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Cognitive Plasticity in Young-Old Adults and Old-Old Adults and Its Relationship with Successful Aging

1
Department of Personality, Psychological Assessment and Treatment, Faculty of Psychology, University of Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain
2
CIMCYC, Research Center on Mind, Brain and Behavior, University of Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Geriatrics 2018, 3(4), 76; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics3040076
Received: 27 August 2018 / Revised: 24 October 2018 / Accepted: 26 October 2018 / Published: 29 October 2018
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Abstract

The general objective of this study was to analyze cognitive plasticity as a variable related to successful aging in a group of young-old adults and old-old adults using the Auditory Verbal Learning Test—Learning Potential (AVLT-LP). Method: A total of 569 persons, with mean age 76.67 years (379 between the ages of 65 and 80 years, and 190 older than age 80). They were assessed with a socio-health questionnaire, with the AVLT-LP, and with the Spanish version of the Mini Mental State Examination. Results: The results showed significant differences on the test, in favor of the younger group, while the over 80 group gave poorer performance and showed less cognitive plasticity. With relation to gender, slight differences appeared in favor of the women, on the first four test trials, but not on the last two, nor in delayed recall or cognitive plasticity. As for cognitive status, the results showed significantly better task performance levels in healthy elders, as well as greater plasticity. Nonetheless, certain persons with high plasticity were also found among those with cognitive impairment. Conclusions: The data obtained here offers evidence for the importance of cognitive plasticity in elders and its relation to longevity and successful aging. It also provides information about the influence of variables like age, gender and cognitive status on a verbal memory and plasticity assessment task that is in wide use today. View Full-Text
Keywords: cognitive plasticity; successful aging; longevity; Auditory Verbal Learning Test—Learning Potential (AVLT-LP); young-old adults; old-old adults cognitive plasticity; successful aging; longevity; Auditory Verbal Learning Test—Learning Potential (AVLT-LP); young-old adults; old-old adults
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Navarro, E.; Calero, M.D. Cognitive Plasticity in Young-Old Adults and Old-Old Adults and Its Relationship with Successful Aging. Geriatrics 2018, 3, 76.

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