Storying Indigenous (Life)Worlds

A special issue of Genealogy (ISSN 2313-5778).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 May 2021) | Viewed by 21363

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Anthropology, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469, USA
Interests: indigeneity; environmental justice; indigenous science; research ethics; climate justice

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Anthropology, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA 22807, USA
Interests: political ecology; political ontology; postcolonial studies; critical climate change studies; environmental justice; indigenous studies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Focus:

The aim of this Genealogy Special Issue is to critically reflect on storytelling from, with, and for alternative (life)worlds and to create a space in which these stories can gather. We are looking for critically engaged scholarship and research from Indigenous peoples, with Indigenous communities, and/or for liberated Indigenous ecologies/worlds that theoretically or empirically contribute to the theme of Storytelling Indigenous (Life)Worlds. More specifically, we invite scholarship that engages with storytelling related to Indigenous ways of knowing, being, and doing in critically reflexive and productive ways that serve to disrupt or unsettle settler/colonial narratives and worlding practices and provide stories that compose more livable worlds.  

Scope:

As a basic definition, we take the term “Indigenous” to refer to groups “with ancestral and often spiritual ties to a particular land, and whose ancestors held that land prior to colonization by outside powers, and whose nations remain submerged within the states created by those powers” (Shaw, Herman and Dobbs, 2006: 268). This definition is taken as fluid and non-essentializing in that we encourage stories from, with, and for an inclusive conceptualization of Indigenous peoples that recognizes the varied names and labels ascribed to those oppressed by colonization and the structural continuity of coloniality (including: Natives, Indigenous, autochthonous, tribal peoples, peasants, forest dwellers, or ethnic minorities). Thus, for this Special Issue, we seek contributions from settler society contexts, as well as from beyond this situated geolocation to include life and earth stories from, with and for Indigenous and more-than-human worlds.

Purpose and Literature Supplement:

The scope of the Special Issue will focus on three central themes: (1) storying worlds otherwise, (2) storytelling as political intervention, and (3) decolonial and ethical approaches for storying Indigenous worlds. It will seek to address the following interrelated questions to expand the literature on storytelling, indigeneity, and their related epistemologies:

  1. When and for what ends is storytelling needed as opposed to knowledge practices of “actual representation”?
  2. How does storytelling allow for an alternative knowledge practice that is perhaps a less oppressive or more open regime of truth?
  3. How might storytelling Indigenous lifeways enable a practice of “writing against culture”?
  4. How can storytelling avoid colonial knowledge practices (i.e., a “western gaze”) and in what ways might it reproduce them? 
  5. What are the ethics of storytelling in research and how does authority, positionality, intersubjectivity, risk, extractive, patriarchal, (re)presentation, and reciprocity play into this ethics? 
  6. What is the relationship between Indigenous methodologies and storying of Indigenous lifeways?
  7. We are particularly interested in submissions that provide examples of “Rupture Storying”, i.e., auto- or experimental–ethnographic accounts that illuminate ways of knowing and being otherwise to that of colonial-modernist and settler-colonial onto-epistemologies.
  8. How do stories produce domination and how do they work as resistance to forms of domination?
  9. How does storytelling engage the political? What interventions do stories make?
  10.  How can storytelling allow for alternative possibilities, or alternative co-emergences (realities) to that of the “authorized” reality?

Dr. Darren J. Ranco
Dr. Jamie Haverkamp
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Genealogy is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • indigeneity
  • storytelling
  • Indigenous knowledge and epistemologies
  • more-than-human environments
  • environmental justice
  • traditional ecological knowledge

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research

9 pages, 238 KiB  
Editorial
Storying Indigenous (Life)Worlds: An Introduction
by Darren Ranco and Jamie Haverkamp
Genealogy 2022, 6(2), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy6020025 - 28 Mar 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2621
Abstract
Without stories, we have no way of connecting what it means to be human with the pathway of our existence [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Storying Indigenous (Life)Worlds)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

55 pages, 2632 KiB  
Article
Wahi Pana Aloha ʻĀina: Storied Places of Resistance as Political Intervention
by Keahialaka Waikaʻalulu Ioane
Genealogy 2022, 6(1), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy6010007 - 17 Jan 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 4674
Abstract
Wahi pana aloha ʻāina, storied places of resistance, is a historical and political research device that perpetuates contemporary Hawaiian sovereignty history, and can serve as a political intervention between Kanaka (Hawaiian people) and the State of Hawaiʻi. Wahi pana aloha ʻāina are places [...] Read more.
Wahi pana aloha ʻāina, storied places of resistance, is a historical and political research device that perpetuates contemporary Hawaiian sovereignty history, and can serve as a political intervention between Kanaka (Hawaiian people) and the State of Hawaiʻi. Wahi pana aloha ʻāina are places where movements and resistance in the name of aloha ʻāina occur. Aloha ʻāina is a founding quintessential concept to a Hawaiian worldview and epistemology. The genealogy of aloha ʻāina traditions, equipped generations of Kanaka with environmental keenness through a deep love for and connection to the land. During the illegal overthrow of the Kingdom of Hawaiʻi in the 1890s, aloha ʻāina became the political identity of Kanaka in the struggle for sovereignty of Hawaiʻi during the illegal encroachment by the United States. In the 1970’s during the Hawaiian renaissance (cultural re-awakening), leaders of the Protect Kahoʻolawe ʻOhana (the group who organized the first contemporary resistance by Kanaka against the U.S.) re-discovered and reclaimed aloha ʻāina to re-awaken the Hawaiian consciousness after decades of imposed American indoctrination. The Hawaiian renaissance led to a series of land movements that arose in opposition to America’s control of Hawaiian lands and became the basis for the Hawaiian Sovereignty Movement, or, the current Hawaiian political movement for better self-determination and the return of Hawaiʻi’s sovereignty to Kanaka. This legacy of storied places of resistance has been effectively written over by colonial historiography and the State of Hawaii’s legacy of American expansionism. This has manifested into a legacy of prejudice in the State of Hawaiʻi judicial system that favors non-Kanaka entities, initiatives and agendas, while disapproving and discrediting Kanaka self-determination initiatives and sovereignty agendas. Due to this, there is no concern from the State of Hawaiʻi in remedying the political conflicts that arise between Kanaka and the State. I argue that the normalization of wahi pana aloha ʻāina, can assist Kanaka in overcoming the negative impact of the colonial footprint of the State of Hawaiʻi over Kanaka ancestral legacies and land histories, and be used to reclaim Kanaka land rights. In this paper, I lay out the research behind the theory of wahi pana aloha ʻāina, and how it functions as a research tool in the field of Kanaka land struggles, with a specific focus on historical colonial resistance. Second, I exemplify the use of wahi pana aloha ʻāina through telling the story of the wahi pana aloha ʻāina of my own moʻokūʻauhau (genealogy) in Keaukaha on the Big Island of Hawaiʻi, and how my family and community maintain our moʻokūʻauhau and kuleana (rights/privilege/responsibility) through the practice of perpetuating wahi pana aloha ʻāina. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Storying Indigenous (Life)Worlds)
Show Figures

Figure 1

10 pages, 207 KiB  
Article
In Conversation with the Ancestors: Indigenizing Archaeological Narratives at Acadia National Park, Maine
by Bonnie Newsom, Natalie Dana Lolar and Isaac St. John
Genealogy 2021, 5(4), 96; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy5040096 - 3 Nov 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 4226
Abstract
In North America, Indigenous pasts are publicly understood through narratives constructed by archaeologists who bring Western ideologies to bear on their inquiries. The resulting Eurocentric presentations of Indigenous pasts shape public perceptions of Indigenous peoples and influence Indigenous perceptions of self and of [...] Read more.
In North America, Indigenous pasts are publicly understood through narratives constructed by archaeologists who bring Western ideologies to bear on their inquiries. The resulting Eurocentric presentations of Indigenous pasts shape public perceptions of Indigenous peoples and influence Indigenous perceptions of self and of archaeology. In this paper we confront Eurocentric narratives of Indigenous pasts, specifically Wabanaki pasts, by centering an archaeological story on relationality between contemporary and past Indigenous peoples. We focus on legacy archaeological collections and eroding heritage sites in Acadia National Park, Maine. We present the “Red Paint People” myth as an example of how Indigenous pasts become distorted through archaeological narratives influenced by Western ideologies and offer a framework for indigenizing archaeological narratives constructed previously through Western lenses, using Indigenous language and community engagement to carry out the study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Storying Indigenous (Life)Worlds)
28 pages, 4288 KiB  
Article
Wounaan Storying as Intervention: Storywork in the Crafting of a Multimodal Illustrated Story Book on People and Birds
by Rito Ismare Peña, Chenier Carpio Opua, Doris Cheucarama Membache, Frankie Grin, Dorindo Membora Peña, Chindío Peña Ismare and Julie Velásquez Runk
Genealogy 2021, 5(4), 91; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy5040091 - 21 Oct 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3678
Abstract
A growing body of scholarship addresses what Indigenous peoples have always known: stories are critically important to who we are and how to be in the world. For Wounaan, an Indigenous people of Panama and Colombia, ancestors’ stories are no longer frequently told. [...] Read more.
A growing body of scholarship addresses what Indigenous peoples have always known: stories are critically important to who we are and how to be in the world. For Wounaan, an Indigenous people of Panama and Colombia, ancestors’ stories are no longer frequently told. As part of the Wounaan Podpa Nʌm Pömaam (National Wounaan Congress) and Foundation for the Development of Wounaan People’s project on bird guiding, birds and culture, and forest restoration in Panama, we leveraged the publication requirement as political intervention and anticolonial practice in storying worlds. This article is the story of our storying, the telling and crafting of an illustrated story book that honors Wounaan convivial lifeworlds, Wounaan chaain döhigaau nemchaain hoo wënʌʌrrajim/Los niños wounaan, en sus aventuras vieron muchas aves/The Adventures of Wounaan Children and Many Birds. Here, we have used video conference minutes and recordings, voice and text messages, emails, recollections, and a conference co-presentation to show stories as Indigenous method and reality, as epistemological and ontological. We use a narrative form to weave together our collaborative process and polish the many storying decisions on relationality, time, egalitarianism, movement, rivers, embodiment, and verbal poetics through an everyday adventure of siblings and birds. Available as a multimodal illustrated story book in digital audio and print, we conclude by advocating for new media to further storying Indigenous lifeworlds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Storying Indigenous (Life)Worlds)
Show Figures

Figure 1

10 pages, 495 KiB  
Article
Indigenous Virginia Digital Storytelling Project: A Creation Story
by Kasey Jernigan and Beth Roach
Genealogy 2021, 5(4), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy5040088 - 18 Oct 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2689
Abstract
Indigenous ways of knowing and being are invested in creating and maintaining relationships, respectful and equitable exchange, and collective but particularistic knowledges that are practical, useful, and helpful in extending meaning-making within communities. In this paper, we describe the ways that university faculty [...] Read more.
Indigenous ways of knowing and being are invested in creating and maintaining relationships, respectful and equitable exchange, and collective but particularistic knowledges that are practical, useful, and helpful in extending meaning-making within communities. In this paper, we describe the ways that university faculty and tribal citizens come together to build meaningful relations through storytelling and counter-mapping. Focusing on what is currently known as Virginia (and the surrounding regions more broadly), the project aims to center Indigenous-created accounts of places and spaces as being infused with stories, memories, and life to reveal living histories layered into the fabric of these lands and waters. This paper details the careful, enjoyable, and challenging-at-times processes of relation-building between a university and local tribal citizens (which continues to take shape) for this project to become the Indigenous Virginia Digital Storytelling Project. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Storying Indigenous (Life)Worlds)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 303 KiB  
Article
Storying Traditions, Lessons and Lives: Responsible and Grounded Indigenous Storying Ethics and Methods
by Doreen E. Martinez
Genealogy 2021, 5(4), 84; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy5040084 - 23 Sep 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1880
Abstract
This article offers a conceptual framework on Indigenous storying ethics, storying methods, storying as ruptures and storying interventions, to distinguish elements, premises and practices distinctive to Indigenous storying. This conceptual framework is built from (in)formal relational storying experiences and more structured data from [...] Read more.
This article offers a conceptual framework on Indigenous storying ethics, storying methods, storying as ruptures and storying interventions, to distinguish elements, premises and practices distinctive to Indigenous storying. This conceptual framework is built from (in)formal relational storying experiences and more structured data from over twenty years of qualitative, ethnographic, and storying projects. In its departure from expected Western methodological approaches to collecting and reporting data, it lives in Indigenous truths and epistemologies in our responsibilities and in our grounding. The interplay between ethics, methods, ruptures and interventions illustrates and centers storying as it speaks of the epistemological power of storying from ancient and traditional nature-based immersions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Storying Indigenous (Life)Worlds)
Back to TopTop