Special Issue "Transition to a Low-Carbon Economy and Climate Change Mitigation"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "C3: Energy and Climate Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 January 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Luis Maria Abadie
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
BC3-Basque Centre for Climate Change, Sede Building 1, 1st floor Scientific Campus of the University of the Basque Country, 48940 Leioa, Spain
Interests: energy economics; carbon markets; GHG emissions; financial economics
Dr. Ibon Galarraga
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
BC3-Basque Centre for Climate Change, Sede Building 1, 1st floor Scientific Campus of the University of the Basque Country, 48940 Leioa, Spain
Interests: public policies; policy instruments; environmental and resource economics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Concerns about climate change and the Paris Agreement are leading many countries to set goals close to net-zero emissions in energy systems by 2050. To achieve this objective, many areas are of great interest such as i) the development of renewable technologies, with great technical improvements over time that generate economic advantages; ii) efficiency improvements in both residential and industrial sectors; or iii) alternative modes and energy sources for transportation. This process is accompanied in many countries by carbon pricing mechanisms (carbon tax or carbon markets), as in the case of the European Trading Scheme (ETS). All this drives the decarbonization of energy systems. While in some sectors this decarbonization can be a manageable goal, in other sectors, such as some transportation and industrial sectors that intensively use carbon, this is a difficult goal. 

This Special Issue focuses on the developments of technologies and economic instruments and policies to mitigate climate change.

Dr. Luis Maria Abadie
Dr. Ibon Galarraga
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Electrical systems decarbonization
  • Carbon markets
  • Carbon tax
  • Renewable technological development
  • GHG emissions
  • Energy efficiency

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
How Much Should We Spend to Fight against Climate Change? The Value of Backstop Technologies in a Simplified Model
Energies 2021, 14(22), 7781; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14227781 - 19 Nov 2021
Viewed by 293
Abstract
The estimation of the social cost of climate change is typically carried out with complex, difficult to interpret, integrated assessment models (IAMs). Instead, this paper presents a simple, tractable model with which to estimate the willingness to pay of societies against climate change. [...] Read more.
The estimation of the social cost of climate change is typically carried out with complex, difficult to interpret, integrated assessment models (IAMs). Instead, this paper presents a simple, tractable model with which to estimate the willingness to pay of societies against climate change. The model is based on an already comprehensive and intuitive one developed by Besley and Dixit, which has been modified by including a backstop technology (e.g., a renewable energy technology). This improved formulation allows for a more realistic representation of the climate change problem in that it is able to include the decoupling of economic growth and GHG emissions. The model allows us to understand the implications of different assumptions, such as the rate of growth of the economy, or the damages expected from climate change, on the willingness to pay against it. Our results show that, for a baseline scenario, the willingness to pay (WTP) is 0.52% of annual GDP, lower than that obtained by Besley and Dixit, which shows the significant benefits of developing competitive mitigation technologies. Our results also show the benefits of international collaboration, or of devoting more resources to R&D, as efficient ways to fight against climate change. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transition to a Low-Carbon Economy and Climate Change Mitigation)
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Article
Applying a Model of Technology Diffusion to Quantify the Potential Benefit of Improved Energy Efficiency in Data Centres
Energies 2021, 14(22), 7699; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14227699 - 17 Nov 2021
Viewed by 240
Abstract
Data centres are a key infrastructure for the global digital economy, helping enable the EU “Digital Decade” by 2030. In 2015, data centres were estimated to consume 2.5% of EU electricity demand. In Ireland, the concentrated presence of data centres could consume 37% [...] Read more.
Data centres are a key infrastructure for the global digital economy, helping enable the EU “Digital Decade” by 2030. In 2015, data centres were estimated to consume 2.5% of EU electricity demand. In Ireland, the concentrated presence of data centres could consume 37% of national electricity demand by 2028. The uncertainty of data centre facility-level energy efficiency paired with the need to achieve a low-carbon economy pose significant challenge for generation and transmission network planning. This is the first paper to apply a model of technology diffusion with a national forecast of changes in Irish data centre electricity demand through more efficient liquid cooling. The methodology serves as a technology-agnostic resource for practitioners performing forecasts under uncertainty with limited information. Results suggest that technology adoption could lower national electricity demand by 0.81% if adopted by new plant from 2019 to 2028. Savings rise to 3.16% over the same period if adopted by new and existing data centres. Adoption would also lower related emissions by 4.70% and 23.04% over the same period across both scenarios, respectively. Results highlight substantial potential electricity and associated emissions savings available in the sector and suggest policy options to support a transition towards a low-carbon economy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transition to a Low-Carbon Economy and Climate Change Mitigation)
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Article
Optimal Slow Steaming Speed for Container Ships under the EU Emission Trading System
Energies 2021, 14(22), 7487; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14227487 - 09 Nov 2021
Viewed by 278
Abstract
Slow steaming is an operational measure in ocean-going vessels sailing at slow speeds. It can help climate mitigation efforts by cutting down marine fuel consumption and consequently reducing CO2 and other Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GHG). Due to climate change both the European [...] Read more.
Slow steaming is an operational measure in ocean-going vessels sailing at slow speeds. It can help climate mitigation efforts by cutting down marine fuel consumption and consequently reducing CO2 and other Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GHG). Due to climate change both the European Union (EU) and the International Maritime Organization (IMO) are analysing the inclusion of international shipping in the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS) in the near future or alternatively implementing a carbon tax. The paper proposes a methodology to decide the optimal speed of a vessel taking into account its characteristics and the factors that determine its economic results. The calculated cash flow can be used in valuation models. The methodology is applied for a case study for any container ship in a range from 2000 to 20,000 Twenty-foot Equivalent Units (TEU) on a leg of a round trip from Shanghai to Rotterdam. We calculate how speed reduction, CO2 emissions and ship owner’s earnings per year may vary between a business-as-usual scenario and a scenario in which shipping is included in the ETS. The analysis reveals that the optimal speed varies with the size of the vessel and depends on several variables such as marine fuel prices, cargo freight rates and other voyage costs. Results show that the highest optimal speed is in the range of 5500–13,000 TEUs whether or not the ETS is applied. As the number of TEUs transported in a vessel increases emissions per TEU decrease. In an established freight rate market, the optimal speed fluctuates by 1.8 knots. Finally, the medium- and long-term expectations for slow steaming are analysed based on future market prices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transition to a Low-Carbon Economy and Climate Change Mitigation)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Optimal slow steaming speed for container ships under the EU Emission Trading System

Authors: Nestor Goicoechea1,Luis María Abadie2,*,Ibon Galarraga3

Affiliations:

1 University of the Basque Country (UPV-EHU); [email protected]
2 Basque Centre for Climate Change (BC3); [email protected]
3 Basque Centre for Climate Change (BC3); [email protected]

 

Title: Analysis of optimal global policies against climate change

Authors: C.J. Pretel1; Pedro Linares2,*

Affiliations: 

1 Universidad Pontificia de Comillas; [email protected]
2 Universidad Pontificia de Comillas; [email protected]

 

Title: Title: Economy-wide rebound effects from improved energy efficiency: How much of a concern?

Authors: Pablo Arocena; Antonio Gómez

 

Title: Rebound effect in Spain: an application of a GEM

Author: Eleanor Deny

 

Title: Numerical study of swirling hydrogen jet flames for the design of low NOx burners

Author: Jesus M. Blanco

Affiliation: University of the Basque Country

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