Special Issue "Longevity, Well-Being and Developmental and Dynamic Ageing: A Semantic Analysis"

A special issue of Geriatrics (ISSN 2308-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Healthy Aging".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Donatella Rita Petretto
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Education, Philosophy and Psychology, University of Cagliari, Via Università, 40, 09124 Cagliari CA, Italy
Interests: Disability; Ageing; Neuropsychology; Learning Disorders; Intellectual Disabilites
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Roberto Pili
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Worldwide Community on Longevity-Comunità Mondiale della Longevità, Assemini, Italy
Interests: active ageing; genetics; successful ageing; biopsychosocial approach; microbiome

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

During the second part of Twentieth Century, worldwide, there has been an important process of conceptualization on active ageing and healthy ageing, related to the progressive ageing of populations in most countries, the so-called “demographic revolution” or “demographic transition”. We can sort the conceptualization in different groups: American conceptual models, European conceptual models and other conceptual models related to different points of view on ageing. The conceptualization of ageing is strictly related to the anthropological framework at the bottom of it and to the interest to all the phases of the life, but it is also strictly related to semantical choices at the bottom of the conceptual models. In the semantic of ageing we found different words, like active ageing, healthy ageing, successful ageing and so on. There are different variables that make the difference: A focus on subject and subjectivity, the focus on well-being and quality of life as central outcomes, and the sociocultural influences that make some variables more important than others and define the role of the oldest people in society. The aim of the Special Issue is to discuss different variables related to different semantical choices and to propose some critical hints in analysis in this field.

Prof. Dr. Donatella R. Petretto
Dr. Roberto Pili
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geriatrics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Active ageing
  • Longevity
  • Positive ageing
  • Healthy ageing
  • Well-being
  • Quality of life
  • Participation
  • Demographic transition
  • Oldest olds
  • World Health Organization

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Cognitive Plasticity in Young-Old Adults and Old-Old Adults and Its Relationship with Successful Aging
Geriatrics 2018, 3(4), 76; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics3040076 - 29 Oct 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
The general objective of this study was to analyze cognitive plasticity as a variable related to successful aging in a group of young-old adults and old-old adults using the Auditory Verbal Learning Test—Learning Potential (AVLT-LP). Method: A total of 569 persons, with mean [...] Read more.
The general objective of this study was to analyze cognitive plasticity as a variable related to successful aging in a group of young-old adults and old-old adults using the Auditory Verbal Learning Test—Learning Potential (AVLT-LP). Method: A total of 569 persons, with mean age 76.67 years (379 between the ages of 65 and 80 years, and 190 older than age 80). They were assessed with a socio-health questionnaire, with the AVLT-LP, and with the Spanish version of the Mini Mental State Examination. Results: The results showed significant differences on the test, in favor of the younger group, while the over 80 group gave poorer performance and showed less cognitive plasticity. With relation to gender, slight differences appeared in favor of the women, on the first four test trials, but not on the last two, nor in delayed recall or cognitive plasticity. As for cognitive status, the results showed significantly better task performance levels in healthy elders, as well as greater plasticity. Nonetheless, certain persons with high plasticity were also found among those with cognitive impairment. Conclusions: The data obtained here offers evidence for the importance of cognitive plasticity in elders and its relation to longevity and successful aging. It also provides information about the influence of variables like age, gender and cognitive status on a verbal memory and plasticity assessment task that is in wide use today. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Associations between Religiosity, Spirituality, and Happiness among Adults Living with Neurological Illness
Geriatrics 2018, 3(3), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics3030035 - 23 Jun 2018
Abstract
The study examined the associations between religiosity, spirituality, and happiness in 354 outpatients suffering from neurological disorders. After accounting for severity of cognitive decline, physical activity level, depression severity, and demographic variables (i.e., subject age, sex, ethnicity, and marital status) multivariate linear regression [...] Read more.
The study examined the associations between religiosity, spirituality, and happiness in 354 outpatients suffering from neurological disorders. After accounting for severity of cognitive decline, physical activity level, depression severity, and demographic variables (i.e., subject age, sex, ethnicity, and marital status) multivariate linear regression revealed a unique association between the Spiritual Well-Being Existential Spirituality scale (SWBS ES), and not the SWBS Religious Scale (SWBS RS), with both the Pemberton Remembered Happiness Index (PHI R) (p < 0.001), and the Pemberton Experienced Happiness Index (PHI E) (p < 0.001). Interventions focused on existential spirituality may improve health related quality of life among adult medical patients with neurological illness. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Risk of Cardiovascular Diseases and Cancer in Later Life: The Role of Age at First Marriage
Geriatrics 2018, 3(2), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics3020027 - 07 Jun 2018
Abstract
The objective of this study was to examine how age at first marriage is related to the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases and cancer in later life. We analyzed longitudinal data from a nationally representative sample of 2129 older adults (born in the [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to examine how age at first marriage is related to the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases and cancer in later life. We analyzed longitudinal data from a nationally representative sample of 2129 older adults (born in the 1940s or earlier) in the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project. We found that for men in this cohort, the age at first marriage that was related to the lowest risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and cancer in later life was the early 30s; men who first married at either younger or older ages had significantly higher odds of experiencing CVD and cancer. Interestingly, for women in this cohort, the age at first marriage was not related to the risk of either CVD or cancer. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Successful Aging: Illness and Social Connections
Geriatrics 2018, 3(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics3010003 - 18 Jan 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
The objective of this study was to examine the role of social determinants of health: gender, income, education, housing, and social connections in successful aging in older adults aging with illness. Participants were 50 adults aged 65–90 years, all aging in place in [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to examine the role of social determinants of health: gender, income, education, housing, and social connections in successful aging in older adults aging with illness. Participants were 50 adults aged 65–90 years, all aging in place in their own home, and reporting at least one illness. This pilot study used non-probability sampling and employed both online and in-person interviews. The majority (82%) were aging “successfully” or “somewhat successfully” as reported on the single item successful aging scale and demonstrated by their scores on the Successful Aging Inventory (SAI). Correlations were not significant between SAI and gender, income, education, or housing. A significant negative correlation was found between SAI and community activity. However, there were significant positive correlations between SAI and religious activity and relationships. The regression model was a linear combination of participants’ community and religious activity and relationships. The majority of older adults aging with illness consider themselves to be aging successfully, but their scores are influenced by relationships with others as well as religious and community activity. Frequent community activity had a suppressor effect on successful aging. Full article

Review

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Open AccessReview
Psychological Wellbeing and Healthy Aging: Focus on Telomeres
Geriatrics 2019, 4(1), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics4010025 - 23 Feb 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Stress and depression are known to modulate the aging process, and might also affect telomere biology. In fact, exposure to some biochemical pathways involved in stress-related depression may contribute to an ‘‘accelerated aging” phenotype, as well as the incidence of age-related diseases, including [...] Read more.
Stress and depression are known to modulate the aging process, and might also affect telomere biology. In fact, exposure to some biochemical pathways involved in stress-related depression may contribute to an ‘‘accelerated aging” phenotype, as well as the incidence of age-related diseases, including metabolic disorders and dementia. Basic studies support the notion that the telomere and telomerase system plays a pivotal role in the aging process and disease promotion. Interestingly, short and dysfunctional telomeres are associated with reduced lifespan, as shown in animal models. In this context, telomeres are very sensitive to stress, mindset, and lifestyle, and their rescue may be sufficient to restore cell and organism viability. This mini-review discusses conceptual models of healthy and active aging and their relationship with telomere biology and mental health. Full article
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