Special Issue "Epigenetic Mechanisms for Plant Gene Regulation"

A special issue of Genes (ISSN 2073-4425). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Genetics and Genomics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 May 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Philippe Gallusci
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Univ Bordeaux, INRA, Bordeaux Sci Agro, UMR Ecophysiologie et Génomique Fonctionnelle de la Vigne (EGFV), 210 Chemin de Leysotte, CS 50008 33882 VILLENAVE D'ORNON, France
Interests: plant epigenetic mechanisms; DNA methylation; plant development; plant stress responses; drought; adaptation; fruit development and ripening; metabolism and epigenetic crosstalk
Prof. Dr. Stéphane Maury
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
INRA, EA1207 USC1328 Laboratoire de Biologie des Ligneux et des Grandes Cultures, Université d’Orléans, F-45067 Orléans, France
Interests: plant epigenetic mechanisms; DNA methylation; meristem; phenotypic plasticity; adaptation; drought; phytohormone and chromatin crosstalk
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Epigenetic mechanisms constitute a network of regulatory processes that provide stable and transmittable information to the chromatin beyond the DNA sequence. They involve genomic DNA methylation, post-translational modification of histones, and the synthesis of certain small RNAs. Epigenetic marks have an impact on chromatin organization and thereby contribute to the definition of specific chromatin states and gene expression patterns that are maintained after cell division during tissue and organ development. As such, epigenetic regulations are crucial to the regulation of several plant developmental processes and contribute to the responses of plants to environmental challenges.

The Special Issue “Epigenetic Mechanisms for Plant Gene Regulation” will focus on the analysis of epigenetic mechanisms, their complex interplay, and their contribution to gene regulation and transposon activity during the development of plants and to the response of plants to their environment. Whereas studies in model systems are essential to our understanding of how epigenetic regulation may impact on chromatin and gene expression, those performed on crop plants are also of primary interest as they provide insights into how these mechanisms contribute to phenotypic diversity. In particular, the contribution of epigenetic-mediated gene regulation to specific traits of agronomical importance and its potential use in breeding applications are issues of utmost importance. The importance of the memory that is mediated by epigenetic regulations and their contribution to plant adaptation to stresses will also be considered both in perennial and annual plants. Finally, studies investigating the possible use of epigenetic editing are encouraged as they may provide new strategies to stably modulate gene expression and influence plant phenotypes.

Prof. Dr. Philippe Gallusci
Prof. Dr. Stéphane Maury
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Genes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • epigenetic mechanisms
  • epigenomics
  • DNA methylation
  • post-translational modification of histones
  • small RNAs
  • gene regulation
  • epigenetic memory
  • plant stress response
  • epigenetic editing
  • breeding
  • genetic resources
  • phenotypic diversity and plasticity
  • population epigenomics
  • transposable element
  • epigenetic and hormone crosstalk

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Heterologous Expression of SvMBD5 from Salix viminalis L. Promotes Flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana L.
Genes 2020, 11(3), 285; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes11030285 - 07 Mar 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 940
Abstract
Methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD) proteins have diverse molecular and biological functions in plants. Most studies of MBD proteins in plants have focused on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana L. Here we cloned SvMBD5 from the willow Salix viminalis L. by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction [...] Read more.
Methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD) proteins have diverse molecular and biological functions in plants. Most studies of MBD proteins in plants have focused on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana L. Here we cloned SvMBD5 from the willow Salix viminalis L. by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and analyzed the structure of SvMBD5 and its evolutionary relationships with proteins in other species. The coding sequence of SvMBD5 is 645 bp long, encoding a 214 amino acid protein with a methyl-CpG-binding domain. SvMBD5 belongs to the same subfamily as AtMBD5 and AtMBD6 from Arabidopsis. Subcellular localization analysis showed that SvMBD5 is only expressed in the nucleus. We transformed Arabidopsis plants with a 35S::SvMBD5 expression construct to examine SvMBD5 function. The Arabidopsis SvMBD5-expressing line flowered earlier than the wild type. In the transgenic plants, the expression of FLOWERING LOCUS T and CONSTANS significantly increased, while the expression of FLOWERING LOCUS C greatly decreased. In addition, heterologously expressing SvMBD5 in Arabidopsis significantly inhibited the establishment and maintenance of methylation of CHROMOMETHYLASE 3 and METHYLTRANSFERASE 1, as well as their expression, and significantly increased the expression of the demethylation-related genes REPRESSOR OF SILENCING1 and DEMETER-LIKE PROTEIN3. Our findings suggest that SvMBD5 participates in the flowering process by regulating the methylation levels of flowering genes, laying the foundation for further studying the role of SvMBD5 in regulating DNA demethylation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epigenetic Mechanisms for Plant Gene Regulation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Unwinding BRAHMA Functions in Plants
Genes 2020, 11(1), 90; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes11010090 - 13 Jan 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1465
Abstract
The ATP-dependent Switch/Sucrose non-fermenting (SWI/SNF) chromatin remodeling complex (CRC) regulates the transcription of many genes by destabilizing interactions between DNA and histones. In plants, BRAHMA (BRM), one of the two catalytic ATPase subunits of the complex, is the closest homolog of the yeast [...] Read more.
The ATP-dependent Switch/Sucrose non-fermenting (SWI/SNF) chromatin remodeling complex (CRC) regulates the transcription of many genes by destabilizing interactions between DNA and histones. In plants, BRAHMA (BRM), one of the two catalytic ATPase subunits of the complex, is the closest homolog of the yeast and animal SWI2/SNF2 ATPases. We summarize here the advances describing the roles of BRM in plant development as well as its recently reported chromatin-independent role in pri-miRNA processing in vitro and in vivo. We also enlighten the roles of plant-specific partners that physically interact with BRM. Three main types of partners can be distinguished: (i) DNA-binding proteins such as transcription factors which mostly cooperate with BRM in developmental processes, (ii) enzymes such as kinases or proteasome-related proteins that use BRM as substrate and are often involved in response to abiotic stress, and (iii) an RNA-binding protein which is involved with BRM in chromatin-independent pri-miRNA processing. This overview contributes to the understanding of the central position occupied by BRM within regulatory networks controlling fundamental biological processes in plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epigenetic Mechanisms for Plant Gene Regulation)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop