Special Issue "New Cancer and Osteoporosis Therapies and Osteonecrosis of the Jaws, Volume Ⅱ"

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Christian Walter
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Medical Centre, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Augustusplatz 2, 55131 Mainz, Germany
Interests: bisphosphonate associated osteonecrosis; osteomyelitis; squamous cell carcinoma; traumatology; implantology; bisphosphonate; RankL
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

More than 10 years ago, bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis was described for the first time, opening a new research field describing epidemiologic and patho-etiologic data, as well as prevention, diagnostic, and therapy regimes for this new disease. In 2006, more than 150 articles on this topic were published, and since 2009 more than 200 new articles have been listed in PubMed each year, showing the progress of research in this area. In recent years, new active ingredients have been developed and implemented into anti-cancer and osteoporosis therapy, such as RankL inhibitors and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, which lead to osteonecrosis as well.

This Special Issue is interested in all aspects of all dental specialties dealing with this topic. In addition to basic research regarding pathology, prevention, and treatment, clinical topics are of interest. How is dental treatment affected by anti-resorptive therapies, e.g., surgical procedures (tooth extractions, implantology, etc.), periodontal, orthodontic, or endodontic treatment?

Dr. Christian Walter
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Medication associated/related/induced osteonecrosis of the jaws
  • Bisphosphonate
  • RankL inhibitor
  • Tyrosine kinase inhibitors
  • VEGF inhibitors
  • Epidemiology
  • Prevalence and incidence
  • Etiology and pathology
  • Microbiological factors
  • Influence of bisphosphonates/medication on the bone
  • Influence of bisphosphonates/medication on the immune system
  • Influence of bisphosphonates/medication on soft tissues
  • Risk factors
  • Prevention
  • Diagnosis
  • Histology
  • Therapy
  • Periodontal treatment
  • Dental implants
  • Orthodontic treatment
  • Complications
  • Animal models

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Article
Differential MicroRNA Expression of miR-21 and miR-155 within Oral Cancer Extracellular Vesicles in Response to Melatonin
Dent. J. 2019, 7(2), 48; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7020048 - 01 May 2019
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 2548
Abstract
Objective: Extracellular vesicles derived from oral cancer cells, which include Exosomes and Oncosomes, are membranous vesicles secreted into the surrounding extracellular environment. These extracellular vesicles can regulate and modulate oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) progression through the horizontal transfer of bioactive molecules including [...] Read more.
Objective: Extracellular vesicles derived from oral cancer cells, which include Exosomes and Oncosomes, are membranous vesicles secreted into the surrounding extracellular environment. These extracellular vesicles can regulate and modulate oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) progression through the horizontal transfer of bioactive molecules including proteins, lipids and microRNA (miRNA). The primary objective of this study was to examine the potential to isolate and evaluate extracellular vesicles (including exosomes) from various oral cancer cell lines and to explore potential differences in miRNA content. Methods: The OSCC cell lines SCC9, SCC25 and CAL27 were cultured in DMEM containing 10% exosome-free fetal bovine serum. Cell-culture conditioned media was collected for exosome and extracellular vesicle isolation after 72 h. Isolation was completed using the Total Exosome Isolation reagent (Invitrogen) and extracellular vesicle RNA was purified using the Total Exosome RNA isolation kit (Invitrogen). Extracellular vesicle miRNA content was evaluated using primers specific for miR-16, -21, -133a and -155. Results: Extracellular vesicles were successfully isolated from all three OSCC cell lines and total extracellular vesicle RNA was isolated. Molecular screening using primers specific for several miRNA revealed differential baseline expression among the different cell lines. The addition of melatonin significantly reduced the expression of miR-155 in all of the OSCC extracellular vesicles. However, miR-21 was significantly increased in each of the three OSCC isolates. No significant changes in miR-133a expression were observed under melatonin administration. Conclusions: Although many studies have documented changes in gene expression among various cancers under melatonin administration, few studies have evaluated these effects on microRNAs. These results may be among the first to evaluate the effects of melatonin on microRNA expression in oral cancers, which suggests the differential modulation of specific microRNAs, such as miR-21, miR-133a and miR-155, may be of significant importance when evaluating the mechanisms and pathways involved in melatonin-associated anti-tumor effects. Full article
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Review

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Review
Animal Experiments in Periodontal and Peri-Implant Research: Are There Any Changes?
Dent. J. 2019, 7(2), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7020046 - 01 May 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1529
Abstract
Animal experiments are a source of debate. This bibliometric study aims to identify published research in two representative dental journals: the Journal of Periodontology (JP) and the Journal of Clinical Periodontology (JCP). Two time points (1982/83 and 2012/13) covering 30 years were chosen. [...] Read more.
Animal experiments are a source of debate. This bibliometric study aims to identify published research in two representative dental journals: the Journal of Periodontology (JP) and the Journal of Clinical Periodontology (JCP). Two time points (1982/83 and 2012/13) covering 30 years were chosen. Articles describing data from animal experiments were identified and the data were extracted and compared between journals and time points. In 1982/83, 27 animal studies were published in JP and 17 in JCP. For 2012/13, 54 animal studies were considered in JP and 37 in JCP. The species examined were predominantly dogs (37%) in JCP and rats (61%) in JP in 1982/83. In 2012/13, rodents accounted for 85% in JP and for 54% in JCP. The number of animals used per study increased by a factor of 1.6–2.6. The diversity of geographic origin and articles from emerging countries increased over time. The number of animals examined per study and the publications describing these experiments seemed to have increased in the journals analyzed in the last decades. Full article
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Other

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Comment
Reply to Comment—Osteonecrosis of the Jaw in Myeloma Patients Receiving Denosumab or Zoledronic Acid. Comment on Pivotal Trial by Raje et al. Published in Lancet Oncology
Dent. J. 2019, 7(2), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7020054 - 16 May 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1363
Abstract
We read the comment by Fusco et al [...] Full article
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Comment
Osteonecrosis of the Jaw in Myeloma Patients Receiving Denosumab or Zoledronic Acid. Comment on Pivotal Trial by Raje et al. Published on Lancet Oncology
Dent. J. 2018, 6(3), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj6030042 - 01 Sep 2018
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2221
Abstract
The recent randomized trial, published by Raje et al., on Lancet Oncology is potentially practice changing. It proposes that denosumab is a valid alternative to zoledronic acid in the treatment of myeloma patients. However, several points need further data and more details, such [...] Read more.
The recent randomized trial, published by Raje et al., on Lancet Oncology is potentially practice changing. It proposes that denosumab is a valid alternative to zoledronic acid in the treatment of myeloma patients. However, several points need further data and more details, such as information on incidence, diagnosis, and follow-up of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) cases, observed among treated patients. Adopted definition to adjudicate ONJ cases, type of registration of potential ONJ cases, length of observation are possible causes of potential underestimation of ONJ incidence in their study. Future updated evaluations with longer follow-up, and including actuarial estimation, are required for final judgment on ONJ risk in myeloma patients receiving denosumab, and comparison with ONJ risk by zoledronic acid. Full article
Case Report
Meth Mouth—A Growing Epidemic in Dentistry?
Dent. J. 2017, 5(4), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj5040029 - 30 Oct 2017
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 6755
Abstract
In the past two decades, the synthetic style and fashion drug “crystal meth” (“crystal”, “meth”), chemically representing the crystalline form of the methamphetamine hydrochloride, has become more and more popular in the United States, in Eastern Europe, and just recently in Central and [...] Read more.
In the past two decades, the synthetic style and fashion drug “crystal meth” (“crystal”, “meth”), chemically representing the crystalline form of the methamphetamine hydrochloride, has become more and more popular in the United States, in Eastern Europe, and just recently in Central and Western Europe. “Meth” is cheap, easy to synthesize and to market, and has an extremely high potential for abuse and dependence. As a strong sympathomimetic, “meth” has the potency to switch off hunger, fatigue and, pain while simultaneously increasing physical and mental performance. The most relevant side effects are heart and circulatory complaints, severe psychotic attacks, personality changes, and progressive neurodegeneration. Another effect is “meth mouth”, defined as serious tooth and oral health damage after long-standing “meth” abuse; this condition may become increasingly relevant in dentistry and oral- and maxillofacial surgery. There might be an association between general methamphetamine abuse and the development of osteonecrosis, similar to the medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (MRONJ). Several case reports concerning “meth” patients after tooth extractions or oral surgery have presented clinical pictures similar to MRONJ. This overview summarizes the most relevant aspect concerning “crystal meth” abuse and “meth mouth”. Full article
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