Factors Related to School Coexistence at Different Educational Stages

A special issue of European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education (ISSN 2254-9625).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2022) | Viewed by 17717

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

School coexistence is a transversal element that influences the performance of the educational center, the policies that are implemented, the stress levels of teachers, the academic results of students, the rate of bullying and cyberbullying, and many other aspects. The agents involved in the proper functioning of an educational center and the development of a pleasant climate of coexistence are families, teachers, and students, although ultimately the whole of society participates directly or indirectly in it. Relationships, interactions, and synergies are established between the different educational agents that must be studied and in which both internal and external variables intervene. The study of school coexistence covers all educational stages, from the beginning of schooling in nursery schools to the university, passing through the primary and secondary education stages. These last two stages have been studied more than the university. In order to obtain a clear picture of the current situation of school coexistence and to develop effective strategies to intervene in the problems affecting the school climate, it is necessary to take a global approach and analyze the phenomenon at various educational stages. The information gathered from the different studies will help to design prevention and intervention programs that are much more in line with the reality of teaching.

Dr. Juan Pedro Martínez Ramón
Dr. Inmaculada Méndez Mateo
Dr. Cecilia Ruiz Esteban
Dr. Francisco Manuel Morales Rodríguez
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • coexistence
  • attention to diversity
  • coping strategies
  • stress
  • bullying
  • cyberbullying
  • self-esteem
  • student
  • teachers
  • family
  • early childhood education
  • primary education
  • secondary education
  • tertiary education
  • university
  • prevention

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

23 pages, 1563 KiB  
Article
Interpretive Diversity Understanding, Parental Practices, and Contextual Factors Involved in Primary School-age Children’s Cheating and Lying Behavior
by Narcisa Prodan, Melania Moldovan, Simina Alexandra Cacuci and Laura Visu-Petra
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(11), 1621-1643; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12110114 - 11 Nov 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2143
Abstract
Dishonesty is an interpersonal process that relies on sophisticated socio-cognitive mechanisms embedded in a complex network of individual and contextual factors. The present study examined parental rearing practices, bilingualism, socioeconomic status, and children’s interpretive diversity understanding (i.e., the ability to understand the constructive [...] Read more.
Dishonesty is an interpersonal process that relies on sophisticated socio-cognitive mechanisms embedded in a complex network of individual and contextual factors. The present study examined parental rearing practices, bilingualism, socioeconomic status, and children’s interpretive diversity understanding (i.e., the ability to understand the constructive nature of the human mind) in relation to their cheating and lie-telling behavior. 196 school-age children (9–11 years old) participated in a novel trivia game-like temptation resistance paradigm to elicit dishonesty and to verify their interpretive diversity understanding. Results revealed that children’s decision to cheat and lie was positively associated with their understanding of the constructive nature of the human mind and with parental rejection. Children with rejective parents were more likely to lie compared to their counterparts. This may suggest that understanding social interactions and the relationship with caregivers can impact children’s cheating behavior and the extent to which they are willing to deceive about it. Understanding the constructive nature of the mind was also a positive predictor of children’s ability to maintain their lies. Finally, being bilingual and having a higher socioeconomic status positively predicted children’s deception, these intriguing results warranting further research into the complex network of deception influences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Factors Related to School Coexistence at Different Educational Stages)
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15 pages, 357 KiB  
Article
The Detection of Early Reading Performance and Its Relationship with Biopsychosocial Risk Factors in the Study of Learning Difficulties
by Cristina Quiroga Bernardos, Santiago López Gómez, Patricia María Iglesias Souto, Rosa María Rivas Torres and Eva María Taboada Ares
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(8), 1205-1219; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12080084 - 20 Aug 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1755
Abstract
The study of the multiple processes involved in learning how to read can contribute towards the early detection of good and bad readers. However, it is necessary to take into consideration different biopsychosocial risk factors (pre- and perigestational, neonatal, medical, developmental and family-related) [...] Read more.
The study of the multiple processes involved in learning how to read can contribute towards the early detection of good and bad readers. However, it is necessary to take into consideration different biopsychosocial risk factors (pre- and perigestational, neonatal, medical, developmental and family-related) that may have a significant impact on neurodevelopment, producing atypical cognitive development that could lead to the presence of reading difficulties. The objective of this study was to identify the main psycholinguistic abilities involved in the early reading performance and analyse their relationship to biopsychosocial risk factors. A total of 110 subjects between the ages of 4 and 7 years old and enrolled in state-run schools in Spain participated in the study. Significant correlations were found between different psycholinguistic abilities and certain biopsychosocial risk factors (having had hyperbilirubinemia, having obtained a score lower than 9 on the Apgar test, having had language problems or a sibling with dyslexia). This relationship should be taken into account in the study of learning difficulties as a potential indicator to predict later reading development and even the presence of developmental dyslexia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Factors Related to School Coexistence at Different Educational Stages)
16 pages, 647 KiB  
Article
Interpersonal Adaptation, Self-Efficacy, and Metacognitive Skills in Italian Adolescents with Specific Learning Disorders: A Cross-Sectional Study
by Elena Commodari, Valentina Lucia La Rosa, Elisabetta Sagone and Maria Luisa Indiana
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(8), 1034-1049; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12080074 - 10 Aug 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2297
Abstract
This study aimed to explore interpersonal adaptation, generalized self-efficacy, and metacognitive skills in a sample of Italian adolescents with and without a specific learning disorder (SLD). A total of 564 secondary and high school students (males = 236; females = 328; age range: [...] Read more.
This study aimed to explore interpersonal adaptation, generalized self-efficacy, and metacognitive skills in a sample of Italian adolescents with and without a specific learning disorder (SLD). A total of 564 secondary and high school students (males = 236; females = 328; age range: 11–19; M = 16.14, SD = 1.70) completed a set of standardized tests assessing social and interpersonal skills (non-affirmation, impulsiveness, narcissism, social preoccupation, and stress in social situations), general self-efficacy, and metacognition. Students with SLD reported a lower interpersonal adaptation than students without SLD. Furthermore, students with SLD were more impulsive and had more problems handling social situations. They also reported lower levels of self-efficacy but higher metacognition scores than peers without SLD. The use of compensatory tools was associated with better interpersonal skills and higher levels of self-efficacy in students with SLD. Finally, using these instruments is predictive of high levels of metacognitive skills in adolescents with SLD. In line with the previous literature, this study showed the presence of a gap between adolescents with and without an SLD in terms of interpersonal adaptation, general self-efficacy, and metacognitive skills in the school context. Further studies are needed on the psychological well-being of adolescents with SLD and especially on the protective role of personal, social, and environmental characteristics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Factors Related to School Coexistence at Different Educational Stages)
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12 pages, 455 KiB  
Article
Analysis of Spanish Parents’ Knowledge about ASD and Their Attitudes towards Inclusive Education
by Irene Gómez-Marí, Raúl Tárraga-Mínguez and Gemma Pastor-Cerezuela
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(7), 870-881; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12070063 - 21 Jul 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2796
Abstract
To make possible the inclusion of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in mainstream settings, parental knowledge and attitudes towards the disorder play a key role between the home and the school setting. However, prior literature has not carried out an in-depth analysis [...] Read more.
To make possible the inclusion of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in mainstream settings, parental knowledge and attitudes towards the disorder play a key role between the home and the school setting. However, prior literature has not carried out an in-depth analysis of parents’ knowledge about ASD and their attitudes toward the inclusion of children with this diagnosis. This study examined the parental attitudes towards inclusion and knowledge about ASD. Participants were parents of children with ASD (n = 75), parents of children without ASD whose children had prior or current contact with peers with ASD (n = 44), and parents of children with no previous interactions with a peer with ASD (n = 51). The Attitudes of Regular Educators Towards Inclusion for Students with Autism Survey and the Autism Knowledge Questionnaire were filled out. Nonparametric statistical tests were used. Results showed that parents of children with ASD have better knowledge about this disorder and hold more favorable attitudes towards the inclusion of children with ASD than the other parents. These findings suggest that the benefits of inclusive schooling are limited to the school setting and do not appear to affect families of children without ASD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Factors Related to School Coexistence at Different Educational Stages)
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16 pages, 2221 KiB  
Article
Impact of Using Facemasks on Literacy Learning: The Perception of Early Childhood Education Teachers
by Diego Vergara, Álvaro Antón-Sancho, Juan-José Maldonado and María Nieto-Sobrino
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(6), 639-654; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12060048 - 17 Jun 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2455
Abstract
In this work, quantitative research is carried out on the importance that educators give to literacy work in early childhood education classrooms and the impact that the COVID-19 pandemic and the use of facemasks have had on it. To this end, a survey [...] Read more.
In this work, quantitative research is carried out on the importance that educators give to literacy work in early childhood education classrooms and the impact that the COVID-19 pandemic and the use of facemasks have had on it. To this end, a survey designed for this purpose has been used, which has been passed on to a set of 112 Spanish early childhood educators. The teachers surveyed occupy different positions in the classroom (tutors, support technicians, specialists in bilingualism, therapeutic pedagogy and speech and hearing), and, in addition, they themselves learned to read from different methods of literacy learning (synthetic or analytical). The results found in this study indicate that educators express intermediate evaluations of the importance of literacy work in the classroom, higher if it is done through digital resources, and higher for the synthetic method than for the analytical method. In addition, the impact of the use of masks on literacy learning was rated as very negative. On the other hand, gaps have been identified in the above perceptions by the position occupied in the classroom and by the method used to learn to read. Finally, some actions are suggested to homogenize the perceptions of the different professionals, and some lines of research are proposed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Factors Related to School Coexistence at Different Educational Stages)
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22 pages, 324 KiB  
Article
Do Faculty Members Apply the Standards for Developing Gifted Students at Universities? An Exploratory Study
by Fathi Abunasser and Rommel AlAli
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(6), 579-600; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12060043 - 2 Jun 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1997
Abstract
Many studies indicate the importance of the management and nurturing of giftedness. They also focus on talent development, primarily, where the main objective is enhancing academic abilities. To achieve this goal, it is necessary to explore the reality of faculty members’ application of [...] Read more.
Many studies indicate the importance of the management and nurturing of giftedness. They also focus on talent development, primarily, where the main objective is enhancing academic abilities. To achieve this goal, it is necessary to explore the reality of faculty members’ application of talent development standards; this is necessary for laying the practical foundations to enhance the academic abilities of talented students according to the standards for verifying quality, and for clarifying the skills and concepts that are taught. The current study was based on the opinions of 122 faculty members from Saudi public universities who had experiences with gifted students, whereby they answered the following question: Do faculty members apply the standards for developing gifted students at universities? The data were collected by developing an instrument. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics that mostly showed the reality of the application of the selected gifted development standards. The results of the perceptions of the faculty members participating in the study showed differences in the application of the proposed gifted development standards according to their academic rank. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Factors Related to School Coexistence at Different Educational Stages)
13 pages, 672 KiB  
Article
Evaluating the Dimensionality of the Sociocultural Adaptation Scale in a Sample of International Students Sojourning in Los Angeles: Which Difference between Eastern and Western Culture?
by Giusy Danila Valenti, Paola Magnano and Palmira Faraci
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2022, 12(5), 465-477; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe12050035 - 18 May 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2953
Abstract
The Sociocultural Adaptation Scale (SCAS) measures the degree of sociocultural competence in new cultural settings, and, despite its popularity, research aiming at evaluating its dimensionality is lacking and has incongruent results. Moreover, the dimensionality of the scale has been mainly tested on different [...] Read more.
The Sociocultural Adaptation Scale (SCAS) measures the degree of sociocultural competence in new cultural settings, and, despite its popularity, research aiming at evaluating its dimensionality is lacking and has incongruent results. Moreover, the dimensionality of the scale has been mainly tested on different samples adjusted to Eastern culture. We administered the SCAS to 266 international students sojourning in Los Angeles to test which underlying dimensionality emerges if the measure is used to assess sociocultural adaptation to Western culture, also verifying its measurement invariance across sex. Findings from EFA showed a three-factor solution: Diversity Approach, Social Functioning, and Distance and Life Changes, and the CFA indicated a plausible goodness-of-fit to the empirical data. The examination of MGCFA suggested that the questionnaire showed an invariant structure across sex. Our results suggest that the dimensionality of the SCAS may differ according to the sojourners’ country of settlement, emphasizing Western–Eastern differences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Factors Related to School Coexistence at Different Educational Stages)
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