Special Issue "Structure and Properties of Fluoride-based Materials"

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352). This special issue belongs to the section "Crystalline Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Ralf Haiges

Loker Hydrocarbon Research Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-1661, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: inorganic chemistry; energetic materials; fluorine chemistry; NMR spectrocopy; Raman and infrared spectroscopy; X-ray crystallography

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fluorine-containing materials offer many advantages over non-fluorine-based materials in a variety of applications.

Fluorine is a rather special element and fluorine-based materials often possess unique properties. The small size and high electronegativity of the fluorine atom, combined with the small dissociation energy of F2 (155 kJ·mol-1) are the fundamental characteristics of fluorine chemistry. Most elements react readily with fluorine, often resulting in their oxidation to the highest known oxidation states. Because of the monovalence of fluorine, fluorides at the high oxidation-state limit are often near or at the coordination limit for that element. Fluoride glasses and many other solid-state fluoride materials contain low oxidation state polymeric metal fluorides with metal centres linked through highly stable m-fluoro bridges. Many fluorine-containing materials owe their special properties to the high electronegativity of the fluoride ligand. An example are fluoride glasses with ligand-to-metal charge-transfer bands shifted well into the UV region, making the important materials for lasers, optical fibres, waveguides and optical amplifiers.

Because of the ability of fluorine to form strong and stable chemical bonds with many other elements, fluoride-based materials have found a wide usage in photonics, electronics, optoelectronics, energy storage, lithium and sodium batteries, fuel cells, supercapacitors, and membranes.

The importance of fluoride-based materials is well established and the number of applications for these materials continues to increase. This Special Issue is intended to provide an overview of the current activity in the field.

Prof. Dr. Ralf Haiges
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Fluoride-based materials

  • Energy storage

  • Photonics

  • Optoelectronics

  • Electronics

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Synthesis and Characterization of Perovskite-Type [K1−xNax]MgF3 Mixed Phases via the Fluorolytic Sol-Gel Synthesis
Crystals 2018, 8(2), 66; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst8020066
Received: 18 January 2018 / Revised: 18 January 2018 / Accepted: 27 January 2018 / Published: 30 January 2018
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Abstract
The focus of this article is the synthesis of perovskite-type [K1−xNax]MgF3 mixed phases via the room-temperature fluorolytic sol-gel approach. Different molar ratios of K/Na were examined and analyzed by 19F MAS NMR and X-ray powder diffraction.
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The focus of this article is the synthesis of perovskite-type [K1−xNax]MgF3 mixed phases via the room-temperature fluorolytic sol-gel approach. Different molar ratios of K/Na were examined and analyzed by 19F MAS NMR and X-ray powder diffraction. Starting from pure KMgF3, a systematic substitution of potassium by sodium was evidenced when replacing K by Na. As long as the amount of sodium is less than 80% as compared to potassium, spectra just show [K4−xNaxF] environments in a [K1−xNax]MgF3 mixed phase but separate structures appear when the amount of sodium is further increased. Moreover, colloidal dispersions of nanoscaled KMgF3 particles were obtained, which were used to fabricate coatings on glass slides. Thin films showed antireflective behavior and high transmittance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Structure and Properties of Fluoride-based Materials)
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Open AccessArticle Synthesis and Characterization of Barium Hexafluoridoosmates
Crystals 2018, 8(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst8010011
Received: 27 November 2017 / Revised: 22 December 2017 / Accepted: 24 December 2017 / Published: 29 December 2017
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Abstract
Two barium hexafluoridoosmates, Ba(OsF6)2 and BaOsF6, were synthesized and were characterized for the first time using X-ray powder and single crystal diffraction, IR spectroscopy, as well as NMR spectroscopy in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride. Ba(OsF6)2 crystallizes
[...] Read more.
Two barium hexafluoridoosmates, Ba(OsF6)2 and BaOsF6, were synthesized and were characterized for the first time using X-ray powder and single crystal diffraction, IR spectroscopy, as well as NMR spectroscopy in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride. Ba(OsF6)2 crystallizes in the space group type P21/c with the cell parameters a = 6.4599(4), b = 10.7931(8), c = 14.7476(10) Å, β = 115.195(5)°, V = 930.42(12) Å3, Z = 4 at 293 K. BaOsF6 crystallizes in the space group type R 3 ¯ with the cell parameters a = 7.3286(10), c = 7.2658(15) Å, V = 337.95(12) Å3, Z = 3 at 100 K. Additionally, we have obtained the compounds Ba(OsF6)2∙3BrF3, Ba(OsF6)2∙HF, Ba(OsF6)2∙6H2O from the respective solvents, and Ba(OsF6)2. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Structure and Properties of Fluoride-based Materials)
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Open AccessArticle High-Pressure Reactivity of Kr and F2—Stabilization of Krypton in the +4 Oxidation State
Crystals 2017, 7(11), 329; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst7110329
Received: 29 September 2017 / Revised: 24 October 2017 / Accepted: 25 October 2017 / Published: 28 October 2017
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Abstract
Since the synthesis of the first krypton compound, several other Kr-bearing connections have been obtained. However, in all of them krypton adopts the +2 oxidation state, in contrast to xenon which forms numerous compounds with an oxidation state as high as +8. Motivated
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Since the synthesis of the first krypton compound, several other Kr-bearing connections have been obtained. However, in all of them krypton adopts the +2 oxidation state, in contrast to xenon which forms numerous compounds with an oxidation state as high as +8. Motivated by the possibility of thermodynamic stabilization of exotic compounds with the use of high pressure (exceeding 1 GPa = 10 kbar), we present here theoretical investigations into the chemistry of krypton and fluorine at such large compression. In particular we focus on krypton tetrafluoride, KrF4, a molecular crystal in which krypton forms short covalent bonds with neighboring fluorine atoms thus adopting the +4 oxidation state. We find that this hitherto unknown compound can be stabilized at pressures below 50 GPa. Our results indicate also that, at larger compressions, a multitude of other KrmFn fluorides should be stable, among them KrF which exhibits covalent Kr–Kr bonds. Our results set the stage for future high-pressure synthesis of novel krypton compounds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Structure and Properties of Fluoride-based Materials)
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