Special Issue "Transnationalism and Genealogy"

A special issue of Genealogy (ISSN 2313-5778).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2019)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Philip Q. Yang

Department of Sociology and Social Work, Texas Woman’s University, P.O. Box 425887, Denton, TX 76204, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: International migration/immigration; race and ethnicity; transnationalism; citizenship; family history and relations; Asian Americans; population studies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Genealogy invites essays on the topic of “Transnationalism and Genealogy.” Transnationalism is classically defined by anthropologists Basch, Glick Schiller, and Blanc-Szanton (1994, p. 7) as “the processes by which immigrants forge and sustain multi-stranded social relations that link together their societies of origin and settlement.” The goal of this issue is to examine the relationship between transnationalism and genealogy. The impact of transnationalism on family relations, family history, and family lineage across the globe is at the center of this issue.  The editorial team hopes to attract contributions from a wide spectrum of disciplines or sub-disciplines with different theoretical perspectives and various methodological orientations that can broaden and strengthen the scope and depth of genealogical studies. We are particularly interested in articles that address the following issues, although all pertinent submissions are welcome:

  • The impact of immigrant transnationalism on family relations
  • The role of immigrant transnationalism in writing or rewriting family histories
  • The effect of immigrant transnationalism on family lineage
  • The role of transnational marriage in transnational family dynamics
  • Cross-border intra-ethnic, interethnic, and interracial marriages and bloodline
  • The role of transnational adoption in transnational family relations
  • Transnational adoption and lineage
  • Prevalence of transitional families
  • Transnational family arrangements including, but not limited to, transnational parents leaving their children behind, “parachute kids,” and “astronaut” families
  • Transnational motherhood, fatherhood, and childhood, and their differences from traditional motherhood, fatherhood, and childhood
  • Transnational childrearing arrangements
  • Effects of migration policies on transnational families
  • Contexts in the countries of origin and destination and decisions on transnational family separation or reunification
  • Transnational migration and familial naming practices
  • New horizons or insights brought by transnationalism to the field of genealogy

Prof. Dr. Philip Q. Yang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Genealogy is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • transnationalism
  • genealogy
  • family relations
  • family history
  • family lineage
  • transnational marriage
  • transitional families
  • transnational adoption
  • transnational migration

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Challenges and Strategies for Promoting Children’s Education: A Comparative Analysis of Chinese Immigrant Parenting in the United States and Singapore
Received: 18 February 2019 / Revised: 27 March 2019 / Accepted: 11 April 2019 / Published: 15 April 2019
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Abstract
Confucian heritage culture holds that a good education is the path to upward social mobility as well as the road to realizing an individual’s fullest potential in life. In both China and Chinese diasporic communities around the world, education is of utmost importance [...] Read more.
Confucian heritage culture holds that a good education is the path to upward social mobility as well as the road to realizing an individual’s fullest potential in life. In both China and Chinese diasporic communities around the world, education is of utmost importance and is central to childrearing in the family. In this paper, we address one of the most serious resettlement issues that new Chinese immigrants face—children’s education. We examine how receiving contexts matter for parenting, what immigrant parents do to promote their children’s education, and what enables parenting strategies to yield expected outcomes. Our analysis is based mainly on data collected from face-to-face interviews and participant observations in Chinese immigrant communities in Los Angeles and New York in the United States and in Singapore. We find that, despite different contexts of reception, new Chinese immigrant parents hold similar views and expectations on children’s education, are equally concerned about achievement outcomes, and tend to adopt overbearing parenting strategies. We also find that, while the Chinese way of parenting is severely contested in the processes of migration and adaptation, the success in promoting children’s educational excellence involves not only the right set of culturally specific strategies but also tangible support from host-society institutions and familial and ethnic social networks. We discuss implications and unintended consequences of overbearing parenting. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transnationalism and Genealogy)
Open AccessArticle
Facebook and WhatsApp as Elements in Transnational Care Chains for the Trinidadian Diaspora
Received: 4 February 2019 / Revised: 18 March 2019 / Accepted: 27 March 2019 / Published: 2 April 2019
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Abstract
Despite being separated by great geographical distances, the Trinidadian Diaspora community has managed to stay in regular communication with those back “home” using the latest available technologies. Trinidadian migrants living abroad have established multi-directional care chains with family, kin, and friends that have [...] Read more.
Despite being separated by great geographical distances, the Trinidadian Diaspora community has managed to stay in regular communication with those back “home” using the latest available technologies. Trinidadian migrants living abroad have established multi-directional care chains with family, kin, and friends that have endured for decades. This social connection has evolved from letter writing, telegrams, telephones, emails, and most recently, internet-based social media which includes: Facebook, WhatsApp, Skype, Facetime, Snapchat, Twitter, and Google Hangout. This paper examines how social media, focusing on Facebook and WhatsApp, are tools being used by the Trinidadian Diaspora to provide transnational care-giving to family and friends kin left behind in the “home” country and beyond. The analysis is based on the results of two online Qualtrics surveys, one implemented in 2012 (n = 150) and another in 2015 (n = 100) of Trinidadian Diaspora participants and in-depth interviews with (n = 10) Canadian-Trinidadians. This paper explores how social media have become a virtual transnational bridge that connects the Trinidadian Diaspora across long distances and provides family members with a feeling of psychological well-being. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transnationalism and Genealogy)

Other

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Open AccessPerspective
Emancipating the “Kin beyond the Sea”: Reciprocity between Continental and Diasporic Africans’ Struggles for Freedom
Received: 31 January 2019 / Revised: 6 March 2019 / Accepted: 17 March 2019 / Published: 20 March 2019
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Abstract
While the African Diaspora’s relentless commitment to the liberation of Africa from colonial bondage is well documented, the literature has, arguably, obscured the profound inspirations that Continental African people have had on Black Americans’ struggles against racism. Unfortunately, the downplaying of the pivotal [...] Read more.
While the African Diaspora’s relentless commitment to the liberation of Africa from colonial bondage is well documented, the literature has, arguably, obscured the profound inspirations that Continental African people have had on Black Americans’ struggles against racism. Unfortunately, the downplaying of the pivotal role of the forces from Continental Africa divorces the understanding of the interconnectedness of transnational black consciousness. This paper contributes a greater balance to the understanding of black racial solidarity by discussing the formation and sustenance of the interrelationships between Continental African people and the African Diaspora, particularly in the United States, during the struggles of anti-colonialism in Africa and anti-racism in the United States, dating back to the turn of the 19th century. The paper conceptualizes the interconnectedness of the twin struggles from the Cross-national Diffusion theoretical framework. The theory offers appealing explanations and insights to the apparent mutuality regarding the formation, processes, outcomes, and consequences of the twin struggles. Galvanized by the common vision of emancipating the black race, the two movements were inspired by the exchange of ideological and organizational tactics, of which the exchange itself constituted another solid ideological tactic. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transnationalism and Genealogy)
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