Special Issue "Clinical Simulation in Health Sciences"

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Nursing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 24 October 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Cesar Leal-Costa
Website
Guest Editor
Nursing Faculty, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain
Interests: Nursing
Dr. José Luis Díaz Agea
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Nursing, Catholic University of Murcia, 30107 Guadalupe, Spain
Interests: Nursing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue encompassing all areas of applications and research in healthcare simulation technology and reflects its mission to advance the science of healthcare simulation. The journal is relevant to a broad range of health professionals. Priority will be given to research results related to safety and quality-oriented training programs, the development of educational and competency assessments, and reports of experience in the use of simulation technology and virtual reality.

Dr. Cesar Leal-Costa
Dr. José Luis Díaz Agea
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Clinical simulation
  • Safety and quality-oriented training programs
  • Development of educational and competency assessment
  • Non-technical skills, clinical skills
  • Innovative teaching/learning strategies using simulation
  • Clinical and academic uses of simulation
  • Leadership for simulation
  • Virtual reality

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Developing an Innovative Medical Training Simulation Device for Peripheral Venous Access: A User-Centered Design Approach
Healthcare 2020, 8(4), 420; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040420 - 22 Oct 2020
Abstract
Nurses and other health students may lack the proper time for training procedural tasks, such as peripheral venous access. There is a need to develop these abilities in novices so that errors can be avoided when treating real patients. Nonetheless, from an experiential [...] Read more.
Nurses and other health students may lack the proper time for training procedural tasks, such as peripheral venous access. There is a need to develop these abilities in novices so that errors can be avoided when treating real patients. Nonetheless, from an experiential point of view, the simulation devices offered in the market do not always make sense for educators and trainees. This could make the adoption of new technology difficult. The purpose of this case study is to describe the development of an innovative simulation device and to propose concrete tactics for the involvement of the educators and trainees. We used a participative design based approach, with an ethnographic basis, where incremental cycles of user testing, development and iteration were involved. The study showcases methods from the field of design and anthropology that can be used to develop future simulation devices that resonate with students and educators to achieve a long term learning experience. Results could shed a light on new ways for the involvement of educators and students to create devices that resonate with them, making learning significant and effective. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Simulation in Health Sciences)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Nursing Students’ Perception on the Effectiveness of Emergency Competence Learning through Simulation
Healthcare 2020, 8(4), 397; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8040397 - 13 Oct 2020
Abstract
(1) Background: Simulation is a part of the day-to-day of the learning method in health sciences. The objective is to determine if the clinical simulation is useful for learning in the emergency setting, from the point of view of the nursing students. [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Simulation is a part of the day-to-day of the learning method in health sciences. The objective is to determine if the clinical simulation is useful for learning in the emergency setting, from the point of view of the nursing students. (2) Methods: A pre- and post-test exploratory study with an analytical and quasi-experimental design was used. The population is made up of nursing students from the Seville Red Cross Nursing Centre, who conducted a simulation exercise in the form of a drill for the care of multiple victims. A specific questionnaire was employed as a tool to analyse the dimensions of satisfaction, confidence and motivation, clinical experience, and decision making and technical abilities. (3) Results: There were favourable significant differences in the set of global responses, with p < 0.0001 for the “satisfaction” dimension and d = 1.25 for the “large” size of the effect, and p < 0.0069 for the “confidence and motivation” dimension and d = 0.58 for the “moderate–large” size of the effect. (4) Conclusions: The results are similar to those obtained in other studies in the scope of the 4 dimensions studied, thus coming to the conclusion that the perception of the nursing students on learning through clinical simulation is positive and favourable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Simulation in Health Sciences)
Open AccessArticle
Simulated Video Consultations as a Learning Tool in Undergraduate Nursing: Students’ Perceptions
Healthcare 2020, 8(3), 280; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8030280 - 20 Aug 2020
Abstract
Simulated video consultations, a teaching tool based on high-fidelity simulations, were implemented in response to the necessary adaptation of high-fidelity clinical simulation sessions to the online or virtual modality during the university closure due to the COVID-19 confinement. The purpose of our study [...] Read more.
Simulated video consultations, a teaching tool based on high-fidelity simulations, were implemented in response to the necessary adaptation of high-fidelity clinical simulation sessions to the online or virtual modality during the university closure due to the COVID-19 confinement. The purpose of our study was to explore the undergraduate nursing students’ satisfaction and perceptions about simulated video consultations using the high-fidelity simulation methodology. A mixed-method was utilized with 93 undergraduate nursing students using a validated satisfaction questionnaire (quantitative data), which included an observations section (qualitative data). Of the total sample, 97.8% of the students expressed a high overall satisfaction with simulated video consultations, highlighting their practical utility and positive learning outcomes. From the students’ comments, two main themes and their related categories emerged: advantages (satisfaction and enjoyment, learning, and calmness during simulated scenarios), and disadvantages (technical issues and technical skills development). Simulated video consultations may be considered as one more high-fidelity simulation teaching option. Nursing students should be trained in this modality of healthcare to face the challenge brought on by its increased use in healthcare services, beyond the specific adaptation of clinical simulation sessions due to the closure of universities during this pandemic. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Simulation in Health Sciences)
Open AccessArticle
Using High-Fidelity Simulation to Introduce Communication Skills about End-of-Life to Novice Nursing Students
Healthcare 2020, 8(3), 238; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8030238 - 29 Jul 2020
Abstract
Background: High-fidelity simulation is being considered as a suitable environment for imparting the skills needed to deal with end-of-life (EOL) situations. The objective was to evaluate an EOL simulation project that introduced communication skills to nursing students who had not yet begun [...] Read more.
Background: High-fidelity simulation is being considered as a suitable environment for imparting the skills needed to deal with end-of-life (EOL) situations. The objective was to evaluate an EOL simulation project that introduced communication skills to nursing students who had not yet begun their training in real healthcare environments. Methods: A sequential approach was used. The “questionnaire for the evaluation of the end-of-life project” was employed. Results: A total of 130 students participated. Increasing the time spent in high-fidelity simulation significantly favored the exploration of feelings and fears regarding EOL (t = −2.37, p = 0.019), encouraged dialogue (t = −2.23, p = 0.028) and increased the acquisition of communication skills (t = −2.32, p = 0.022). Conclusions: High-fidelity simulation promotes communication skills related to EOL in novice nursing students. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Simulation in Health Sciences)
Open AccessArticle
Korean Nursing Students’ First Experiences of Clinical Practice in Psychiatric Nursing: A Phenomenological Study
Healthcare 2020, 8(3), 215; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8030215 - 17 Jul 2020
Abstract
Nursing students have a more negative attitude toward psychiatric practice than other practices. In particular, Korean nursing students experience increased pressure during clinical practice in psychiatric nursing due to sociocultural and institutional influences, such as prejudices, fear, and anxiety towards mental illnesses. This [...] Read more.
Nursing students have a more negative attitude toward psychiatric practice than other practices. In particular, Korean nursing students experience increased pressure during clinical practice in psychiatric nursing due to sociocultural and institutional influences, such as prejudices, fear, and anxiety towards mental illnesses. This study aimed to conduct an investigation on students’ first experiences of clinical practice in psychiatric nursing. Participants were 12 fourth year nursing students in South Korea. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews, and data analysis was done using Colaizzi’s phenomenological method. The students’ experiences of clinical practice in psychiatric nursing could be categorized into emotional fluctuation, burnout, transformation, and growth. The results of this study show that nursing students experienced emotional fluctuation and burnout at the beginning of their clinical practice in psychiatric nursing. At the end of the clinical practice, they experienced transformation and growth. The study suggests that nursing instructors and on-site staff need to interact with nursing students to understand the nature of these first experiences and support them through teaching and field guidance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Simulation in Health Sciences)
Back to TopTop