Special Issue "The Role of Bio-Economy for Forestry—Selected Papers from FowiTa German Forest Sciences Conference (Sessions 15–19)"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Economics, Policy, and Social Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2017).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Norbert Lamersdorf
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Soil Science of Temperate Ecosystems, Georg-August-University Göttingen, Büsgenweg 2, 37077 Göttingen, Germany
Interests: nutrient cycling; nitrate leaching; soil acidification; biomass production; short rotation coppice; agroforestry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Forestry per se can be seen as one of the most prominent examples of applied bio-economy. Tree growth is mainly based on the naturally existing sources of mineral nutrients in soils and exchange processes of water and gases in the atmosphere and soil. High efficiencies of internal cycles, such as nutrient re-cycling from litter fall, are of central importance, and external inputs, such as fertilizers or other fossil-fuel-based inputs, are comparably low in our forests. However, under strongly increasing demands for wood-based energy sources and new silvicultural strategies to combat climate change impacts by increasing the shares of broadleaf woods, the sustainability-oriented forest bio-economy has been challenged. Effects of enhanced residual forest wood exploitations, impacts of fast growing tree plantations, as well as newly developed production and consumer profiles, such as hardwoods and other wood-based products, have to be investigated and adapted for future scenarios. Thus, the bio-economy of wood production and consumption has to be carefully balanced with respect to economics, competitiveness, and sustainability.

Prof. Dr. Norbert Lamersdor
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bio-economy
  • sources
  • wood production

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessCommunication
Potentials and Unknowns in Managing Coarse Woody Debris for Soil Functioning
Forests 2017, 8(2), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/f8020037 - 04 Feb 2017
Cited by 10
Abstract
More intensive removal of woody biomass for the bio-economy will disrupt litter and succession cycles. Especially at risk is the retention of fine and coarse woody debris (FWD and CWD), crucial factors in forest biodiversity and nutrient cycling. However, to what extent CWD [...] Read more.
More intensive removal of woody biomass for the bio-economy will disrupt litter and succession cycles. Especially at risk is the retention of fine and coarse woody debris (FWD and CWD), crucial factors in forest biodiversity and nutrient cycling. However, to what extent CWD affects soil functioning remains unknown, and is seldom considered. From 32 paired test–reference points in eight Fagus sylvatica (L.) stands throughout Southwest Germany, CWD significantly increased soil C/N ratios, base saturation, and possibly pH. CWD-induced changes in soil porosity, available water capacity, and total organic carbon depended on site and CWD characteristics. As such, CWD can be viewed as a “pedogenic hot-spot” of concentrated biogeochemical and -physical processes with outsized effects on soil functioning and development. CWD management for soil functioning should consider site and tree species specific volume thresholds, timed rotations, and spatial densities, but appropriate implementation requires further research to define best management practices. If successful, overall forest resilience as well as soil functioning and productivity can be improved. Full article
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