Special Issue "Entropy in Renewable Energy Systems"

A special issue of Entropy (ISSN 1099-4300). This special issue belongs to the section "Thermodynamics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. T M Indra Mahlia
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Information, Systems and Modelling, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney NSW 2007, Australia
Interests: energy systems; thermodynamics; biobased polymer; renewable energy; energy policy; techno-economic analysis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Oki Muraza
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering and Center of Excellence in Nano Technology (CENT), King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM), Post Office Box 5040, Dhahran 31261, Saudi Arabia
Interests: process intensifications; structured catalysts; structured reactors; zeolite; thermodynamics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The utilization of fossil fuels is responsible for the accumulation of CO2 emission in the atmosphere. In addition, the production of fossil fuel displays a declining trend. The worldwide community has committed to exploring and developing technology related to renewable energy sources in order to address these challenges. Apart from experimental investigations, entrophy and exergy analysis is also a suitable approach to evaluate the overall performance so long as the proper determination of the model delivers an accurate prediction of the process performance. Furthermore, the thermodynamic approach is economically attractive and time-effective. The development of renewable energy conversion technology shows promise regarding the ability to meet energy demands and maintain the environment. This Special Issue aims to facilitate advanced research related to the conversion process of renewable sources to produce energy, in terms of original research articles as well as review articles.

Prof. T M Indra Mahlia
Dr. Oki Muraza
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Entropy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Entropy in renewable energy systems
  • Econometric model of entropy
  • Entropy for renewable energy forecasting
  • Cross-entropy method for renewable energy
  • Renewable energy in terms of entropy
  • Entropy and exergy of renewable energy.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Finite-Time Thermodynamic Model for Evaluating Heat Engines in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion
Entropy 2020, 22(2), 211; https://doi.org/10.3390/e22020211 - 13 Feb 2020
Abstract
Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) converts the thermal energy stored in the ocean temperature difference between warm surface seawater and cold deep seawater into electricity. The necessary temperature difference to drive OTEC heat engines is only 15–25 K, which will theoretically be of [...] Read more.
Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) converts the thermal energy stored in the ocean temperature difference between warm surface seawater and cold deep seawater into electricity. The necessary temperature difference to drive OTEC heat engines is only 15–25 K, which will theoretically be of low thermal efficiency. Research has been conducted to propose unique systems that can increase the thermal efficiency. This thermal efficiency is generally applied for the system performance metric, and researchers have focused on using the higher available temperature difference of heat engines to improve this efficiency without considering the finite flow rate and sensible heat of seawater. In this study, our model shows a new concept of thermodynamics for OTEC. The first step is to define the transferable thermal energy in the OTEC as the equilibrium state and the dead state instead of the atmospheric condition. Second, the model shows the available maximum work, the new concept of exergy, by minimizing the entropy generation while considering external heat loss. The maximum thermal energy and exergy allow the normalization of the first and second laws of thermal efficiencies. These evaluation methods can be applied to optimized OTEC systems and their effectiveness is confirmed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Entropy in Renewable Energy Systems)
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Open AccessArticle
Hybrid Membrane Distillation and Wet Scrubber for Simultaneous Recovery of Heat and Water from Flue Gas
Entropy 2020, 22(2), 178; https://doi.org/10.3390/e22020178 - 04 Feb 2020
Abstract
Flue gas contains high amount of low-grade heat and water vapor that are attractive for recovery. This study assesses performance of a hybrid of water scrubber and membrane distillation (MD) to recover both heat and water from a simulated flue gas. The former [...] Read more.
Flue gas contains high amount of low-grade heat and water vapor that are attractive for recovery. This study assesses performance of a hybrid of water scrubber and membrane distillation (MD) to recover both heat and water from a simulated flue gas. The former help to condense the water vapor to form a hot liquid flow which later used as the feed for the MD unit. The system simultaneously recovers water and heat through the MD permeate. Results show that the system performance is dictated by the MD performance since most heat and water can be recovered by the scrubber unit. The scrubber achieved nearly complete water and heat recovery because the flue gas flows were supersaturated with steam condensed in the water scrubber unit. The recovered water and heat in the scrubber contains in the hot liquid used as the feed for the MD unit. The MD performance is affected by both the temperature and the flow rate of the flue gas. The MD fluxes increases at higher flue gas temperatures and higher flow rates because of higher enthalpy of the flue gas inputs. The maximum obtained water and heat fluxes of 12 kg m2 h1 and 2505 kJm2 h1 respectively, obtained at flue gas temperature of 99 °C and at flow rate of 5.56 L min−1. The MD flux was also found stable over the testing period at this optimum condition. Further study on assessing a more realistic flue gas composition is required to capture complexity of the process, particularly to address the impacts of particulates and acid gases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Entropy in Renewable Energy Systems)
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