Special Issue "Ten Years after the 2011 Tohoku Tsunami: Social and Environmental Impacts, Lessons Learned, and New Perspectives"

A special issue of Geosciences (ISSN 2076-3263). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural Hazards".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Denys Dutykh
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Mathematics (LAMA UMR 5127), University Savoie Mont Blanc, 73000 Chambéry, France
Interests: tsunami modelling; free surface flows; hydrodynamics; numerical methods; scientific computing
Dr. Amin Rashidi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Mathematics (LAMA UMR 5127), University Savoie Mont Blanc, 73000 Chambéry, France
Interests: tsunami modeling; hydrodynamics; numerical simulation; seismology; subduction zones; marine hazards; hazard assessment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The devastating 2011 Tohoku tsunami was the deadliest and most damaging tsunami after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. Although the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami led to significant progress in Geosciences, the 2011 Tohoku tsunami challenged our knowledge of tsunamis again. It taught us new lessons and proved the need of substantial improvements in seismology and tsunami research. The aim of this Special Issue is to represent new studies and findings of the 2011 Tohoku tsunami and tsunami science in general. Therefore, we welcome submissions of original research on tsunamis and related hazards. These may include but are not limited to the following topics:

1) New studies shedding light on the 2011 Tohoku tsunami;

2) Seismic and non-seismic tsunamigenic sources;

3) Paleo-tsunami research;

4) Tsunami generation modeling;

5) Innovative numerical modeling approaches to tsunami waves;

6) Tsunami hazard and risk assessment and management;

7) Tsunamigenic potential of subduction zones;

8) Social and environmental impacts of tsunamis;

9) Tsunami preparedness and awareness, urban resilience, and post-disaster reconstruction.

High-quality scientific contributions or review articles on other historical or future hypothetical tsunami events in any other part of the world are also welcome in this Special Issue. We are looking forward to evaluating and discussing with you any ideas of potential contributions. Please, do not hesitate to take contact with the Editors of this Special Issue.

Dr. Denys Dutykh
Dr. Amin Rashidi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geosciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Earthquake
  • Tsunami
  • Seismology
  • Tsunami modeling
  • Social and environmental impacts of tsunamis
  • Seismic and tsunami hazard assessment
  • Hazard mitigation

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

Review
The 2011 Tohoku Tsunami from the Sky: A Review on the Evolution of Artificial Intelligence Methods for Damage Assessment
Geosciences 2021, 11(3), 133; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences11030133 - 13 Mar 2021
Viewed by 462
Abstract
The Tohoku tsunami was a devastating event that struck North-East Japan in 2011 and remained in the memory of people worldwide. The amount of devastation was so great that it took years to achieve a proper assessment of the economical and structural damage, [...] Read more.
The Tohoku tsunami was a devastating event that struck North-East Japan in 2011 and remained in the memory of people worldwide. The amount of devastation was so great that it took years to achieve a proper assessment of the economical and structural damage, with the consequences still being felt today. However, this tsunami was also one of the first observed from the sky by modern satellites and aircrafts, thus providing a unique opportunity to exploit these data and train artificial intelligence methods that could help to better handle the aftermath of similar disasters in the future. This paper provides a review of how artificial intelligence methods applied to case studies about the Tohoku tsunami have evolved since 2011. We focus on more than 15 studies that are compared and evaluated in terms of the data they require, the methods used, their degree of automation, their metric performances, and their strengths and weaknesses. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop