Transnationalism and Genealogy

A special issue of Genealogy (ISSN 2313-5778).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2019) | Viewed by 32070

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Guest Editor
Department of Sociology and Social Work, Texas Woman's University, Denton, TX 76204, USA
Interests: international migration/immigration; race and ethnicity; Asian Americans; transnationalism; citizenship; population studies; quantitative methodology
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Genealogy invites essays on the topic of “Transnationalism and Genealogy.” Transnationalism is classically defined by anthropologists Basch, Glick Schiller, and Blanc-Szanton (1994, p. 7) as “the processes by which immigrants forge and sustain multi-stranded social relations that link together their societies of origin and settlement.” The goal of this issue is to examine the relationship between transnationalism and genealogy. The impact of transnationalism on family relations, family history, and family lineage across the globe is at the center of this issue.  The editorial team hopes to attract contributions from a wide spectrum of disciplines or sub-disciplines with different theoretical perspectives and various methodological orientations that can broaden and strengthen the scope and depth of genealogical studies. We are particularly interested in articles that address the following issues, although all pertinent submissions are welcome:

  • The impact of immigrant transnationalism on family relations
  • The role of immigrant transnationalism in writing or rewriting family histories
  • The effect of immigrant transnationalism on family lineage
  • The role of transnational marriage in transnational family dynamics
  • Cross-border intra-ethnic, interethnic, and interracial marriages and bloodline
  • The role of transnational adoption in transnational family relations
  • Transnational adoption and lineage
  • Prevalence of transitional families
  • Transnational family arrangements including, but not limited to, transnational parents leaving their children behind, “parachute kids,” and “astronaut” families
  • Transnational motherhood, fatherhood, and childhood, and their differences from traditional motherhood, fatherhood, and childhood
  • Transnational childrearing arrangements
  • Effects of migration policies on transnational families
  • Contexts in the countries of origin and destination and decisions on transnational family separation or reunification
  • Transnational migration and familial naming practices
  • New horizons or insights brought by transnationalism to the field of genealogy

Prof. Dr. Philip Q. Yang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Genealogy is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • transnationalism
  • genealogy
  • family relations
  • family history
  • family lineage
  • transnational marriage
  • transitional families
  • transnational adoption
  • transnational migration

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Editorial

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8 pages, 225 KiB  
Editorial
Title Transnationalism and Genealogy: An Introduction
by Philip Q. Yang
Genealogy 2019, 3(3), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy3030049 - 15 Sep 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3305
Abstract
Transnationalism and genealogy is an emerging subfield of genealogy. The field has witnessed a significant growth in the last two to three decades, especially in the areas of transnationalism and family arrangements, transnational marriage, transnational adoption, transnational parenting, and transnational care for elderly [...] Read more.
Transnationalism and genealogy is an emerging subfield of genealogy. The field has witnessed a significant growth in the last two to three decades, especially in the areas of transnationalism and family arrangements, transnational marriage, transnational adoption, transnational parenting, and transnational care for elderly parents. However, large gaps remain, especially with regard to the impact of transnationalism on lineage. Articles in this Special Issue fill some of the gaps. Additional research is called for. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transnationalism and Genealogy)

Research

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17 pages, 294 KiB  
Article
From Traditional to Transnational: The Chung Family History as a Case Example
by Haiming Liu
Genealogy 2019, 3(3), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy3030046 - 08 Aug 2019
Viewed by 6317
Abstract
A harmonious family of three generations living under one roof is often an assumed image of a Chinese traditional family. In reality, few Chinese families resemble this image. My article uses the Chung family history to illustrate how a family in rural Guangdong, [...] Read more.
A harmonious family of three generations living under one roof is often an assumed image of a Chinese traditional family. In reality, few Chinese families resemble this image. My article uses the Chung family history to illustrate how a family in rural Guangdong, South China, experienced a fast social ascent or descent in one generation. Its history reveals many aspects of Chinese family tradition, such as filial piety, equal inheritance system among sons, or education as an important family agenda. The rise and fall of this family also helps us understand the competitive social environment of Guangdong that sent hundreds of thousand immigrants overseas in the mid-nineteenth and early twentieth century. When some members of the Chung family migrated overseas, other members followed. The Chung lineage, similar to numerous Cantonese immigrant families in America, became transnational in culture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transnationalism and Genealogy)
19 pages, 274 KiB  
Article
Challenges and Strategies for Promoting Children’s Education: A Comparative Analysis of Chinese Immigrant Parenting in the United States and Singapore
by Min Zhou and Jun Wang
Genealogy 2019, 3(2), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy3020020 - 15 Apr 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 7211
Abstract
Confucian heritage culture holds that a good education is the path to upward social mobility as well as the road to realizing an individual’s fullest potential in life. In both China and Chinese diasporic communities around the world, education is of utmost importance [...] Read more.
Confucian heritage culture holds that a good education is the path to upward social mobility as well as the road to realizing an individual’s fullest potential in life. In both China and Chinese diasporic communities around the world, education is of utmost importance and is central to childrearing in the family. In this paper, we address one of the most serious resettlement issues that new Chinese immigrants face—children’s education. We examine how receiving contexts matter for parenting, what immigrant parents do to promote their children’s education, and what enables parenting strategies to yield expected outcomes. Our analysis is based mainly on data collected from face-to-face interviews and participant observations in Chinese immigrant communities in Los Angeles and New York in the United States and in Singapore. We find that, despite different contexts of reception, new Chinese immigrant parents hold similar views and expectations on children’s education, are equally concerned about achievement outcomes, and tend to adopt overbearing parenting strategies. We also find that, while the Chinese way of parenting is severely contested in the processes of migration and adaptation, the success in promoting children’s educational excellence involves not only the right set of culturally specific strategies but also tangible support from host-society institutions and familial and ethnic social networks. We discuss implications and unintended consequences of overbearing parenting. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transnationalism and Genealogy)
20 pages, 314 KiB  
Article
Facebook and WhatsApp as Elements in Transnational Care Chains for the Trinidadian Diaspora
by Dwaine Plaza and Lauren Plaza
Genealogy 2019, 3(2), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy3020015 - 02 Apr 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 4501
Abstract
Despite being separated by great geographical distances, the Trinidadian Diaspora community has managed to stay in regular communication with those back “home” using the latest available technologies. Trinidadian migrants living abroad have established multi-directional care chains with family, kin, and friends that have [...] Read more.
Despite being separated by great geographical distances, the Trinidadian Diaspora community has managed to stay in regular communication with those back “home” using the latest available technologies. Trinidadian migrants living abroad have established multi-directional care chains with family, kin, and friends that have endured for decades. This social connection has evolved from letter writing, telegrams, telephones, emails, and most recently, internet-based social media which includes: Facebook, WhatsApp, Skype, Facetime, Snapchat, Twitter, and Google Hangout. This paper examines how social media, focusing on Facebook and WhatsApp, are tools being used by the Trinidadian Diaspora to provide transnational care-giving to family and friends kin left behind in the “home” country and beyond. The analysis is based on the results of two online Qualtrics surveys, one implemented in 2012 (n = 150) and another in 2015 (n = 100) of Trinidadian Diaspora participants and in-depth interviews with (n = 10) Canadian-Trinidadians. This paper explores how social media have become a virtual transnational bridge that connects the Trinidadian Diaspora across long distances and provides family members with a feeling of psychological well-being. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transnationalism and Genealogy)

Other

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14 pages, 338 KiB  
Creative
I Have an Accent in Every Language I Speak!”: Shadow History of One Chinese Family’s Multigenerational Transnational Migrations
by Jenny Banh
Genealogy 2019, 3(3), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy3030036 - 01 Jul 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 5332 | Correction
Abstract
According to scholar and Professor Wang Gungwu, there are three categories of Chinese overseas documents: formal (archive), practical (print media), and expressive (migrant writings such as poetry). This non-fiction creative essay documents what Edna Bonacich describes as an “middleman minority” family and how [...] Read more.
According to scholar and Professor Wang Gungwu, there are three categories of Chinese overseas documents: formal (archive), practical (print media), and expressive (migrant writings such as poetry). This non-fiction creative essay documents what Edna Bonacich describes as an “middleman minority” family and how we have migrated to four different nation-city states in four generations. Our double minority status in one country where we were discriminated against helped us psychologically survive in another country. My family history ultimately exemplifies the unique position “middleman minority” families have in the countries they migrate to and how the resulting discrimination that often accompanies this position can work as a psychological advantage when going to a new country. We also used our cultural capital to survive in each new country. In particular, this narrative highlights the lasting psychological effects of the transnational migration on future generations. There is a wall of shame, fear, and traumas in my family’s migration story that still pervades today. My family deals with everything with silence, obfuscation, and anger. It has taken me twenty years to recollect a story so my own descendants can know where we came from. Thus, this is a shadow history that will add to the literature on Sino-Southeast Asian migration and remigration out to the United States. Specifically, my family’s migration began with my grandfather leaving Guangdong, China to Saigon, Vietnam (1935), to Hong Kong, (1969) (then a British Colony), and eventually to the United States (1975). This article explains why my family migrated multiple times across multiple generations before eventually ending up in California. Professor Wang urges librarians, archivists, and scholars to document and preserve the Chinese migrants’ expressive desires of migrant experiences and this expressive memoir piece answers that call. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transnationalism and Genealogy)
15 pages, 254 KiB  
Perspective
Emancipating the “Kin beyond the Sea”: Reciprocity between Continental and Diasporic Africans’ Struggles for Freedom
by Angellar Manguvo
Genealogy 2019, 3(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy3010012 - 20 Mar 2019
Viewed by 4342
Abstract
While the African Diaspora’s relentless commitment to the liberation of Africa from colonial bondage is well documented, the literature has, arguably, obscured the profound inspirations that Continental African people have had on Black Americans’ struggles against racism. Unfortunately, the downplaying of the pivotal [...] Read more.
While the African Diaspora’s relentless commitment to the liberation of Africa from colonial bondage is well documented, the literature has, arguably, obscured the profound inspirations that Continental African people have had on Black Americans’ struggles against racism. Unfortunately, the downplaying of the pivotal role of the forces from Continental Africa divorces the understanding of the interconnectedness of transnational black consciousness. This paper contributes a greater balance to the understanding of black racial solidarity by discussing the formation and sustenance of the interrelationships between Continental African people and the African Diaspora, particularly in the United States, during the struggles of anti-colonialism in Africa and anti-racism in the United States, dating back to the turn of the 19th century. The paper conceptualizes the interconnectedness of the twin struggles from the Cross-national Diffusion theoretical framework. The theory offers appealing explanations and insights to the apparent mutuality regarding the formation, processes, outcomes, and consequences of the twin struggles. Galvanized by the common vision of emancipating the black race, the two movements were inspired by the exchange of ideological and organizational tactics, of which the exchange itself constituted another solid ideological tactic. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transnationalism and Genealogy)
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