Special Issue "Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery"

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Gherlone Felice Enrico
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Dentistry, IRCCS San Raffaele Hospital and Dental School, Vita Salute University, Milan, Italy
Interests: oral surgery; maxillofacial surgery; oral pathology; implant; digital dentistry; prosthodontics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue entitled “Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery” offers comprehensive coverage of new techniques, upfront developments, and innovative ideas in oral and maxillofacial surgery, including interdisciplinary aspects of cranial, facial, oral diseases, and their management.

The journal publishes articles that serve as a guide in the critical clinical practice of oral and maxillofacial surgery with an accurate insight to the future, and with attention to scientific literature.

Therefore, it is a subject that involves many specific topics such as aesthetic facial surgery, clinical pathology, computer-assisted surgery, congenital and craniofacial deformities, dentoalveolar surgery, head and neck oncology, implant dentistry, oral medicine, orthognathic surgery, reconstructive surgery, skull base surgery, TMJ, and trauma.

The innovation of this Special Issue will be a special attention to patients with systemic diseases, i.e., patients with HIV and neoplastic diseases, patients taking bisphosphonates or anticoagulation drugs, which are, today, contrary to the past, a daily practice in social dentistry.

The Special Issue promotes articles investigating the causes of the disease; therefore, with regard to oral pathology, it will investigate the causes, processes, and effects of such diseases.

The use of innovative dental technologies or devices including digital or computer-controlled components to carry out oral procedures will be another key point of the present Special Issue: Digital dentistry is now comprehensively accepted in a highly competitive scientific and clinical background.

Therefore, this will be a collection of articles by internationally renowned researchers and clinicians that will serve as a clinical practice manual to treat patients who are key players in social dentistry, to investigate the causes of diseases, and to promote minimally invasive and innovative oral and maxillofacial surgery.

Prof. Gherlone Felice Enrico
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • oral surgery
  • maxillofacial surgery
  • oral pathology
  • implant
  • digital dentistry
  • prosthodontics

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Primary Stability of Three Different Osteotomy Techniques in Medullary Bone: An in Vitro Study
Dent. J. 2020, 8(1), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8010021 - 21 Feb 2020
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 1131
Abstract
Background: The aim of this in vitro study was to analyse the primary stability of 20 implants placed with Twist drills (TD) versus 20 implants placed with Summers osteotomes (SO) and 20 implants placed with B&B bone compactors (BC) in medullary bone (quality [...] Read more.
Background: The aim of this in vitro study was to analyse the primary stability of 20 implants placed with Twist drills (TD) versus 20 implants placed with Summers osteotomes (SO) and 20 implants placed with B&B bone compactors (BC) in medullary bone (quality type III and type IV). Methods: The implants were placed in 10 fresh pig ribs fixed on a bench vice in order to avoid micro-movements during surgical procedures and measure recording. Peak insertion torque (PIT) and Peak removal torque (PRT) were recorded with MGT-12 digital torque gauge and ISQ was recorded through OSSTELL ISQ™ device by an independent operator. Results: Comparing our data (Tukey test p = 0.05), it was evidenced a statistically significant difference in the PIT between TD and BC groups (p = 0.01). Analysing ISQ data, there was a statistically significant difference between the TD and BC groups (p = 0.0001) and between the SO and BC groups (p = 0.014). The analysis of PRT evidenced a statistically significant difference between the TD and BC groups (p = 0.038). Conclusions: This study evidenced that bone compactor preparation can positively influence primary implant stability (PS), however further in vivo studies and a larger sample are necessary to assess the usefulness in several clinical settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
CD163+ Foamy Macrophages Are Associated with the Morphogenesis of Oral Verruciform Xanthoma through Angiogenesis by VEGF Expression: An Immunohistochemical Study
Dent. J. 2020, 8(1), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8010018 - 14 Feb 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1107
Abstract
Oral verruciform xanthoma (OVX) is an uncommon benign lesion that is characterized histologically by the accumulation of several foamy macrophages in the lamina propria papillae. The pathogenesis of OVX has not been completely elucidated, although the significance of macrophage polarization (M1, tumor suppression; [...] Read more.
Oral verruciform xanthoma (OVX) is an uncommon benign lesion that is characterized histologically by the accumulation of several foamy macrophages in the lamina propria papillae. The pathogenesis of OVX has not been completely elucidated, although the significance of macrophage polarization (M1, tumor suppression; and M2, tumor promotion) and the contribution of M2 macrophages to angiogenesis are well established. This study investigated the role of foamy macrophages in OVX, with a focus on angiogenesis. Four patients who underwent surgical excision or total excisional biopsy for OVXs were enrolled in this study. We evaluated the expression of the macrophage markers CD68 (broad) and CD163 (M2) and the CD34-positive microvessel density (MVD) of OVXs. The foamy macrophages of all patients exhibited positivity to CD68 and CD163. We evaluated the MVD and the expression of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) based on histological architecture. The MVD of all OVX cases was significantly higher than that of the corresponding normal epithelia. Interestingly, the MVD of verrucous-type OVX cases was higher than that of the other type. VEGF was expressed on foamy macrophages in all cases. Overall, the foamy macrophages expressing CD163 were associated with the morphogenesis of OVX through the process of angiogenesis by VEGF expression. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Use of an Oral Device in the Stabilization of Facial Advancement after Early Removal of the Osteodistraction Device for Postoperative Sequelae
Dent. J. 2020, 8(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8010012 - 19 Jan 2020
Viewed by 1287
Abstract
The aim of this study is to present an oral device that improves splanchnocranium stability after osteodistraction in children treated for correction of craniofacial malformations. When removal of the distraction device before the end of the treatment is necessary, the reposition of a [...] Read more.
The aim of this study is to present an oral device that improves splanchnocranium stability after osteodistraction in children treated for correction of craniofacial malformations. When removal of the distraction device before the end of the treatment is necessary, the reposition of a new fixation system might not be possible. In these cases, regrown bone is immature, and relapse of malformation occurs frequently. We have been treating these cases by the application of an oral device named Maxillary Advancement Contention (MAC). MAC is used in every patient when any complication interrupts the protocol of osteodistraction before the end of the stabilization time. The device is placed immediately after the removal of the distraction device and left in place for at least three months. We used MAC in six children surgically treated for correction of craniosynostosis with facial or craniofacial advancement. To establish the relapse of malformation we analyzed relations Sella-Nasion-Orbitale (SNOr) and Sella-Nasion-A point (SNA) angles before application of the MAC and after one year. The analysis of stability was excellent in every patient. This device might help, with a minimally invasive procedure, to maintain the obtained advancement allowing stabilization of the regrown bone. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop