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Special Issue "Recent Development in Hydrogen Energy: Production, Storage, and Techno-Economic Analysis"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "A5: Hydrogen Energy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (12 June 2022) | Viewed by 2993

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Shahabuddin Ahmmad
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Science and Math Program, Asian University for Women, Chattogram 4000, Bangladesh
Interests: hydrogen energy; pyrolysis and gasification of coal and biomass; waste to energy and resource recovery; solar energy; biofuel for IC engines; CFD and process modelling; corrosion and tribology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Fares Abedalwally Ogleh AlMomani
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar
Interests: membrane technologies; water–energy nexus; water and wastewater treatment; solar applications in energy harvesting and water/wastewater treatment, application of nanomaterials and nanocatalysis in water and energy production; green nanocatalysis; process optimization and intensification; algae applications in CO2 capturing; wastewater treatment and biofuel production
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Imtenan Sayeed
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Energy, Fuel and Reaction Engineering Research Group, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Interests: chemical looping combustion; waste to hydrogen energy; pyrolysis and gasification of carbonaceous fuels; internal combustion engine; process modelling and techno-economic analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Hydrogen is undoubtedly one of the most promising future energy sources which is versatile in nature and can introduce deep decarbonisation among the industry and energy sectors. With a high energy density (120-142 MJ/kg), it produces energy with zero climate-warming emissions. In an era when energy industries are contributing around 33.2 Gt-CO emissions per year, it is hydrogen energy which can play a major role to mitigate the emissions and provide a positive shift towards decarbonisation.

Hydrogen can be produced in different pathways, including gasification of carbonaceous fuels, steam methane reforming (SMR), electrolysis, liquid fuel reforming etc. However, 76% of the 70 MMT of the current global generation of hydrogen comes from SMR of natural gas, whereas 22% comes through coal gasification and only 2% via electrolysis. According to USDOE, hydrogen generation through SMR of natural gas or gasification of coal/biomass/waste plastic etc. cost around $1.43/kg to $2.27/kg, including carbon capture and storage. In comparison, generation through electrolysis at a centralised station is estimated to be $5/kg, which multiplies three to four times if zero-carbon electricity is used. Given the maturity and substantial economic advantage of methane reforming or gasification, it is evident that they will be the cheapest route of industry-scale hydrogen production for the foreseeable future. Since carbon emission from hydrogen production depends on the primary energy source and the process exploited, it is needless to say that a continuous scientific effort is required in order to achieve carbon neutral and low-cost production of hydrogen. In addition to hydrogen production, cost-effective and safe storage/transportation of hydrogen have always been among the primary challenges to integrating hydrogen energy into the overall energy system. Low volumetric energy density and ability to permeate metal-based materials pose operational and safety constraints for hydrogen storage and transportation. It is evident that in the near future, large-scale hydrogen value chains will require a variety of storage options, which also calls for further research and development in this particular area.

Following increasing efforts to keep global warming to a minimum of 20C, it is anticipated that the global demand for hydrogen will increase to 78 exajoules by 2050. According to IEA, clean hydrogen is experiencing unprecedented political and business momentum right now since it has been understood that hydrogen is the way of tackling environmental concerns without affecting energy security. Hence, we invite researchers around the globe to contribute to this special issue and share their ideas, innovation, knowledge and experience towards the progress of hydrogen generation and utilisation. Both technical and review/analytical articles are welcome.

Dr. Shahabuddin Ahmmad
Prof. Dr. Fares Abedalwally Ogleh AlMomani
Dr. Imtenan Sayeed
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Hydrogen generation
  • Transportation
  • Storage
  • Coal and Biomass gasification
  • Steam methane reforming
  • Electrolysis
  • Carbon capture and storage
  • Life cycle assessment
  • Fuel cell
  • Techno-economic analysis

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Analysis of Technologies for Hydrogen Consumption, Transition and Storage at Operating Thermal Power Plants
Energies 2022, 15(10), 3671; https://doi.org/10.3390/en15103671 - 17 May 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 467
Abstract
The paper analyses operating and developing technologies for hydrogen implementation, transition, and storage at operating thermal power plants (TPPs) to make recommendations for realization of perspective projects for evaluation of the use of hydrogen as a fuel. Over the medium-term horizon of the [...] Read more.
The paper analyses operating and developing technologies for hydrogen implementation, transition, and storage at operating thermal power plants (TPPs) to make recommendations for realization of perspective projects for evaluation of the use of hydrogen as a fuel. Over the medium-term horizon of the next decade, it is suggested that using the technology of burning a mixture of hydrogen and natural gas in gas turbines and gas-and-oil-fired boilers in volume fractions of 20% and 80%, respectively, be implemented at operating gas fired TPPs. We consider the construction of the liquefied hydrogen and natural gas storage warehouses for the required calculated quantities of the gas mixture as a reserve energy fuel for operating the TPPs. We consider the possibility of the reserve liquid fuel system being replaced by the technology involving storage of liquefied hydrogen in combination with natural gas. An economic assessment of the storing cost of reserve fuel on the TPP site is given. The paper suggests that the methane-hydrogen mixture be supplied to the TPP site by two independent gas pipelines for the possibility of using the mixture as the main fuel and to exclude fuel storage at the plant. Full article
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Article
Co-Gasification Characteristics of Coal and Biomass Using CO2 Reactant under Thermodynamic Equilibrium Modelling
Energies 2021, 14(21), 7384; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14217384 - 05 Nov 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 626
Abstract
This study assessed the entrained flow co-gasification characteristics of coal and biomass using thermodynamic equilibrium modelling. The model was validated against entrained flow gasifier data published in the literature. The gasification performance was evaluated under different operating conditions, such as equivalence ratio, temperature, [...] Read more.
This study assessed the entrained flow co-gasification characteristics of coal and biomass using thermodynamic equilibrium modelling. The model was validated against entrained flow gasifier data published in the literature. The gasification performance was evaluated under different operating conditions, such as equivalence ratio, temperature, pressure and coal to biomass ratio. It is observed that the lower heating value (LHV) and cold gas efficiency (CGE) increase with increasing temperature until the process reaches a steady state. The effect of pressure on syngas composition is dominant only at non-steady state conditions (<1100 °C). The variation in syngas composition is minor up to the blending of 50% biomass (PB50). However, the PB50 shows a higher LHV and CGE than pure coal by 12%and 18%, respectively. Overall, biomass blending of up to 50% favours gasification performance with an LHV of 12 MJ/kg and a CGE of 78%. Full article
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Review

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Review
Artificial Neural Networks for Predicting Hydrogen Production in Catalytic Dry Reforming: A Systematic Review
Energies 2021, 14(10), 2894; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14102894 - 17 May 2021
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 1235
Abstract
Dry reforming of hydrocarbons, alcohols, and biological compounds is one of the most promising and effective avenues to increase hydrogen (H2) production. Catalytic dry reforming is used to facilitate the reforming process. The most popular catalysts for dry reforming are Ni-based [...] Read more.
Dry reforming of hydrocarbons, alcohols, and biological compounds is one of the most promising and effective avenues to increase hydrogen (H2) production. Catalytic dry reforming is used to facilitate the reforming process. The most popular catalysts for dry reforming are Ni-based catalysts. Due to their inactivation at high temperatures, these catalysts need to use metal supports, which have received special attention from researchers in recent years. Due to the existence of a wide range of metal supports and the need for accurate detection of higher H2 production, in this study, a systematic review and meta-analysis using ANNs were conducted to assess the hydrogen production by various catalysts in the dry reforming process. The Scopus, Embase, and Web of Science databases were investigated to retrieve the related articles from 1 January 2000 until 20 January 2021. Forty-seven articles containing 100 studies were included. To determine optimal models for three target factors (hydrocarbon conversion, hydrogen yield, and stability test time), artificial neural networks (ANNs) combined with differential evolution (DE) were applied. The best models obtained had an average relative error for the testing data of 0.52% for conversion, 3.36% for stability, and 0.03% for yield. These small differences between experimental results and predictions indicate a good generalization capability. Full article
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