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Advancement in Combustion Sciences and Technology

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2011) | Viewed by 28013

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Combustion Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2 Eindhoven, The Netherlands
Interests: combustion science; technology and innovation; energy systems; conversion and carriers

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Guest Editor
Combustion Technology, Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, WH 3.141, 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands
Interests: combustion; CFD; hydrogen; ammonia; DNS; UQ; LES; SGS approximations; kinetic reduction methods; gas-turbines; energy transition; PIV measurements; heat flux burning velocity measurements

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fundamental combustion research is a relatively young science. With the introduction of lasers and digital computers, effectively some 40 years ago, big steps could be made in understanding the physical and chemical details of combustion. At the moment the basics of combustion is quite well understood for traditional combustion problems. However, with the depletion of fossil fuels and the consequences of emissions and the anthropological green house effect, new challenges need to be tackled. Solid, liquid and gaseous fuels will be used due to their unrivaled energy density. Thus clean combustion concepts are required now and in the future. Advanced combustion technology will be needed to solve the problem of clean and efficient energy conversion to obtain electric and propulsive power.

To that end new combustion concepts are investigated all over the world. Think of fuel oxygen combustion, very lean premixed combustion, premixed charged compression ignition and chemical looping combustion systems, to name a few. Besides new clean combustion concepts also fuel flexibility plays an important role. In particular the use of hydrogen originating from any sustainable energy source like sunlight or biomass is a high potential energy carrier. This also holds for Fischer-Tropsch fuels originating from sustainable sources. Currently Carbon-Capture and Sequestration is regarded as a very promising (but temporal) technique if it is combined with the conversion of coal and biomass.

These challenges go along with the fact that nowadays high fidelity scientific methods are feasible to solve much of the peculiarities associated with the new fuels and combustion strategies. Laser-techniques and supercomputer calculations become more and more mature to unravel the problems that are mentioned. This issue of Energies will be dedicated to highly accurate analysis with the aid of advanced tools for understanding of advanced new (clean) combustion systems and/or combustion of alternative fuels. The goal of the current special issue will be to present a state-of-the-art in combustion science and technology for the future; the focus is on high fidelity assessment of promising solutions.

Rob J.M. Bastiaans
Philip de Goey
Guest Editors

Keywords

  • advanced combustion
  • clean
  • efficient
  • fuel flexibility
  • DNS
  • laser-measurements

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

609 KiB  
Article
A Phenomenological Model for Prediction Auto-Ignition and Soot Formation of Turbulent Diffusion Combustion in a High Pressure Common Rail Diesel Engine
by Yongfeng Liu, Jianwei Yang, Jianmin Sun, Aihua Zhu and Qinghui Zhou
Energies 2011, 4(6), 894-912; https://doi.org/10.3390/en4060894 - 3 Jun 2011
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 8328
Abstract
A new phenomenological model, the TP (Temperature Phase) model, is presented to carry out optimization calculations for turbulent diffusion combustion in a high-pressure common rail diesel engine. Temperature is the most important parameter in the TP model, which includes two parts: an auto-ignition [...] Read more.
A new phenomenological model, the TP (Temperature Phase) model, is presented to carry out optimization calculations for turbulent diffusion combustion in a high-pressure common rail diesel engine. Temperature is the most important parameter in the TP model, which includes two parts: an auto-ignition and a soot model. In the auto-ignition phase, different reaction mechanisms are built for different zones. For the soot model, different methods are used for different temperatures. The TP model is then implemented in KIVA code instead of original model to carry out optimization. The results of cylinder pressures, the corresponding heat release rates, and soot with variation of injection time, variation of rail pressure and variation of speed among TP model, KIVA standard model and experimental data are analyzed. The results indicate that the TP model can carry out optimization and CFD (computational fluid dynamics) and can be a useful tool to study turbulent diffusion combustion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advancement in Combustion Sciences and Technology)
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1046 KiB  
Article
Impact of Turbulence Intensity and Equivalence Ratio on the Burning Rate of Premixed Methane–Air Flames
by Gordon Fru, Dominique Thévenin and Gábor Janiga
Energies 2011, 4(6), 878-893; https://doi.org/10.3390/en4060878 - 27 May 2011
Cited by 29 | Viewed by 7498
Abstract
Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) have been conducted to study the response of initially laminar spherical premixed methane–air flame kernels to successively higher turbulence intensities at five different equivalence ratios. The numerical experiments include a 16-species/25-step skeletal mechanism for methane oxidation and a multicomponent [...] Read more.
Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) have been conducted to study the response of initially laminar spherical premixed methane–air flame kernels to successively higher turbulence intensities at five different equivalence ratios. The numerical experiments include a 16-species/25-step skeletal mechanism for methane oxidation and a multicomponent molecular transport model. Highly turbulent conditions (with integral Reynolds numbers up to 4513) have been accessed. The effect of turbulence on the physical properties of the flame, in particular its consumption speed Sc, which is an interesting measure of the turbulent flame speed ST has been investigated. Local quenching events are increasingly observed for highly turbulent conditions, particularly for lean mixtures. The obtained results qualitatively confirm the expected trend regarding correlations between u′/SL and the consumption speed: Sc first increases, roughly linearly, with u′/SL (low turbulence zone), then levels off (bending zone) before decreasing again (quenching limit) for too intense turbulence. For a fixed value of u′/SL, Sc/SL varies with the mixture equivalence ratio, showing that additional parameters should probably enter phenomenological expressions relating these two quantities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advancement in Combustion Sciences and Technology)
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402 KiB  
Article
CFD Investigation into Diesel PCCI Combustion with Optimized Fuel Injection
by Zhijun Peng, Bin Liu, Weiji Wang and Lipeng Lu
Energies 2011, 4(3), 517-531; https://doi.org/10.3390/en4030517 - 18 Mar 2011
Cited by 31 | Viewed by 11527
Abstract
A multi-pulse injection strategy for premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) combustion was investigated in a four-valve, direct-injection diesel engine by a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation using KIVA-3V code coupled with detailed chemistry. The effects of fuel splitting proportion, injection timing, spray angles, [...] Read more.
A multi-pulse injection strategy for premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) combustion was investigated in a four-valve, direct-injection diesel engine by a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation using KIVA-3V code coupled with detailed chemistry. The effects of fuel splitting proportion, injection timing, spray angles, and injection velocity were examined. The mixing process and formation of soot and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions were investigated as the focus of the research. The results show that the fuel splitting proportion and the injection timing impacted the combustion and emissions significantly due to the considerable changes of the mixing process and fuel distribution in the cylinder. While the spray, inclusion angle and injection velocity at the injector exit, can be adjusted to improve mixing, combustion and emissions, appropriate injection timing and fuel splitting proportion must be jointly considered for optimum combustion performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advancement in Combustion Sciences and Technology)
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