Special Issue "NQR of Polymorphic Crystals"

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352). This special issue belongs to the section "Crystal Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Tomaž Apih
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia
Interests: nuclear magnetic resonance; nuclear quadrupole resonance; fast field cycling relaxometry; active pharmaceutical ingredients; liquid crystals; hydrogen storage; quasicrystals; polymorphism

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The phenomenon of polymorphism is well known to profoundly effect the solid-state properties of crystalline solids. For example, the polymorphic forms of solid active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) often manifest striking differences in solubility and dissolution rate, which directly affect the biological action of drugs. From an economic standpoint, the production and intellectual property protection aspects of polymorphism may be equally important.

Nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectroscopy is sometimes considered an 'exotic' variant of NMR and is not used as widely as NMR. However, it is becoming more and more clear that especially in the field of crystalline polymorphism, there are advantages of NQR spectroscopy that can help solve many questions more easily than NMR. For example, NQR does not require an external magnetic field, so powder samples exhibit the same high spectral resolution with narrow lines as single crystals. Different polymorphic structures often exhibit minuscule shifts or splitting of NMR lines; in NQR, the resonance frequencies are directly defined by the crystalline structure and the shifts are much more pronounced and easily distinguished. The usefulness of NQR is nowadays further enhanced by DFT calculations that allow for the calculation of the electric field gradient, thus establishing a link between the structural arrangement and the corresponding NQR spectra.

This Special Issue, entitled “NQR of Polymorphic Crystals”, aims to collect original research papers and review articles on NQR studies on polymorphic crystals, not just in the sense of different crystalline forms of the same molecules, but also other related solid state forms, such as co-crystals, solvates, salts and amorphous forms.

Dr. Tomaž Apih
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Crystals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance
  • NQR
  • Electric Field Gradient
  • EFG
  • Polymorph
  • Cocrystal

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
The Predictive Power of Different Projector-Augmented Wave Potentials for Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance
Crystals 2019, 9(10), 507; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst9100507 - 28 Sep 2019
Abstract
The projector-augmented wave (PAW) method is used to calculate electric field gradients (EFG) for various PAW potentials. A variety of crystals containing reactive nonmetal, simple metal, and transition elements, are evaluated in order to determine the predictive ability of the PAW method for [...] Read more.
The projector-augmented wave (PAW) method is used to calculate electric field gradients (EFG) for various PAW potentials. A variety of crystals containing reactive nonmetal, simple metal, and transition elements, are evaluated in order to determine the predictive ability of the PAW method for the determination of nuclear quadrupole resonance frequencies in previously unstudied materials and their polymorphs. All results were compared to experimental results and, where possible, to previous density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The EFG at the 14N site of NaNO2 is calculated by DFT for the first time. The reactive nonmetal elements were not very sensitive to the variation in PAW potentials, and calculations were quite close to experimental values. For the other elements, the various PAW potentials led to a clear spread in EFG values, with no one universal potential emerging. Within the spread, there was agreement with other ab initio models. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NQR of Polymorphic Crystals)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Tris(2-Methoxyphenyl)Bismuthine Polymorphism Characterized by Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy
Crystals 2019, 9(9), 446; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst9090446 - 28 Aug 2019
Abstract
Based on the previous identification of metastable polymorphs in crystalline triphenylbismuth by nuclear quadrupole resonance spectroscopy (NQRS), the potential formation of similar phases was studied in Tris(2-Methoxyphenyl)Bismuthine. To this end, commercial samples with known NQRS properties were molten and re-crystallized at different speeds [...] Read more.
Based on the previous identification of metastable polymorphs in crystalline triphenylbismuth by nuclear quadrupole resonance spectroscopy (NQRS), the potential formation of similar phases was studied in Tris(2-Methoxyphenyl)Bismuthine. To this end, commercial samples with known NQRS properties were molten and re-crystallized at different speeds (shock freezing in different coolants versus slow cooling inside of a heater). In all recrystallization products we have identified a new crystal phase which has not been observed after synthesis from a solution. The new crystallographic structure has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The newly isolated polymorph crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/c with only one molecule in the asymmetric unit and consequently only one 5/2-7/2 transition is observed at 88.75 MHz at 310 K. In contrast, the two transitions at 89.38 and 89.29 MHz for the well-known trigonal polymorph originate from two crystallographically distinct molecules of Tris(2-methoxy-Phenyl)Bismuthine in the asymmetric unit. Additional relaxometric NQRS shows distinctly different T2 relaxation times for the new polymorph when compared to the original samples. Additional phase transitions could not be observed during temperature sweeps between 153 K and 323 K. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NQR of Polymorphic Crystals)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy: Tautomerism and Structure of Functional Azoles
Crystals 2019, 9(7), 366; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst9070366 - 17 Jul 2019
Abstract
The Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance spectroscopy data of functionalized azoles (imidazoles, triazoles and corresponding benzazoles) are reviewed and critically discussed. The possibility of studying the tautomerism of azoles by the NQR method is considered. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NQR of Polymorphic Crystals)
Show Figures

Scheme 1

Back to TopTop