Special Issue "Advanced Ceramics, Additive Manufacturing, and Technologies in Dentistry"

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767). This special issue belongs to the section "Digital Technologies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 21 February 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Amirali Zandinejad
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Comprehensive Dentistry, Texas A&M University, College of Dentistry, Dallas, TX, USA
Interests: additive manufacturing; 3D printing; ceramic 3D printing; digital dentistry; esthetic and implant

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

We are delighted to invite you to submit a manuscript to our Special Issue on “Advanced Technologies and Materials in Dentistry”. This issue is designed to reflect the latest technologies in digital dentistry, latest developments in dental ceramics, mostly zirconia, and the utilization of additive manufacturing or 3D printing in dentistry. 

Digital dentistry is becoming the key element in our daily practice of dentistry. As the technology evolves in this field, more creative and accurate ways of designing and manufacturing appear and provide more options to dental practitioners for more efficiency and accuracy. Sharing the newest technologies, innovations, and creative ideas and techniques is a great way to improve this exciting new field of dentistry. 

Dental ceramics are great materials and provide ultimate aesthetics and biocompatibility. The appearance of zirconia, with its unique mechanical properties, opens up a new era for using ceramics in dentistry. The constant change in its optical, mechanical, and bonding properties need to be shared with dentists around the word to help them to stay updated regarding this exciting material.

Although subtractive technology or milling is still the main manufacturing technique, additive manufacturing or 3D printing offers many advantages over subtractive technology and is becoming more popular in dentistry. Additive manufacturing is relatively new in dentistry with many indications. It can be used to manufacture metals, resins, and ceramics. Any publications to review this technology or elaborate its indication, application, limitation, and accuracy in dentistry would be very helpful to scientifically introduce this new technology to the dental community.

For this special Issue, all systematic reviews, review particles, research articles, clinical articles, case reports, and techniques on advanced technologies and materials including digital dentistry, CAD/CAM systems, new ceramics, zirconia, additive manufacturing, and 3D printing in dentistry will be considered.

Prof. Dr. Amirali Zandinejad
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Additive manufacturing
  • 3D printing
  • Advanced dental ceramics
  • Zirconia
  • Digital dentistry

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
The Fracture Resistance of Additively Manufactured Monolithic Zirconia vs. Bi-Layered Alumina Toughened Zirconia Crowns When Cemented to Zirconia Abutments. Evaluating the Potential of 3D Printing of Ceramic Crowns: An In Vitro Study
Dent. J. 2021, 9(10), 115; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj9100115 - 08 Oct 2021
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Abstract
(1) Background: This study compared the fracture resistance of additively manufactured monolithic zirconia and bi-layered alumina toughened zirconia crowns on implants. (2) Methods: Maxillary model with a dental implant replacing right second bicuspid was obtained. Custom abutments and full-contour crowns for additively manufactured [...] Read more.
(1) Background: This study compared the fracture resistance of additively manufactured monolithic zirconia and bi-layered alumina toughened zirconia crowns on implants. (2) Methods: Maxillary model with a dental implant replacing right second bicuspid was obtained. Custom abutments and full-contour crowns for additively manufactured monolithic zirconia and bi-layered alumina reinforced zirconia crowns (n = 10) were fabricated. The crowns were cemented to implant-supported zirconia abutments and the assembly fixed onto resin blocks. Fracture resistance was measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 2 mm/min. A Kruskal–Wallis test was used to analyze the data. (3) Results: Although additively manufactured monolithic zirconia crowns demonstrated a higher mean fracture resistance than bi-layered alumina toughened zirconia crowns, statistical analysis revealed no significant difference in fracture resistance between the two groups. All specimens fractured at the implant–abutment interface. (4) Conclusions: Additively manufactured bi-layered alumina toughened zirconia crowns demonstrated similar fracture resistance to additively manufactured monolithic zirconia crowns when cemented to implant-supported zirconia abutments. Full article
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Article
Assessment of Tooth Preparations Submitted to Dental Laboratories for Fabrication of Monolithic Zirconia Crowns
Dent. J. 2021, 9(10), 112; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj9100112 - 27 Sep 2021
Viewed by 729
Abstract
Purpose: The objective of this study was to assess the quality of posterior teeth prepared for monolithic zirconia crowns. Materials and Methods: A total of 392 STL-files of posterior preparations for monolithic zirconia crowns were evaluated in this study. Three-dimensional (3D) images were [...] Read more.
Purpose: The objective of this study was to assess the quality of posterior teeth prepared for monolithic zirconia crowns. Materials and Methods: A total of 392 STL-files of posterior preparations for monolithic zirconia crowns were evaluated in this study. Three-dimensional (3D) images were evaluated using a software (3D Viewer; 3Shape A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark) for finish line design, finish line width, occluso-cervical dimension, total occlusal convergence (TOC), intercuspal angulation, finish line quality, line angle form, and presence or absence of undercut at the axial wall and unsupported lip of enamel. The assessment was performed by two calibrated evaluators. Then, data were descriptively analyzed. Data for occluso-cervical dimension and TOC were descriptively analyzed according to their location. Results: Thirty-nine percent of premolars, 77% of first molars, and 91% of second molars had an average occluso-cervical dimension of less than 3 mm (premolars) and 4 mm (molars), with most of the preparations having a TOC of more than 20 degrees. More than 50% of preparations had undercut, unsupported enamel and/or unacceptable finish line quality. Conclusions: The quality of tooth preparation including finish line quality, absence of unsupported enamel and undercut at the axial wall should be evaluated when preparing monolithic zirconia crowns. Full article
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Review

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Review
Additive Manufacturing of Zirconia Ceramic and Its Application in Clinical Dentistry: A Review
Dent. J. 2021, 9(9), 104; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj9090104 - 06 Sep 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1148
Abstract
Additive manufacturing (AM) has many advantages and became a valid manufacturing technique for polymers and metals in dentistry. However, its application for dental ceramics is still in process. Among dental ceramics, zirconia is becoming popular and widely used in dentistry mainly due to [...] Read more.
Additive manufacturing (AM) has many advantages and became a valid manufacturing technique for polymers and metals in dentistry. However, its application for dental ceramics is still in process. Among dental ceramics, zirconia is becoming popular and widely used in dentistry mainly due to its outstanding properties. Although subtractive technology or milling is the state of art for manufacturing zirconia restorations but still has shortcomings. Utilizing AM in fabricating ceramics restorations is a new topic for many researchers and companies across the globe and a good understanding of AM of zirconia is essential for dental professional. Therefore, the aim of this narrative review is to illustrate different AM technologies available for processing zirconia and discus their advantages and future potential. A comprehensive literature review was completed to summarize different AM technologies that are available to fabricate zirconia and their clinical application is reported. The results show a promising outcome for utilizing AM of zirconia in restorative, implant and regenerative dentistry. However further improvements and validation is necessary to approve its clinical application. Full article
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