Special Issue "Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic, Children, Families and Their Communities in and against Social Welfare Systems"

A special issue of Genealogy (ISSN 2313-5778).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2020) | Viewed by 23097

Special Issue Editors

Dr. John Wainwright
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Social Work, Care and Community, University of Central 1, Preston PR1 2HE, UK
Interests: the intersection between ethnicity, racism and social work practice; race, ethnicity and racism and youth justice; children and young people in care; adoption and mental health
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Ms. Beverley Burke
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Nursing and Allied Health, Faculty of Education, Health and Community, John Moores University, Liverpool L3 5UA, UK
Interests: race; anti-oppressive practice; social work

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue invites papers on the experiences of children, young people and families of Black, Asian and Minority (BAME) Ethnic heritage who come into contact with the criminal (youth) justice systems around the world. BAME children and young people continually struggle against a racism that oppresses, discriminates and excludes from wider socio economic, political and cultural participation in society (Harries 2014). This Special Issue will build on existing literature (for example, Kundnani, 2012; Lentin 2014) to explore what this means and how it is manifested in the experience of the criminal (youth) justice systems for BAME children, young people and their families in all their heterogeneous, diverse make up. This may be as a consequence of racism, poverty and socio- economic factors, or through entering the criminal justice system because of their experiences of being in care (foster or residential) as a child or young person, or of the mental health system (Mullen et al, 2014; Lammy, 2016; Fitzpatrick and Williams 2017). It has been suggested that to enable desistance from offending behaviour race is but one category that should be considered and a focus on intersectional identities, including gender, masculinity, poverty and social disorganization need to be understood, along with the impact of power and privilege in societies (Calverley, 2013; Glynn, 2016). Importantly, the evidence of the resilience of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic families’ genealogy over the generations can be explored in the face racism and various criminal justice’s institutional responses.

It is acknowledged that Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic is a much contested term/ explanation of individuals and communities of colour, as are corollary explanations that inadequately represent the differing experiences, shifting and fluid identities of peoples of racialized difference around the world/ globe. Indeed, in many parts of the world, there is a much more spatially and culturally specific term/identity used. However, the single unifying factor that families of BAME genealogical heritage experience is the struggle and challenge against and of racism within their local spatial, political and cultural context. It is analysis, discussion and debate of these (inter)national stories and experiences within the context of the criminal (youth) justice system that this Special Issue aims to include.

Through a multi and interdisciplinary lens there is opportunity to explore how the discourse and experience of race is enacted in criminal (youth) justice systems (inter)nationally. Children, young people and their families of BAME genealogical heritage have been on the margins of society, excluded from participation and power. This Issue encourages contributions to explore how BAME children, young people and their families as Outsiders, with inherently different heritages to majority white communities negotiate this experience of exclusion and alienation through the criminal justice systems. Thus, the overarching purpose of the Special Issue is to encourage insights and development in genealogical studies through work discussing BAME children, young people, their families and the criminal (youth) justice system and genealogical methods to understand race through this prism.

Papers are invited from any relevant disciplinary backgrounds, addressing but not limited to the topics listed below and should include BAME children, young people and their families who have experienced.

Prisons

Resettlement and reintegration into communities

Desistance from offending

Intersectionality – identity and offending

Court processes

The mental health systems

Police

Dual heritage/ multiple identities in families

Gangs

The care system

Participation and exclusion from communities

And more holistically

Girls, young Women and their families experiences of the criminal (youth) justice system.

Black young people and families narratives through their youth justice journeys

Muslim Young people their families and youth justice

All approaches are welcome, but the editors will be particularly encouraging of submissions that involve participatory approaches that empower young people in the course of inquiry and/or innovation in methodologies that place young peoples voices at the centre of findings.

Dr. John Wainwright
Ms. Beverley Burke
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Genealogy is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • BAME 
  • Black families
  • Race
  • Racism Young People
  • Youth Justice
  • Criminal Justice

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
Introducing the Special Issue on the Experiences of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) Children and Families in the Welfare Context
Genealogy 2021, 5(4), 89; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy5040089 - 18 Oct 2021
Viewed by 1681
Abstract
This Special Issue explores papers on the experiences of children, young people and families of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) heritage who come into contact with the criminal (youth) justice systems in the UK [...] Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Article
We Are the Same, but Different: A Duoethnography of People of Colour Who Are Care Leavers
Genealogy 2020, 4(3), 80; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4030080 - 31 Jul 2020
Viewed by 1768
Abstract
In this article, we use autoethnography to explore autobiographical narratives of being both people of colour and care leavers. The conversations were recorded (audio and transcription) and themes include identity, common emotional responses, perspectives, the challenges of being Asian and Black and in [...] Read more.
In this article, we use autoethnography to explore autobiographical narratives of being both people of colour and care leavers. The conversations were recorded (audio and transcription) and themes include identity, common emotional responses, perspectives, the challenges of being Asian and Black and in care, identifying as a care leaver in adulthood, race and racism. This article will explore the themes in detail while considering the differences in context of the lived experiences of the two authors, with one having been adopted by a white, British family and being of dual ethnicity, while the other being of South Asian ethnicity and having experienced foster care, including short-term foster placements. This article will explore not only experiences of childhood, but also of those faced in adulthood related to the two identifiers discussed. Although there will be some discussion on the outward, including society’s response, challenges and outcomes, in particular regarding children in care and race, there will be a focus on the inward, the emotional and intellectual understanding of these issues. Full article
Article
“They Will Keep Seeing Young Women Murdered by Men. Enough Is Enough-We Have Seen too Many Women Lose Their Lives”. Lessons for Professionals Working with Victims of ‘Honour’ Abuse and Violence
Genealogy 2020, 4(3), 69; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4030069 - 01 Jul 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3221
Abstract
The brutal ‘honour’ killing of Banaz Mahmod, aged 20, is still one of the most prominent murder cases of this kind in Britain. This was due partly to its complexity as well as the poor police response to Banaz’s pleas for help before [...] Read more.
The brutal ‘honour’ killing of Banaz Mahmod, aged 20, is still one of the most prominent murder cases of this kind in Britain. This was due partly to its complexity as well as the poor police response to Banaz’s pleas for help before her death—most notably, she reported her abuse on multiple occasions, forewarned them of her murder, and named her killers. This tragic case was a painful example of how professional agencies in the UK fail victims of so called ‘honour’ abuse and violence. Fifteen years on, support services are still naive about the people and communities most vulnerable to ‘honour’ abuse in Britain. More recently, campaigns to include Black, Asian, and other ethnic minority victims in the mainstream domestic abuse agenda have encouraged agencies to be culturally-competent in their support of ‘honour’ abuse victims, to redress previous failings. To facilitate this, this study conducted a focus group discussion with fourteen women (12 victim survivors and 2 support workers) recruited from a support organisation for ethnic minority women dealing with ‘honour’ abuse, to gain insight into their lived experiences. Interviews were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Three superordinate themes emerged, each with two sub-themes; vulnerability (sub-themes, fear of external organisations and racism); organisational and agency support (sub-themes, education and support from law enforcement), and rules and restrictions (sub-themes, immigration status and agency funding). These themes should be explored by professionals to better understand how to support female victims of ‘honour’ abuse and violence, without disparaging their culture. Full article
Article
Adolescents’ Peer Friendship and Anxiety and Depression among First-Generation Immigrant BAME Families in the UK
Genealogy 2020, 4(2), 62; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4020062 - 29 May 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2747
Abstract
There is equivocal evidence on how being a child in a Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) immigrant family affects internalizing symptoms such as anxiety. This cross-sectional study examined the relationships between peer friendships and anxiety/depression symptoms in BAME immigrant adolescents (IA) and [...] Read more.
There is equivocal evidence on how being a child in a Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) immigrant family affects internalizing symptoms such as anxiety. This cross-sectional study examined the relationships between peer friendships and anxiety/depression symptoms in BAME immigrant adolescents (IA) and white native adolescents (WNA). Method: Sixty-two adolescents from the UK (IA = 26, WNA = 36, mean age = 14 years) were assessed on close friendship, social competence, social anxiety, and depression. Immigrant family parents (n = 23) were also assessed on cultural orientation. There were no significant differences in anxiety and depression between groups. Bayes factors supported the conclusion that the groups did not differ. However, IA and WNA groups had different patterns of associations between close friendship/social competence and anxiety and depression symptoms. Close friendships were more strongly associated with lower anxiety/depression in IAs than WNAs, and social competence was more strongly associated with lower anxiety/depression in WNAs than IAs. Moderation analyses indicated that the relationship between close friendship and social and separation anxiety was significantly moderated by ethnic group, as was the relationship between social competence and generalized anxiety. The findings suggest that social and separation anxiety are more strongly associated with close friendships for BAME immigrant children than for non-immigrant adolescents. As such, activities that help BAME immigrant children to foster close relationships may have positive effects on their well-being. Full article
Article
Are Family Systems and Medical Systems Broken? An Auto-Ethnographic Reflection on Psychiatric Incarceration in India
Genealogy 2020, 4(2), 60; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4020060 - 18 May 2020
Viewed by 1329
Abstract
I examine whether undue power and privilege allow families in India to use force to incarcerate their wives, daughters or other family members who may deviate from the “norm”. Using my own personal experience, I examine the intersectionality of gender, violence and privilege [...] Read more.
I examine whether undue power and privilege allow families in India to use force to incarcerate their wives, daughters or other family members who may deviate from the “norm”. Using my own personal experience, I examine the intersectionality of gender, violence and privilege to see how several systems are broken. I also argue psychiatry and the patriarchy are tools of oppression and how India and most other societies continue to perpetuate trauma in those they are trying to help. In addition, families become “allies” to psychiatry and medical systems unwittingly and become “keepers” of their broken people. By citing other writing and memoirs, I will show how stories like these have been happening since before Victorian times to the present. Full article
Article
Youth Justice, Black Children and Young Men in Liverpool: A Story of Rac(ism), Identity and Contested Spaces
Genealogy 2020, 4(2), 57; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4020057 - 06 May 2020
Viewed by 2204
Abstract
This study explores the experiences of the black children and young men that attended a Youth Offending Team (YOT) in Liverpool, a city in the North of England, UK. It focuses on the perspectives of both the YOT practitioners and the black children/young [...] Read more.
This study explores the experiences of the black children and young men that attended a Youth Offending Team (YOT) in Liverpool, a city in the North of England, UK. It focuses on the perspectives of both the YOT practitioners and the black children/young men as they develop working relationships with each other. Through this two-way prism the back children/young men reflect on what is important to them before and after they enter the criminal justice system. Likewise, the YOT practitioners provide their understanding of the key issues in the young people’s lives—in particular, how the black children/young men made sense of their lives in Liverpool with a particular identity with place, space, class and race. A genealogy of race/class prism, along with an intersectional and appreciative inquiry methodology, was employed that encouraged the youth justice workers and young black men to explore the strengths and realities of their lives. Focus groups were undertaken with seven YOT practitioners and managers, along with semi-structured interviews with five black children/young men. The methodology focused on points of intersection of power, difference and identity. Findings that emerged from the participants included the experience of racism within the criminal justice system, the community and the wider city, along with the importance of education, employment and relations with the young people’s family. A core theme was an identity of black children/young men from a specific region. This intersection was as Scousers, black boys/young men, the contestation over space and their negotiated identity regarding race. The ambivalence and (un)certainty that these identities evoked provide possibilities for youth justice practitioners engaging with young black men involved in serious and repeat offending. Full article
Article
Black Boys’ and Young Men’s Experiences with Criminal Justice and Desistance in England and Wales: A Literature Review
Genealogy 2020, 4(2), 50; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4020050 - 15 Apr 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 6599
Abstract
Black boys and young men are over-represented in the youth and adult justice systems in England and Wales. Despite the Lammy Review (2017) into the treatment of and outcomes for Black, Asian, and minority ethnic individuals (BAME) in the criminal justice system, the [...] Read more.
Black boys and young men are over-represented in the youth and adult justice systems in England and Wales. Despite the Lammy Review (2017) into the treatment of and outcomes for Black, Asian, and minority ethnic individuals (BAME) in the criminal justice system, the disproportionate numbers of Black boys and young men at all stages of the system continue to rise. There has been limited qualitative research of Black boys’ and young men’s experiences with the justice system in England and Wales. In particular, there is a lack of evidence on their experiences with sentencing and courts. What is known tends to focus on Black, Asian, and minority ethnic and/or Muslim men’s experiences more generally. A lack of critical understanding of the specific experiences of desistance by young Black men has been criticised in the literature. Set in this context, this review of UK literature focuses on the following questions: (1) What are Black boys’ and young Black men’s experiences with the youth and criminal justice systems in England and Wales? (2) What does research tell us specifically about their experiences with desistance? Full article
Article
Plant Fetish: A Creative Challenge to Mental Health Stigma
Genealogy 2020, 4(2), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4020040 - 31 Mar 2020
Viewed by 2158
Abstract
People of BAMME (Black, Asian, Minority, and Migrant ethnic) heritage in the UK experience various anomalies when engaging with mental health services. Typically concentrated at secondary and secure levels of care, these discrepant experiences interact with a reticence to uptake mental health support [...] Read more.
People of BAMME (Black, Asian, Minority, and Migrant ethnic) heritage in the UK experience various anomalies when engaging with mental health services. Typically concentrated at secondary and secure levels of care, these discrepant experiences interact with a reticence to uptake mental health support at the primary care level. Official, national anti-stigma campaigns often reproduce messages that do not connect with BAMME communities, raising questions about how best to challenge stigma in this context. This research paper describes a case study of an alternative means to address stigma, drawing from a dramatic comedy performance, Plant Fetish, written and performed by an artist who carries a diagnosis of complex post-traumatic stress disorder (Complex PTSD). The study comprised of an individual interview with the artist, audience feedback, and a group discussion conducted after the show. Data were subject to interpretative phenomenological analysis. Findings are discussed in relation to the importance of using creativity to increase public awareness of mental health and inform efforts to reduce stigma. We conclude that such approaches show promise and merit further exploration in a context of growing discursive interest in mental health amidst acknowledged deficiencies of contemporary anti-stigma efforts, especially as they apply to BAMME people, their families, and their communities. Full article
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