Gel Materials in Advanced Energy Systems

A special issue of Gels (ISSN 2310-2861). This special issue belongs to the section "Gel Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 August 2024 | Viewed by 560

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Institute of Electrochemistry and Energy Systems, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia, Bulgaria
Interests: energy; carbons; electrolytes; supercapacitors; gels; nanomaterials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The European Green Deal, as well as other initiatives, will help achieve climate neutrality by 2050 to transform the EU and the world into a modern, resource-efficient, and competitive economy. Energy storage and conversion technologies are two important features of the current global transformation and the next "climate neutral" scenario. Therefore, highly efficient energy systems have attracted extensive research interest in recent years, with efforts focused on the development of new electrode materials and electrolytes.

Due to their unique properties, such as flexibility, stretchability, and biocompatibility, gel materials are increasingly finding applications in various types of energy conversion and storage systems, such as lithium ion batteries, supercapacitors, fuel cells, etc. The ability to easily modify the properties of gels further expands their capabilities and improves their performance. Using energy gels, extremely flexible and stretchable devices can be created by applying them to flexible substrates. Reactive polymer gels can be employed to create smart energy devices that respond to changes in the environment. It is extremely important to emphasize that by using different gel materials, the applications of energy devices can be extended to other technological fields.

In order to popularize the great potential of gel materials and their application in modern energy systems, as well as to strengthen the links in academia, the present Special Issue titled "Gel Materials in Advanced Energy Systems" has been launched. Original research articles, reviews, and perspectives relevant to the scope of this Special Issue are welcomed.

Thank you.

Prof. Dr. Antonia Stoyanova
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Gels is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2100 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • energy storage
  • energy conversion
  • gel-based materials
  • gel-based electrolytes
  • conductive polymer gel

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 1667 KiB  
Article
Nanocomposite Perfluorosulfonic Acid/Montmorillonite-Na+ Polymer Membrane as Gel Electrolyte in Hybrid Supercapacitors
by Borislava Mladenova, Galin Borisov, Mariela Dimitrova, Desislava Budurova, Maya Staneva, Filip Ublekov and Antonia Stoyanova
Gels 2024, 10(7), 452; https://doi.org/10.3390/gels10070452 - 10 Jul 2024
Viewed by 315
Abstract
Solid-state supercapacitors with gel electrolytes have emerged as a promising field for various energy storage applications, including electronic devices, electric vehicles, and mobile phones. In this study, nanocomposite gel membranes were fabricated using the solution casting method with perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomer dispersion, [...] Read more.
Solid-state supercapacitors with gel electrolytes have emerged as a promising field for various energy storage applications, including electronic devices, electric vehicles, and mobile phones. In this study, nanocomposite gel membranes were fabricated using the solution casting method with perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomer dispersion, both with and without the incorporation of 10 wt.% montmorillonite (MMT). MMT, a natural clay known for its high surface area and layered structure, is expected to enhance the properties of supercapacitor systems. Manganese oxide, selected for its pseudocapacitive behavior in a neutral electrolyte, was synthesized via direct co-precipitation. The materials underwent structural and morphological characterization. For electrochemical evaluation, a two-electrode Swagelok cell was employed, featuring a carbon xerogel negative electrode, a manganese dioxide positive electrode, and a PFSA polymer membrane serving as both the electrolyte and separator. The membrane was immersed in a 1 M Na2SO4 solution before testing. A comprehensive electrochemical analysis of the hybrid cells was conducted and compared with a symmetric carbon/carbon supercapacitor. Cyclic voltammetric curves were recorded, and galvanostatic charge–discharge tests were conducted at various temperatures (20, 40, 60 °C). The hybrid cell with the PFSA/MMT 10 wt.% exhibited the highest specific capacitance and maintained its hybrid profile after prolonged cycling at elevated temperatures, highlighting the potential of the newly developed membrane. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gel Materials in Advanced Energy Systems)
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