Special Issue "New Achievements on Chaos, Turbulence and Complexity in Heliospheric Space Plasma Dynamics"

A special issue of Entropy (ISSN 1099-4300). This special issue belongs to the section "Complexity".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 October 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Giuseppe Consolini
Website
Guest Editor
National Institute for Astrophysics, Institute for Space Astrophysics and Planetology (INAF-IAPS), Rome, Italy
Interests: complexity in space plasmas; dynamical systems and information theory approaches to Sun-Earth relationships and Earth’s magnetospheric dynamics
Dr. Tommaso Alberti
Website
Guest Editor
INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome, Italy
Interests: nonlinear dynamics and chaos; time series analysis; turbulence and complexity; solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere dynamics; climate variability
Dr. Paola De Michelis
Website
Guest Editor
Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Rome, Italy
Interests: solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere dynamics, turbulence and complexity in circumterrestrial environments

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the past three decades it has been realized that improving the understanding of the dynamics of space plasmas requires to explore novel approaches borrowed from dynamical systems’ approaches. Numerous studies have clearly shown how dynamical complexity, chaos, turbulence are all physical processes which play a central role in the heliospheric space plasma dynamics. On the other hand, in the framework of dynamical systems several new tools and methods have been proposed to quantify and characterize the dynamical complexity and its role in the nonlinear out-of-equilibrium dynamical systems.

This Special Issue will focus on the new achievements in the role that dynamical complexity, turbulence and chaos perform on the energy, mass and momentum transfer in the framework of heliospheric space plasmas and Sun-Earth relations using nontraditional methods based on information theory and entropic measures.

In particular, papers presenting the potentiality of entropy and information theoretic concepts in unveiling and exploring the complex dynamics of these space plasma medium at different spatial and temporal scales are welcome.

Dr. Giuseppe Consolini
Dr. Tommaso Alberti
Dr. Paola De Michelis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Entropy is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Heliospheric plasmas
  • Information Theory
  • Entropy measures
  • Complexity

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Dynamical Complexity of the 2015 St. Patrick’s Day Magnetic Storm at Swarm Altitudes Using Entropy Measures
Entropy 2020, 22(5), 574; https://doi.org/10.3390/e22050574 - 19 May 2020
Abstract
The continuously expanding toolbox of nonlinear time series analysis techniques has recently highlighted the importance of dynamical complexity to understand the behavior of the complex solar wind–magnetosphere–ionosphere–thermosphere coupling system and its components. Here, we apply new such approaches, mainly a series of entropy [...] Read more.
The continuously expanding toolbox of nonlinear time series analysis techniques has recently highlighted the importance of dynamical complexity to understand the behavior of the complex solar wind–magnetosphere–ionosphere–thermosphere coupling system and its components. Here, we apply new such approaches, mainly a series of entropy methods to the time series of the Earth’s magnetic field measured by the Swarm constellation. We show successful applications of methods, originated from information theory, to quantitatively study complexity in the dynamical response of the topside ionosphere, at Swarm altitudes, focusing on the most intense magnetic storm of solar cycle 24, that is, the St. Patrick’s Day storm, which occurred in March 2015. These entropy measures are utilized for the first time to analyze data from a low-Earth orbit (LEO) satellite mission flying in the topside ionosphere. These approaches may hold great potential for improved space weather nowcasts and forecasts. Full article
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