Special Issue "Wastewater and Solid Waste Treatment"

A special issue of Environments (ISSN 2076-3298).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Mingu Kim
Website
Guest Editor
The University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
Interests: biological nutrient removal; second-generation technology for wastewater treatment; anaerobic digestion; food waste co-digestion; emerging contaminants

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fast-growing industrialization and urbanization have dramatically increased energy demand and the discharge of nutrients. With an increasing shortage of energy resources and concerns of environmental pollution, energy-efficient and sustainable pollution control is critical for the optimization of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Typically, energy balance in WWTPs is negative, as energy demand for treating pollutants is higher than energy (methane) recovery through sludge treatment using anaerobic digestion. The main current challenges of WWTPs which drive innovation in the wastewater industry include nutrients and biosolids management as well as energy optimization. Co-digestion of organic-rich wastes with municipal sludge is a promising energy recovery technology to increase specific methane production per unit of influent solids significantly.

This Special Issue invites original research papers and critical reviews with an emphasis on the following topics: (i) advances in biological nutrient removal technology; (ii) modeling and optimization of BNR processes; (iii) co-digestion technology; and (iv) development of technology for energy-neutrality in WWTPs.

Dr. Mingu Kim
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Environments is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biological nutrient removal
  • modeling
  • anaerobic digestion
  • co-digestion
  • energy-neutrality

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Biogas Production from Food Residues—The Role of Trace Metals and Co-Digestion with Primary Sludge
Environments 2020, 7(6), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments7060042 - 29 May 2020
Abstract
The majority of municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants (WWTPs) in Sweden produce biogas from sewage sludge. In order to increase the methane production, co-digestion of internal sludge with Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Waste (OFMSW) might be feasible in the future. The objective of [...] Read more.
The majority of municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants (WWTPs) in Sweden produce biogas from sewage sludge. In order to increase the methane production, co-digestion of internal sludge with Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Waste (OFMSW) might be feasible in the future. The objective of this study was therefore to find a beneficial solution for the utilization of OFMSW at the WWTP in Varberg, Sweden. The effects of co-digesting primary sludge (PS) and OFMSW collected in the municipality, in different mixing ratios, were investigated by semi-continuous anaerobic digestion assays. Furthermore, the effects of the addition of a commercial trace elements mixture solution (CTES), available on the market in Sweden, were also examined. Co-digestion of OFMSW and PS resulted in specific methane yields of 404, 392, and 375 NmL CH4/g volatile solids (VS), obtained during semi-continuous operations of 301, 357 and 385 days, for the reactors fed with OMFSW:PS ratio of 4:1, 3:1, and 1:1, and at maximum organic loading rates (OLRs) achieved of 4.0, 4.0 and 5.0 gVS/L/d, respectively. Furthermore, mono-digestion of OFMSW failed already at OLR of 1.0 gVS/L/d, however, an OLR of 4.0 gVS/L/d could be achieved with addition of 14 µL/g VS Commercial Trace Element Solutions (CTES) leading to 363 mL CH4/g VS methane production. These experiments were running during 411 days. Hence, higher process efficiency was obtained when using co-digestion of OFMSW and PS compared to that of OFMSW in mono-digestion. Co-digestion is a more feasible option where a balanced Carbon/Nitrogen (C/N) ratio and nutrient supply can be maintained. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wastewater and Solid Waste Treatment)
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Open AccessArticle
In Situ Acoustic Treatment of Anaerobic Digesters to Improve Biogas Yields
Environments 2020, 7(2), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments7020011 - 08 Feb 2020
Abstract
Sound has the potential to increase biogas yields and enhance wastewater degradation in anaerobic digesters. To assess this potential, two pilot-scale digestion systems were operated, with one exposed to sound at less than 10 kHz and with one acting as a control. Sounds [...] Read more.
Sound has the potential to increase biogas yields and enhance wastewater degradation in anaerobic digesters. To assess this potential, two pilot-scale digestion systems were operated, with one exposed to sound at less than 10 kHz and with one acting as a control. Sounds used were sine waves, broadband noise, and orchestral compositions. Weekly biogas production from sound-treated digesters was 18,900 L, more than twice that of the control digester. The sound-treated digesters were primarily exposed to orchestral compositions, because this made cavitational events easier to identify and because harmonic and amplitude shifts in music seem to induce more cavitation. Background recordings from the sound-treated digester were louder and had more cavitational events than those of the control digester, which we ascribe to enhanced microbial growth and the resulting accelerated sludge breakdown. Acoustic cavitation, vibrational energy imparted to wastewater and sludge, and mixing due to a release of bubbles from the sludge may all act in concert to accelerate wastewater degradation and boost biogas production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wastewater and Solid Waste Treatment)
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