Special Issue "Ecotoxicology of Freshwater Environments"

A special issue of Environments (ISSN 2076-3298).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2016).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Roberta Bettinetti

Guest Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The importance of the different components of freshwater ecosystems for the transfer of contaminants, from water and sediments through the food web (from primary producers to the top predators via secondary producers), still presents a number of open questions. Complete evaluations of the overall exposure to organic and inorganic micropollutants in aquatic ecosystems of biota, such as phytoplankton, zooplankton (grazers and predators), and different species of fish (zooplanktivorous and predators), are still limited, and in this regard more inputs are needed.
Both experimental and model assessment, providing a consistent and integrated picture of the dynamic coupling of the different components of freshwater ecosystems, are therefore welcome in order to understand the overall functioning of complex ecosystem, such as lakes. Therefore, a traditional chemical analyses integrated with effect-based tools in monitoring efforts are considered a useful approach in the evaluation of the influence of contamination on freshwater ecosystems.

Dr. Roberta Bettinetti
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • freshwater ecosystem
  • organic micropollutants
  • inorganic pollutants
  • trophic transfer of contaminants
  • zooplankton
  • fish
  • effect-based tools
  • ecotoxicity tests

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Mercury Accumulation, and the Mercury-PCB-Sex Interaction, in Lake Whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis)
Environments 2016, 3(1), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments3010007 - 09 Mar 2016
Cited by 5
Abstract
We determined whole-fish Hg concentrations of 26 female and 34 male adult lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) from northern Lake Huron captured during November 2010. Subsampling from these 60 fish, Hg concentration was also determined in both somatic tissue and ovaries ( [...] Read more.
We determined whole-fish Hg concentrations of 26 female and 34 male adult lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) from northern Lake Huron captured during November 2010. Subsampling from these 60 fish, Hg concentration was also determined in both somatic tissue and ovaries (n = 5), while methylmercury (MeHg) concentration was determined in whole fish (n = 18). Bioenergetics modeling was used to assess the growth dilution effect on the difference in Hg concentrations between the sexes. Mean whole-fish Hg concentration in females (59.9 ng/g) was not significantly different from mean whole-fish Hg concentration in males (54.4 ng/g). MeHg accounted for 91% of the mercury found in the lake whitefish. Bioenergetics modeling results indicated that the growth dilution effect did not contribute to the difference in Hg concentrations between the sexes. We estimated that females increased in Hg concentration by 17.9%, on average, immediately after spawning due to release of eggs. Using polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) data for the same 60 lake whitefish from a previous study, we detected a significant interaction between sex and contaminant type (Hg or PCBs), which was attributable to males being significantly higher in PCB concentration than females. Males may be eliminating Hg at a faster rate than females. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecotoxicology of Freshwater Environments)
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Open AccessArticle
Mercury Concentrations of Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) Vary by Sex
Environments 2015, 2(4), 546-564; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments2040546 - 11 Nov 2015
Cited by 2
Abstract
Patterns in relative differences in contaminant concentrations between the sexes across many species of fish may reveal clues for important behavioral and physiological differences between the sexes, and may also be useful in developing fish consumption advisories and efficient designs for programs meant [...] Read more.
Patterns in relative differences in contaminant concentrations between the sexes across many species of fish may reveal clues for important behavioral and physiological differences between the sexes, and may also be useful in developing fish consumption advisories and efficient designs for programs meant to monitor contaminant levels in fish. We determined skin-off fillet and whole-fish total mercury (Hg) concentrations of 28 adult female and 26 adult male bluegills (Lepomis macrochirus) from Squaw Lake, Oakland County, Michigan (MI), USA. Bioenergetics modeling was used to quantify the effect of growth dilution on the difference in Hg concentrations between the sexes. On average, skin-off fillet and whole-fish Hg concentrations were 25.4% higher and 26.6% higher, respectively, in females compared with males. Thus, the relative difference in Hg concentrations between the sexes for skin-off fillets was nearly identical to that for whole fish. However, mean skin-off fillet Hg concentration (363 ng/g) was 2.3 times greater than mean whole-fish Hg concentration (155 ng/g). Males grew substantially faster than females, and bioenergetics modeling results indicated that the growth dilution effect could account for females having 14.4% higher Hg concentrations than males. Our findings should be useful in revising fish consumption advisories. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecotoxicology of Freshwater Environments)
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