Special Issue "In Memory of Raffaele Gianotti"

A special issue of Dermatopathology (ISSN 2296-3529).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2022) | Viewed by 10579

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Carlo Francesco Tomasini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Clinical-Surgical, Diagnostic, and Pediatric Science, Institute of Dermatology, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy
Interests: histopathology; melanoma; pathology; immunohistochemistry; clinical dermatology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We have the privilege of dedicating this Special Issue to the memory of Prof. Raffaele Gianotti who sadly passed away very recently. Prof. Gianotti was a distinguished dermatopathologist and one of the most important names and pioneers of Italian dermatopathology. His essential vision of dermatopathology without frills, as the product of an indispensable integration between the clinic and the microscope has guided his work for decades. His inexhaustible academic energy, unwavering commitment and substantial contributions to cutaneous pathology were an inspiration to all of us. We are very lucky that we have had the privilege and honor of knowing two great Italian dermatologists, the father, Prof. Ferdinando Gianotti who described the "papular acrodermatitis of childhood (Gianotti-Crosti syndrome)", and the son, Prof. Raffaele Gianotti, a legendary dermatopathologist.

Raffaele, thank you for what you have done for dermatopathology, rest in peace, we will never forget you.

Prof. Dr. Gürkan Kaya 

Editor-in-Chief

Prof. Dr. Carlo Francesco Tomasini

Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Raffaele Gianotti
  • dermatopathology
  • memory

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Communication
Annular Lichenoid Dermatitis (of Youth)
Dermatopathology 2022, 9(1), 23-31; https://doi.org/10.3390/dermatopathology9010004 - 16 Jan 2022
Viewed by 1249
Abstract
About 20 years after its first description, Annular Lichenoid Dermatitis of Youth (ALDY) is recognized as a distinctive lichenoid dermatosis with specific clinical and histological features. The disease occurs mostly in young persons all over the world, runs a chronic course, and has [...] Read more.
About 20 years after its first description, Annular Lichenoid Dermatitis of Youth (ALDY) is recognized as a distinctive lichenoid dermatosis with specific clinical and histological features. The disease occurs mostly in young persons all over the world, runs a chronic course, and has an obscure etiopathogenesis. Clinically, lesions consist of persistent, asymptomatic erythematous macules and round-oval annular patches with a red-violaceous non-scaling border and central hypopigmentation, mostly localized on the groin and flanks. Histology shows a peculiar lichenoid dermatitis characterized by irregular epidermal hyperplasia with an alternation of thinned and quadrangular rete ridges and a dense band-like lichenoid infiltrate of lymphocytes in the papillary dermis. Typically, there is infiltration of lymphocytes into the lower epidermal layers with massive necrosis/apoptosis of keratinocytes, which is limited to the tips of rete ridges. Dermal lymphocytes are usually CD3+, CD4+, while most of the intraepidermal T cells are CD8+. Analysis of TCR-γ-chain gene rearrangement displayed polyclonality in all cases examined. Differential diagnosis mainly includes morphea, mycosis fungoides, annular erythemas and inflammatory lesions of vitiligo. Topical corticosteroids and topical tacrolimus represent the most effective drugs for ALDY treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue In Memory of Raffaele Gianotti)
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Article
Spitz Nevus with Features of Clark Nevus, So-Called SPARK Nevus: Case Series Presentation with Emphasis on Cytological and Histological Features
Dermatopathology 2021, 8(4), 525-530; https://doi.org/10.3390/dermatopathology8040055 - 01 Dec 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1433
Abstract
Background: SPARK nevus represents a little-known and characterized entity, with few case series available in the literature. Methods and results: we present a case series of 12 patients (6 F and 6 M) between January 2005 and December 2020 and conduct [...] Read more.
Background: SPARK nevus represents a little-known and characterized entity, with few case series available in the literature. Methods and results: we present a case series of 12 patients (6 F and 6 M) between January 2005 and December 2020 and conduct a review of the current literature. Ten articles were selected on the basis of the adopted inclusion criteria and the PRISMA guidelines. Conclusions: The definition of histopathological and dermoscopic criteria are important to allow for an agreement to be reached among dermopathologists, and for the development of a consensus on higher case studies. To our knowledge, there are not many case series in the literature, and ours is part of the attempt to increase the knowledge of an entity that remains little-known and characterized. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue In Memory of Raffaele Gianotti)
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Article
Primary Cutaneous Gamma-Delta T Cell Lymphomas: A Case Series and Overview of the Literature
Dermatopathology 2021, 8(4), 515-524; https://doi.org/10.3390/dermatopathology8040054 - 17 Nov 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1234
Abstract
Primary cutaneous gamma-delta T cell lymphomas (PCGDTCLs) are rare and aggressive cutaneous malignancies that have been diagnostically challenging for dermopathologists and clinicians since their first published descriptions in 1991. Since then, the availability of immunostaining for T cell receptors γ and δ in [...] Read more.
Primary cutaneous gamma-delta T cell lymphomas (PCGDTCLs) are rare and aggressive cutaneous malignancies that have been diagnostically challenging for dermopathologists and clinicians since their first published descriptions in 1991. Since then, the availability of immunostaining for T cell receptors γ and δ in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples has greatly increased our knowledge of the gamma-delta phenotype by showing that it may also be present in the context of indolent entities, such as mycosis fungoides (MFs) and lymphomatoid papulosis, and this has raised questions concerning its diagnostic and prognostic implications. We here describe the histological and clinical differences between the dermo-epidermal and subcutaneous sub-groups of PCGDTCL observed in a cohort of 20 patients attending a single experienced centre, with particular focus on cases with an MF-like presentation, which are still less well defined than those of classic MF. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue In Memory of Raffaele Gianotti)
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Article
Erosive Pustular Dermatosis of the Scalp: A Clinicopathologic Study of Fifty Cases
Dermatopathology 2021, 8(4), 450-462; https://doi.org/10.3390/dermatopathology8040048 - 23 Sep 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1312
Abstract
Erosive pustular dermatosis of the scalp (EPDS) is an uncommon, pustular, idiopathic disorder typically occurring on the scalp of the elderly, whose diagnosis requires close clinicopathologic correlations. Recently, the primary histopathologic characteristic of EPDS has been identified in some biopsies from hair-bearing scalp [...] Read more.
Erosive pustular dermatosis of the scalp (EPDS) is an uncommon, pustular, idiopathic disorder typically occurring on the scalp of the elderly, whose diagnosis requires close clinicopathologic correlations. Recently, the primary histopathologic characteristic of EPDS has been identified in some biopsies from hair-bearing scalp lesions as a sterile, vesiculo-pustule involving the infundibulum of hair follicles. To further delineate the clinicopathologic spectrum of the disease, we led a retrospective study of 50 patients (36 males and 14 females) with a diagnosis of EPDS between 2011 and 2021, reviewing clinical and histopathological data. Androgenetic alopecia was present in 32 patients. Triggering factors were present in 21 patients. The vertex was the most common location; one patient also had leg involvement. Two cases were familial. Disease presentation varied markedly from tiny, erosive, scaly lesions to crusted and hemorrhagic plaques, mimicking pustular pyoderma gangrenosum (PPG). Biopsies of patients with severe androgenetic or total baldness produced specimens showing nonspecific pathologic changes (39/50), while in 11 patients with a hair-bearing scalp histopathologic examination, changes were specific. The clinicopathologic similarities between EPDS and PPG suggest that EPDS should be included in the spectrum of autoinflammatory dermatoses. Clinicians could consider the possibility of associated disorders rather than managing EPDS as a sui generis skin disorder. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue In Memory of Raffaele Gianotti)
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Case Report
Blisters and Milia around the Peritoneal Dialysis Catheter: A Case of Localized Bullous Pemphigoid
Dermatopathology 2022, 9(3), 282-286; https://doi.org/10.3390/dermatopathology9030033 - 04 Aug 2022
Viewed by 272
Abstract
We report on the appearance of multiple tense blisters surrounding the exit site of a Tenckhoff catheter in a 79-year-old woman with end-stage renal disease in peritoneal dialysis. The differential diagnoses included a contact allergic or irritative dermatitis to peritoneal dialysis catheter material [...] Read more.
We report on the appearance of multiple tense blisters surrounding the exit site of a Tenckhoff catheter in a 79-year-old woman with end-stage renal disease in peritoneal dialysis. The differential diagnoses included a contact allergic or irritative dermatitis to peritoneal dialysis catheter material and antiseptic agents, bacterial infection, and herpes virus infection, but milia were a clue for a subepidermal blistering disease and lead to appropriate investigations. The laboratory findings, the histopathological examination and the direct immunofluorescence assay confirmed the diagnosis of localized bullous pemphigoid. The disorder typically occurs in elderly people and may be related to drugs, hematological malignancies or neurological conditions but it can also be a complication of hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue In Memory of Raffaele Gianotti)
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Commentary
Conceptual Evolution and Current Approach to Spitz Tumors
Dermatopathology 2022, 9(2), 136-142; https://doi.org/10.3390/dermatopathology9020017 - 26 Apr 2022
Viewed by 861
Abstract
Over the past several decades, the study of Spitz neoplasms has flourished, with expanded conceptualization and refined terminology, providing a framework for the assessment and classification of Spitz nevi, atypical Spitz Tumors, and Spitz melanoma. Cancer genomics have generated concepts such as driver [...] Read more.
Over the past several decades, the study of Spitz neoplasms has flourished, with expanded conceptualization and refined terminology, providing a framework for the assessment and classification of Spitz nevi, atypical Spitz Tumors, and Spitz melanoma. Cancer genomics have generated concepts such as driver and passenger genes and clonal evolution, which can be applied to Spitz tumors. Herein, we provide a historical perspective, followed by a summary of current knowledge and clinical approaches for these challenging tumors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue In Memory of Raffaele Gianotti)
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Case Report
Morphea Profunda with Tertiary Lymphoid Follicles: Description of Two Cases and Review of the Literature
Dermatopathology 2022, 9(1), 17-22; https://doi.org/10.3390/dermatopathology9010003 - 10 Jan 2022
Viewed by 1205
Abstract
Morphea profunda or subcutaneous (deep) morphea is a variant of localized morphea, characterized by one or more ill-defined, deep sclerotic plaque. Preferential sites are the abdomen, trunk, sacral area, or extremities. The presence of hyperplastic lymphoid follicles in the context of the sclerotic [...] Read more.
Morphea profunda or subcutaneous (deep) morphea is a variant of localized morphea, characterized by one or more ill-defined, deep sclerotic plaque. Preferential sites are the abdomen, trunk, sacral area, or extremities. The presence of hyperplastic lymphoid follicles in the context of the sclerotic bands of morphea is rarely described. Localized scleroderma is sustained by a profibrotic inflammatory profile. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), an imbalance between functional subclasses of T-lymphocytes (innate immune cells) has a role in activate collagen deposition. In this case report, we present two cases of morphea profunda with lymphoid follicular hyperplasia. A systematic review of the literature on the pathophysiology of localized scleroderma is also presented, with particular reference to the presence of lymphoid structures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue In Memory of Raffaele Gianotti)
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Case Report
Primary Localized Cutaneous Nodular Amyloidosis and Limited Cutaneous Systemic Sclerosis: Additional Cases with Dermatoscopic and Histopathological Correlation of Amyloid Deposition
Dermatopathology 2021, 8(3), 229-235; https://doi.org/10.3390/dermatopathology8030028 - 02 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1569
Abstract
Primary localized cutaneous nodular amyloidosis (PLCNA) is a rare condition due to the plasma cell proliferation and skin deposition of immunoglobulin light chains, without systemic amyloidosis or hematological dyscrasias. The association with autoimmune connective tissue diseases has been reported, especially with Sjogren’s syndrome, [...] Read more.
Primary localized cutaneous nodular amyloidosis (PLCNA) is a rare condition due to the plasma cell proliferation and skin deposition of immunoglobulin light chains, without systemic amyloidosis or hematological dyscrasias. The association with autoimmune connective tissue diseases has been reported, especially with Sjogren’s syndrome, and in a few cases with systemic sclerosis. Herein, we describe three cases of PLCNA occurring in women with a diagnosis of limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis and review the literature on the topic to highlight a stereotypical presentation. Moreover, we support the usefulness of dermoscopy, characterized by a yellow–orange waxy pattern surrounded by telangiectasias, for a rapid and non-invasive diagnostic assessment. Thus, when asymptomatic nodules occur on lower limbs of women affected with limited systemic sclerosis, and dermoscopy identifies yellow–orange blotches, a diagnosis of PLCNA can be considered and further confirmed by histopathology. Monitoring for systemic amyloidosis development is advisable, although the risk of progression is considered very low. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue In Memory of Raffaele Gianotti)
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