Special Issue "Pediatric Dentistry-1"

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jeffrey A. Banas

Department of Pediatrics, University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA
Website | E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue will cover several aspects of pediatric dentistry with an emphasis on childhood caries.  Among the topics will be the epidemiology of caries and health disparities.  The uneven epidemiology has consequences for caries risk assessment, treatment plans, patient/parent motivation, and public health measures, each itself a topic to be explored.  Also considered will be new insights into the microbial etiology of caries which may drive changes in prevention and treatment as will new knowledge related to genetic susceptibilities.  Finally, the traditional but highly relevant factors of diet and hygiene will be covered.

Prof. Dr. Jeffrey A. Banas
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • early childhood caries
  • caries risk assessment
  • cariogenic
  • oral health disparities
  • caries prevention
  • cariology
  • microbiology of caries
  • pediatric dentistry

Published Papers (3 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-3
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle High Birth Weight Is a Risk Factor of Dental Caries Increment during Adolescence in Sweden
Dent. J. 2014, 2(4), 118-133; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj2040118
Received: 30 September 2014 / Revised: 31 August 2014 / Accepted: 3 November 2014 / Published: 20 November 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (250 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study aimed to assess whether birth weight is associated with dental caries during the teenage period. In this register-based cohort study, all children of 13 years of age (n = 18,142) who resided in the county of Stockholm, Sweden, in 2000, were
[...] Read more.
This study aimed to assess whether birth weight is associated with dental caries during the teenage period. In this register-based cohort study, all children of 13 years of age (n = 18,142) who resided in the county of Stockholm, Sweden, in 2000, were included. The cohort was followed until individuals were 19 years of age. Information regarding dental caries was collected from the Public Health Care Administration in Stockholm. Data concerning prenatal and perinatal factors and parental socio-demographic determinants were collected from the Swedish Medical Birth Register and National Registers at Statistics Sweden. The final logistic regression model showed that birth weight ≥4000 g, adjusted for potential confounders, was significantly associated with caries increment (DMFT ≥ 1 (D = decayed, M = missing, F = filled, T = teeth)) between 13 and 19 age (OR, 1.22; 95% CI = 1.09–1.36). The relatively enhanced risk OR was further increased from 1.22 to 1.43 in subjects with birth weight ≥4600 g. On the contrary, subjects with birth weight <2500 g exhibited a significantly lower risk (OR, 0.67; 95% CI = 0.50–0.89) for exhibiting caries experience (DMFT ≥ 4) at 19 years of age. In conclusion, high birth weight can be regarded as a predictor for dental caries, and especially, birth weight ≥4500 g is a risk factor for caries increment during adolescence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Dentistry-1)
Open AccessArticle Improving Oral Health Status of Children in Tabuk, Saudi Arabia
Dent. J. 2014, 2(1), 22-40; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj2010022
Received: 17 January 2014 / Revised: 13 February 2014 / Accepted: 14 February 2014 / Published: 19 February 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (512 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This comprehensive community health intervention aimed to improve the oral health and reduce the incidence of dental caries in Tabuk schoolchildren. The program supports the public health pyramid that provides a framework to improve health and included creating and evaluating a school oral
[...] Read more.
This comprehensive community health intervention aimed to improve the oral health and reduce the incidence of dental caries in Tabuk schoolchildren. The program supports the public health pyramid that provides a framework to improve health and included creating and evaluating a school oral health surveillance system, applying fluoride varnish and dental sealants on high- and medium-caries risk children, and providing treatment for existing diseases. In a pilot phase, 48 children (26 males 22 females; mean age 6.42; dmft 9.33, Decayed, Missing, or Filled Primary and Permanent Teeth (DMFT) 3.27) received the dental services, both treatment and prevention. Three hundred seventy-eight composite resin or resin-modified light-cured glass ionomer restorations were placed. One-hundred and eighteen teeth received pulp therapy (pulpotomy or pulpectomy), ten of which received stainless steel crowns. A total of 72 teeth were extracted due to caries. To understand the effects of dental disease on children, as perceived by parents, an oral health-related quality of life survey was completed and analyzed. Results found an underestimation of the role the teeth play, particularly primary teeth, in the general health and wellbeing of the child. The program’s main evaluation effort focused on the process and outcome objectives, including the number of children received care, number of teeth received restorations and sealants, and number of children received fluoride varnish, etc. Analyzing the effect of the program on oral hygiene revealed an improvement in oral health, as a direct result of oral health educational sessions and one-to-one counseling. There is an urgent need to expand the program to include all primary schools. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Dentistry-1)
Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Caries Experience and Salivary Parameters among Overweight Children and Adolescents
Dent. J. 2013, 1(4), 31-40; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj1040031
Received: 8 October 2013 / Revised: 26 October 2013 / Accepted: 30 October 2013 / Published: 4 November 2013
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (202 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Obesity is a chronic disease characterized by excess body fat, which can lead to other health problems, including insulin resistance, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, polycystic ovary syndrome, hypertension, dyslipidemia, sleep apnea, asthma, heart attack, stroke, atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome. Currently, obesity and dental
[...] Read more.
Obesity is a chronic disease characterized by excess body fat, which can lead to other health problems, including insulin resistance, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, polycystic ovary syndrome, hypertension, dyslipidemia, sleep apnea, asthma, heart attack, stroke, atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome. Currently, obesity and dental caries are major public health concerns and dietary habits are a very important common component of their etiological factors, showing some correlation with the sociodemographic characteristics of individuals presenting these diseases. In relation to caries experience, the literature suggests a correlation between obesity and dental caries in children and adolescents, in primary and/or permanent dentition, though divergent results exist regarding assessment based on the method recommended by the WHO (1997), i.e., restricted to carious lesions with cavitation. Some studies indicate greater prevalence of proximal carious lesions in obese adolescents compared with those with normal weight. Salivary changes, such as the concentrations of phosphate, sialic acid, proteins and immunoglobulins and in peroxidase activity could explain the increased probability of obese children presenting greater risk of dental caries. Thus, it is important to consider the contribution of salivary parameters in caries experience of overweight children and adolescents and the implementation of preventive measures in this population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Dentistry-1)
Back to Top