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Visible and Hidden Energy Vulnerabilities in a Changing Climate

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "B1: Energy and Climate Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 1960

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Energy, Environment, Water Research Centre, The Cyprus Institute, 20 Konstantinou Kavafi Street, Nicosia 2121, Cyprus
Interests: sustainable energy use in the urban environment; smart buildings, urban and rural energy vulnerabilities and associated health issues

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Guest Editor
Energy, Environment, Water Research Centre, The Cyprus Institute, 20 Konstantinou Kavafi Street, Nicosia 2121, Cyprus
Interests: building physics; indoor environmental quality; occupant behavior; building performance simulation and optimization; adaptive and responsive building components; smart buildings; zero energy/emission neighborhoods
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Energy, Environment, Water Research Centre, The Cyprus Institute, 20 Konstantinou Kavafi Street, Nicosia 2121, Cyprus
Interests: decarbonisation of the economy; technical and economic aspects of new energy systems; behavioural shifts in energy use; clean mobility and transportation; energy futures and modelling of the Mediterranean and EU regions

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Guest Editor
Department of Social Policy, Sociology and Criminology School of Social Policy, Muirhead Tower, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
Interests: role of public policy and policymaking processes in shaping energy systems; structural inequalities in the distribution of housing and access to affordable and clean forms of energy; health and wellbeing outcomes; indicators for measuring the complex realities of energy poverty

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are inviting submissions to an upcoming Special Issue of Energies on the subject area of “Visible and Hidden Energy Vulnerabilities in a Changing Climate”. Energy vulnerability is the increased risk of being in a condition of having inadequate levels of materially and socially necessitated energy services in the home. Energy-vulnerable households or individuals possess a limited capacity to recover from difficulties and are susceptible to external agents related to energy access and affordability, with impacts on their physical and mental health. Disparities exist along the rural/urban dichotomy, with different externalities affecting populations of each locality; nevertheless, governance is often regulated through commonly applied policies. This Special Issue reflects on the multitude of manifestations of energy vulnerability and aims to bring forward work that reflects its multi-faceted repercussions at the micro and macro levels.

The aim of the Special Issue is to highlight how access and affordability to energy are currently being affected, both by the social and climatic disruptions experienced in the past years, as well as how they may be impacted in the near future.

Submissions should be original articles or reviews. Topics of interest for publication include, but are not limited to:

  • Energy vulnerability
  • Climate change
  • Energy poverty
  • Energy policy
  • Energy markets
  • Rural and urban areas
  • Public health
  • Sustainable energy systems
  • Just energy transition
  • Energy consumption
  • Impact of social externalities on energy vulnerability
  • Use of renewable energy to alleviate energy vulnerability

Dr. Ioanna Kyprianou
Prof. Dr. Salvatore Carlucci
Dr. Nestor Fylaktos
Dr. Harriet Thomson
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • energy vulnerability
  • climate change
  • energy poverty
  • energy policy
  • energy markets rural and urban areas
  • public health
  • sustainable energy systems
  • just energy transition
  • energy consumption
  • impact of social externalities on energy vulnerability
  • use of renewable energy to alleviate energy vulnerability

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

25 pages, 331 KiB  
Article
At the Intersection of Housing, Energy, and Mobility Poverty: Trapped in Social Exclusion
by Katrin Großmann, Helene Oettel and Leona Sandmann
Energies 2024, 17(8), 1925; https://doi.org/10.3390/en17081925 - 18 Apr 2024
Viewed by 632
Abstract
The individual debates on housing poverty, energy poverty, and mobility poverty for the most part overlook the interwoven nature of all three cost burdens, especially for low-income households. This study examines how the three cost factors interact on a household level, the consequences [...] Read more.
The individual debates on housing poverty, energy poverty, and mobility poverty for the most part overlook the interwoven nature of all three cost burdens, especially for low-income households. This study examines how the three cost factors interact on a household level, the consequences for those affected by cost burdens, and how they cope and negotiate their expenses. Our research comprises two sets of semi-structured interviews, one before and one during the energy crisis, to gain insight into household experiences and constraints. We found that the freedom to choose where and how to live largely determines how households heat their homes and organize their mobility. The housing crisis together with housing market mechanisms appears to be the main driver of this cost trap; and from here, a complex interplay of causal factors unfolds. Location, often conceived of in terms of an urban–rural divide, seems to be of secondary importance. The intersection of cost burdens results in stress, anxiety, and social exclusion, further limiting the capacity for coping. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Visible and Hidden Energy Vulnerabilities in a Changing Climate)
13 pages, 1632 KiB  
Article
Learning from the Past: The Impacts of Economic Crises on Energy Poverty Mortality and Rural Vulnerability
by Ioanna Kyprianou, Despina Serghides, Harriet Thomson and Salvatore Carlucci
Energies 2023, 16(13), 5217; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16135217 - 7 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1213
Abstract
The summer-dominated Mediterranean island of Cyprus is often considered in the contexts of beach tourism, sunny weather, and different types of business economic activities and services. In terms of its climatic conditions, extreme heat and mild winters characterise the island; yet, recent evidence [...] Read more.
The summer-dominated Mediterranean island of Cyprus is often considered in the contexts of beach tourism, sunny weather, and different types of business economic activities and services. In terms of its climatic conditions, extreme heat and mild winters characterise the island; yet, recent evidence has shown that winter poses a significant threat to public health. Its excess winter mortality is amongst the highest in Europe and there is an increased risk of energy-poverty-related mortality compared to total mortality. This study is an extension of previous research, with the objective of further scrutinizing the shift observed between urban and rural energy poverty mortality in the time of a severe nationwide financial crisis. Mortality and temperature data for the period of 2008–2018, as well as macroeconomic indicators, were investigated through a linear regression analysis. The results indicated that the declining economic situation of the island severely hit rural areas, with a significant increase in energy-poverty-related mortality, while urban areas were more resilient to this. There are three existing challenges linked to energy poverty: low incomes, high energy prices, and poor building energy efficiency. In Cyprus, all three coincide and are aggravated in times of crisis, creating conditions of extreme vulnerability for populations already in a disadvantaged position. This study’s motivation was to highlight the intense vulnerability associated with crises in Cyprus, and its outcomes call for higher levels of support at such times, especially when it comes to rural populations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Visible and Hidden Energy Vulnerabilities in a Changing Climate)
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