Healthcare 2021, 9(3), 355; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9030355 - 20 Mar 2021
Viewed by 1073
Abstract
In response to the cancellation of in-person objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) prompted by confinement due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we designed a solution to adapt our traditional OSCEs to this new reality in nursing education. We implemented an innovative teaching proposal based [...] Read more.
In response to the cancellation of in-person objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) prompted by confinement due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we designed a solution to adapt our traditional OSCEs to this new reality in nursing education. We implemented an innovative teaching proposal based on high-fidelity virtual OSCEs with standardized patients. The purposes of our study were to describe this innovative teaching proposal and compare nursing competence acquisition in final year nursing students through virtual and in-person OSCE modalities. The study included 234 undergraduate students: 123 students were assessed through high-fidelity virtual OSCEs during May 2020, whereas 111 students were assessed through in-person OSCEs during May 2019. The structure of OSCEs, including its stations, clinical simulated scenarios, and checklists, was the same in both OSCE modalities. The effect size of the differences among the competence categories of checklists, including their total scores, was small. Regarding our virtual OSCEs was similarly successful to in-person OSCEs, this online format was found to be useful, feasible, and cost-saving when in-person OSCE was not possible. Therefore, high-fidelity virtual OSCEs with standardized patients could be considered as another choice of OSCE not only in the current COVID-19 pandemic but could also be extended to normal situations, even post-pandemic. Full article
Article
Does Multidisciplinary Team Simulation-Based Training Improve Obstetric Emergencies Skills?
Healthcare 2021, 9(2), 170; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9020170 - 05 Feb 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1027
Abstract
Clinical simulation in obstetrics has turned out to be a tool that can reduce the rate of perinatal morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to analyze the impact and evaluate the effects of training with high-fidelity simulation of obstetric emergencies [...] Read more.
Clinical simulation in obstetrics has turned out to be a tool that can reduce the rate of perinatal morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to analyze the impact and evaluate the effects of training with high-fidelity simulation of obstetric emergencies on a multidisciplinary group. The quasi-experimental research study was structured in three phases: a first phase where the most important obstetric emergencies were determined, a second phase of design and development of the selected cases for simulation training, and a third and final phase where the abilities and satisfaction of the multidisciplinary team were analyzed. Three scenarios and their respective evaluation tools of obstetric emergencies were selected for simulation training: postpartum hemorrhage, shoulder dystocia, and breech delivery. The health professionals significantly improved their skills after training, and were highly satisfied with the simulation experience (p < 0.05). An inter-observer agreement between good and excellent reliability was obtained. Regarding conclusions, we can state that high-fidelity obstetric emergency simulation training improved the competencies of the health professionals. Full article
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Article
Debriefing and Learning Strategies: A Comparison between Two Reflective Analysis Styles with/without a Graphical Record of Strengths/Weaknesses
Healthcare 2021, 9(2), 130; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9020130 - 28 Jan 2021
Viewed by 787
Abstract
Background: Clinical simulation efficiently complements the training of Nursing Degree students. The debriefing phase is the most important feature of simulation-based learning, where the students are able to acquire the necessary competences. It is at this stage where learning strategies and motivation play [...] Read more.
Background: Clinical simulation efficiently complements the training of Nursing Degree students. The debriefing phase is the most important feature of simulation-based learning, where the students are able to acquire the necessary competences. It is at this stage where learning strategies and motivation play a crucial role. The objective of the study was to analyze the relationship between the style of debriefing utilized in the simulation sessions, and the learning strategies of Nursing Degree students who participated in a high-fidelity clinical simulation. Method: This was a quasi-experimental study conducted with a sample of 200 students in their third and fourth years at university. To obtain the data, an evaluation Questionnaire for the Evaluation of Learning Strategies of University Students (CEVEAPEU) was utilized, as well as two different types of structured debriefing styles, namely, with or without a graphical representation of the strengths/weaknesses during the analytical phase. The data analysis was performed with the SPSS® v25 program. Results: Statistically significant differences were found, with higher scores obtained when utilizing debriefing with a graphical representation, on both scales of the questionnaire (affective and cognitive), on the motivational, metacognitive and processing, and use of information subscales, and twelve learning strategies mostly belonging to the subscales of motivation; searching, collecting, and selecting information; and processing and using information. Conclusion: Debriefing with a graphical representation is deemed, a priori, as the most adequate approach for our context, based on the greater number of learning strategies utilized by our students. The use of a written graphical record of the strengths and weaknesses in the analytical phase is recommended. Full article
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2020

Jump to: 2021

Article
Developing an Innovative Medical Training Simulation Device for Peripheral Venous Access: A User-Centered Design Approach
Healthcare 2020, 8(4), 420; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040420 - 22 Oct 2020
Viewed by 812
Abstract
Nurses and other health students may lack the proper time for training procedural tasks, such as peripheral venous access. There is a need to develop these abilities in novices so that errors can be avoided when treating real patients. Nonetheless, from an experiential [...] Read more.
Nurses and other health students may lack the proper time for training procedural tasks, such as peripheral venous access. There is a need to develop these abilities in novices so that errors can be avoided when treating real patients. Nonetheless, from an experiential point of view, the simulation devices offered in the market do not always make sense for educators and trainees. This could make the adoption of new technology difficult. The purpose of this case study is to describe the development of an innovative simulation device and to propose concrete tactics for the involvement of the educators and trainees. We used a participative design based approach, with an ethnographic basis, where incremental cycles of user testing, development and iteration were involved. The study showcases methods from the field of design and anthropology that can be used to develop future simulation devices that resonate with students and educators to achieve a long term learning experience. Results could shed a light on new ways for the involvement of educators and students to create devices that resonate with them, making learning significant and effective. Full article
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Article
Nursing Students’ Perception on the Effectiveness of Emergency Competence Learning through Simulation
Healthcare 2020, 8(4), 397; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040397 - 13 Oct 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 733
Abstract
(1) Background: Simulation is a part of the day-to-day of the learning method in health sciences. The objective is to determine if the clinical simulation is useful for learning in the emergency setting, from the point of view of the nursing students. [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Simulation is a part of the day-to-day of the learning method in health sciences. The objective is to determine if the clinical simulation is useful for learning in the emergency setting, from the point of view of the nursing students. (2) Methods: A pre- and post-test exploratory study with an analytical and quasi-experimental design was used. The population is made up of nursing students from the Seville Red Cross Nursing Centre, who conducted a simulation exercise in the form of a drill for the care of multiple victims. A specific questionnaire was employed as a tool to analyse the dimensions of satisfaction, confidence and motivation, clinical experience, and decision making and technical abilities. (3) Results: There were favourable significant differences in the set of global responses, with p < 0.0001 for the “satisfaction” dimension and d = 1.25 for the “large” size of the effect, and p < 0.0069 for the “confidence and motivation” dimension and d = 0.58 for the “moderate–large” size of the effect. (4) Conclusions: The results are similar to those obtained in other studies in the scope of the 4 dimensions studied, thus coming to the conclusion that the perception of the nursing students on learning through clinical simulation is positive and favourable. Full article
Article
Simulated Video Consultations as a Learning Tool in Undergraduate Nursing: Students’ Perceptions
Healthcare 2020, 8(3), 280; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8030280 - 20 Aug 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1987
Abstract
Simulated video consultations, a teaching tool based on high-fidelity simulations, were implemented in response to the necessary adaptation of high-fidelity clinical simulation sessions to the online or virtual modality during the university closure due to the COVID-19 confinement. The purpose of our study [...] Read more.
Simulated video consultations, a teaching tool based on high-fidelity simulations, were implemented in response to the necessary adaptation of high-fidelity clinical simulation sessions to the online or virtual modality during the university closure due to the COVID-19 confinement. The purpose of our study was to explore the undergraduate nursing students’ satisfaction and perceptions about simulated video consultations using the high-fidelity simulation methodology. A mixed-method was utilized with 93 undergraduate nursing students using a validated satisfaction questionnaire (quantitative data), which included an observations section (qualitative data). Of the total sample, 97.8% of the students expressed a high overall satisfaction with simulated video consultations, highlighting their practical utility and positive learning outcomes. From the students’ comments, two main themes and their related categories emerged: advantages (satisfaction and enjoyment, learning, and calmness during simulated scenarios), and disadvantages (technical issues and technical skills development). Simulated video consultations may be considered as one more high-fidelity simulation teaching option. Nursing students should be trained in this modality of healthcare to face the challenge brought on by its increased use in healthcare services, beyond the specific adaptation of clinical simulation sessions due to the closure of universities during this pandemic. Full article
Article
Using High-Fidelity Simulation to Introduce Communication Skills about End-of-Life to Novice Nursing Students
Healthcare 2020, 8(3), 238; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8030238 - 29 Jul 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1077
Abstract
Background: High-fidelity simulation is being considered as a suitable environment for imparting the skills needed to deal with end-of-life (EOL) situations. The objective was to evaluate an EOL simulation project that introduced communication skills to nursing students who had not yet begun [...] Read more.
Background: High-fidelity simulation is being considered as a suitable environment for imparting the skills needed to deal with end-of-life (EOL) situations. The objective was to evaluate an EOL simulation project that introduced communication skills to nursing students who had not yet begun their training in real healthcare environments. Methods: A sequential approach was used. The “questionnaire for the evaluation of the end-of-life project” was employed. Results: A total of 130 students participated. Increasing the time spent in high-fidelity simulation significantly favored the exploration of feelings and fears regarding EOL (t = −2.37, p = 0.019), encouraged dialogue (t = −2.23, p = 0.028) and increased the acquisition of communication skills (t = −2.32, p = 0.022). Conclusions: High-fidelity simulation promotes communication skills related to EOL in novice nursing students. Full article
Article
Korean Nursing Students’ First Experiences of Clinical Practice in Psychiatric Nursing: A Phenomenological Study
Healthcare 2020, 8(3), 215; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8030215 - 17 Jul 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1049
Abstract
Nursing students have a more negative attitude toward psychiatric practice than other practices. In particular, Korean nursing students experience increased pressure during clinical practice in psychiatric nursing due to sociocultural and institutional influences, such as prejudices, fear, and anxiety towards mental illnesses. This [...] Read more.
Nursing students have a more negative attitude toward psychiatric practice than other practices. In particular, Korean nursing students experience increased pressure during clinical practice in psychiatric nursing due to sociocultural and institutional influences, such as prejudices, fear, and anxiety towards mental illnesses. This study aimed to conduct an investigation on students’ first experiences of clinical practice in psychiatric nursing. Participants were 12 fourth year nursing students in South Korea. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews, and data analysis was done using Colaizzi’s phenomenological method. The students’ experiences of clinical practice in psychiatric nursing could be categorized into emotional fluctuation, burnout, transformation, and growth. The results of this study show that nursing students experienced emotional fluctuation and burnout at the beginning of their clinical practice in psychiatric nursing. At the end of the clinical practice, they experienced transformation and growth. The study suggests that nursing instructors and on-site staff need to interact with nursing students to understand the nature of these first experiences and support them through teaching and field guidance. Full article
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