Remote Sensing, Geophysics and Geosciences for Cultural Heritage and Geoarchaeology

A special issue of Geosciences (ISSN 2076-3263).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2022) | Viewed by 8001

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Italian Space Agency (ASI), Via del Politecnico snc, 00133 Rome, Italy
Interests: earth observation; radar and optical remote sensing; InSAR; time series analysis; Earth Sciences; environmental geology; natural hazards; urban environments; geoheritage; geoconservation; cultural heritage
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Geosciences extends the successful series of Special Issues dedicated to cultural heritage and archaeology, by launching this fourth Special Issue aiming to gather original research articles, reviews, and technical notes, on how remote sensing, geophysics and geoscientific investigation techniques (either well established or recently developed) are used alone or in combination by archaeologists, geologists, image analysts, practitioners, and private companies to:

  • Search for buried features and investigate cropmarks;
  • Understand cultural landscapes and their past use;
  • Predict the archaeological potential in areas where infrastructure and urban development are planned;
  • Assess the condition of archaeological records and cultural heritage assets;
  • Assess natural or human-induced threats to conservation;
  • GIS analysis of past and modern landscapes;
  • Undertake geoarchaeological studies, also in urban environments;
  • Investigate materials and archaeological deposits.

We also encourage you to approach us by sending a short abstract outlining the purpose of the research and the principal results obtained, in order to verify at an early stage if the contribution you intend to submit fits with the objectives of the Special Issue.

Dr. Deodato Tapete
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geosciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Dr. Deodato Tapete
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geosciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

28 pages, 142490 KiB  
Article
Seismic Microzonation of the Pompeii Archaeological Park (Southern Italy): Local Seismic Amplification Factors
by Vincenzo Amato, Marina Covolan, Hélène Dessales and Alfonso Santoriello
Geosciences 2022, 12(7), 275; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences12070275 - 8 Jul 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2328
Abstract
Pompeii Archaeological Park is the best laboratory for the study of the seismic site effects on cultural heritage: the ancient site was destroyed and buried by the 79 AD Vesuvian eruption and, furthermore, it was also affected by the 62–63 AD strong earthquake. [...] Read more.
Pompeii Archaeological Park is the best laboratory for the study of the seismic site effects on cultural heritage: the ancient site was destroyed and buried by the 79 AD Vesuvian eruption and, furthermore, it was also affected by the 62–63 AD strong earthquake. Large sectors of the city were reconstructed after this earthquake while other parts were still under reconstruction when the fall-out and pyroclastic density currents of the eruption buried the Roman city. In order to evaluate the distribution of the damage and reconstructions due to the earthquake, detailed mappings of the structures were carried out using multidisciplinary approaches. In addition, analyses of the topographical features, subsoil stratigraphies, and geophysical surveys, responsible for local seismic amplification (site effects), allow us to define the sectors of the ancient city where the Amplification Factors (AFs) were the main ones responsible for damage. Selected areas and examples of compromised and reconstructed buildings show that the ancient topography and subsoil features (both lithological and seismic) are the main AFs. In particular, the damages caused by the 62–63 AD earthquakes seem to be mainly due to topographical factors such as steep scarps and slopes, ridges, peaks, and terraces, as well as to the major thickness of the soft sediments (loose volcanoclastic layers, paleosols, weathered lavas, and anthropogenic infillings) located over the well-lithified lavas. It is not uncommon to also have the combination of these two factors. For the first time, this multidisciplinary approach allows us to draw a seismic microzonation map for one of the most important archaeological sites of the world. Full article
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21 pages, 18375 KiB  
Article
Uses of Sentinel-1 and -2 Images in Heritage Management: A Case Study from Lednica Landscape Park (Poland)
by Lidia Żuk and Sławomir Królewicz
Geosciences 2022, 12(4), 159; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences12040159 - 1 Apr 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2089
Abstract
This article aims to demonstrate the use of Sentinel images to develop strategies for heritage protection and management in rural landscapes that are currently undergoing dynamic transformations. Construction works are causing rapid and extensive land use changes that threaten archaeological structures. Moreover, the [...] Read more.
This article aims to demonstrate the use of Sentinel images to develop strategies for heritage protection and management in rural landscapes that are currently undergoing dynamic transformations. Construction works are causing rapid and extensive land use changes that threaten archaeological structures. Moreover, the modernisation of farming practices may also negatively affect the efficiency of archaeological prospection. The rapidity of those processes requires the application of relevant tools to monitor changes and highlight negative tendencies in areas surrounding archaeological sites. High frequency of Sentinel-1 and -2′s acquisition may offer an immediate insight into current tendencies. Radar and optical data obtained from those satellites between 2016 and 2020 were analysed to identify trends in building development and land use/cover changes in Lednica Landscape Park. Preliminary results indicate a considerable potential of spectral analysis based on Sentinel-2 to monitor changes related to building development, as well as for the precise planning of a field survey. Sentinel-1 proved more problematic due to a range of factors related to data characteristics and processing. Using those results, we will discuss the potential and limitations of the proposed methodology and data. Full article
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21 pages, 6677 KiB  
Article
SyPEAH: The WebAPP System for Protection and Education to Archaeological Heritage in the Parco Archeologico del Colosseo
by Irma Della Giovampaola
Geosciences 2021, 11(6), 246; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences11060246 - 5 Jun 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2620
Abstract
Archaeological sites are affected by changes due to a natural deterioration process over time. If not prevented, this may compromise the functionality of the cultural property, and in turn become pathological and result in degradation. Monitoring through innovative technologies paves the way towards [...] Read more.
Archaeological sites are affected by changes due to a natural deterioration process over time. If not prevented, this may compromise the functionality of the cultural property, and in turn become pathological and result in degradation. Monitoring through innovative technologies paves the way towards an effective planned maintenance activity and therefore preventive conservation. The monitoring project of the Parco Archeologico del Colosseo was inspired by the desire to build a system of protection and conservation at the service of sustainable exploitation. Established by Ministerial Decree 12 January 2017 in art. 3, the park is an independent cultural site of the Ministry of Culture. It includes the central area of Rome—the Roman Forum, the Palatine, the Colosseum and the Domus Aurea—and has an extension of about 77 hectares, of which about 32 are buildings. With these objectives, the Parco Archeologico del Colosseo has launched a static and dynamic monitoring project consisting of six fundamental levels of activities. The project involves the creation of a multi-parameter system of permanent control of the entire archaeological area, with the associated indicators of the level of risk, for which it is necessary the combined use of innovative technologies. Full article
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