Special Issue "Driving, Aging, Safety and Health"

A special issue of Geriatrics (ISSN 2308-3417).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 January 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Tara Kelley-Baker
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, Washington, DC 20005, USA
Interests: safety; aging; driving; health

Special Issue Information

Although older adults often take considerable steps to ensure their driving safety, many risk being injured or killed in crashes due a variety of aging health conditions. Medical issues, lifestyle choices, medications, and mobility needs, among many other factors, both known and unknown, significantly impact driving safety. Older drivers comprise a significant number of licensed drivers across the globe. Thus, there is a growing need to identify these factors and assess how they impact safety in order to develop responsive countermeasures. 

Potential contributions to this Special Edition of Geriatrics may include studies assessing risks to safe driving created by age-related functional impairments, mental health conditions, medication side-effects, and alcohol and drug use. Additionally, studies are welcomed that investigate protective factors for safe driving, including family and peer support, volunteering/working, physical activity, emerging in-vehicle technologies, and access to alternative mobility.

Dear Colleagues,

I trust this email finds you well, and that you and yours are safe in these unprecedented times.

It is my pleasure to announce that I am currently acting as Guest Editor for a second Special Issue of the journal Geriatrics (https://www.mdpi.com/journal/geriatrics, ISSN 2308-3417) entitled “Driving, Aging, Safety, and Health”.

I am writing to invite you to submit a manuscript to this Special Issue. We are particularly interested in safety and health issues related to aging and driving. Safety may incorporate a broad spectrum of topics that are affected by various health conditions due to aging and impact safe mobility.  

The manuscript may be either a full paper or a communication based on your own research in this area, or it may be a focused review article on some aspect of the subject.

Geriatrics is fully open access. Open access (unlimited and free access by readers) increases publicity and promotes more frequent citations, as indicated by several studies. Open access is supported by the authors and their institutes.

The submission deadline is 15 January, 2021. You may send your manuscript now or up until the deadline. If you require an extension, please get in touch and we will be happy to consider any reasonable requests. Please note, submitted papers should not be under consideration for publication elsewhere. We also encourage authors to send a short abstract or tentative title to the Editorial Office in advance ([email protected]).

For further details on the submission process, please see the instructions for authors at the journal website.

Thank you for the consideration.

Dr. Tara Kelley-Baker
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geriatrics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Safety
  • Aging
  • Driving
  • Health

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Potentially Inappropriate Medication Use and Hard Braking Events in Older Drivers
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics6010020 - 20 Feb 2021
Viewed by 490
Abstract
Potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) identified by the American Geriatrics Society should generally be avoided by older adults because of ineffectiveness or excess risk of adverse effects. Few studies have examined the effects of PIMs on driving safety measured by prospectively and objectively collected [...] Read more.
Potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) identified by the American Geriatrics Society should generally be avoided by older adults because of ineffectiveness or excess risk of adverse effects. Few studies have examined the effects of PIMs on driving safety measured by prospectively and objectively collected driving data. Data for this study came from the Longitudinal Research on Aging Drivers study, a multisite naturalistic driving study of older adults. Multivariable negative binominal modeling was used to estimate incidence rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals of hard braking events (proxies for unsafe driving behavior defined as events with a deceleration rate ≥0.4 g) associated with PIM use among older drivers. The study sample consisted of 2932 drivers aged 65–79 years at baseline, including 542 (18.5%) who used at least one PIM. These drivers were followed through an in-vehicle recording device for up to 44 months. The overall incidence of hard braking events was 1.16 per 1000 miles. Use of PIMs was associated with a 10% increased risk of hard braking events. Compared to drivers who were not using PIMs, the risk of hard braking events increased 6% for those using one PIM, and 24% for those using two or more PIMs. Use of PIMs by older adult drivers is associated in a dose-response fashion with elevated risks of hard braking events. Reducing PIM use in older adults might help improve driving safety as well as health outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Driving, Aging, Safety and Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Investigating On-Road Lane Maintenance and Speed Regulation in Post-Stroke Driving: A Pilot Case–Control Study
Geriatrics 2021, 6(1), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics6010016 - 09 Feb 2021
Viewed by 555
Abstract
Stroke can adversely affect the coordination and judgement of drivers due to executive dysfunction, which is relatively common in the post-stroke population but often undetected. Quantitatively examining vehicle control performance in post-stroke driving becomes essential to inspect whether and where post-stroke older drivers [...] Read more.
Stroke can adversely affect the coordination and judgement of drivers due to executive dysfunction, which is relatively common in the post-stroke population but often undetected. Quantitatively examining vehicle control performance in post-stroke driving becomes essential to inspect whether and where post-stroke older drivers are risky. To date, it is unclear as to which indicators, such as lane keeping or speed control, can differentiate the driving performance of post-stroke older drivers from that of normal (neurotypical) older drivers. By employing a case–control design using advanced vehicle movement tracking and analysis technology, this pilot study aimed to compare the variations in driving trajectory, lane keeping and speed control between the two groups of older drivers using spatial and statistical techniques. The results showed that the mean standard deviation of lane deviation (SDLD) in post-stroke participants was higher than that of normal participants in complex driving tasks (U-turn and left turn) but almost the same in simple driving tasks (straight line sections). No statistically significant differences were found in the speed control performance. The findings indicate that, although older drivers can still drive as they need to after a stroke, the decline in cognitive abilities still imposes a higher cognitive workload and more effort for post-stroke older drivers. Future studies can investigate post-stroke adults’ driving behaviour at more challenging driving scenarios or design driving intervention programs to improve their executive function in driving. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Driving, Aging, Safety and Health)
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Open AccessArticle
The Medical Referral Process and Motor-Vehicle Crash Risk for Drivers with Dementia
Geriatrics 2020, 5(4), 91; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics5040091 - 13 Nov 2020
Viewed by 557
Abstract
Cognitive and physical impairment can occur with dementia and reduce driving ability. In the United States, individual states have procedures to refer and evaluate drivers who may no longer be fit to drive. The license review process is not well understood for drivers [...] Read more.
Cognitive and physical impairment can occur with dementia and reduce driving ability. In the United States, individual states have procedures to refer and evaluate drivers who may no longer be fit to drive. The license review process is not well understood for drivers with dementia. This study uses comprehensive data from the Iowa Department of Transportation to compare the referral process for drivers with and without dementia from January 2014 through November 2019. The likelihood of failing an evaluation test was compared between drivers with and without dementia using logistic regression. The risk of motor-vehicle crash after referral for review of driving ability was compared using a Cox proportional hazard model. Analysis controlled for the age and sex of the referred driver. Drivers with dementia performed worse on all tests evaluated except the visual screening test. After the referral process, the risk of crash was similar between those with and without dementia. Drivers with dementia were denied their license more frequently than referred drivers without dementia. However, drivers with dementia who successfully kept their license as a result of the license review process were not at an increased risk of crash compared to other referred drivers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Driving, Aging, Safety and Health)
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