Special Issue "Coatings for Corrosion Mitigation"

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2017).

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Niteen Jadhav E-Mail
Product Development Chemist, The Valspar Corporation, Minneapolis, MN 55415, USA
Interests: corrosion; coatings; electrochemistry; conducting polymers; nanocomposites; nanomaterials; radiation curable coatings; wood coatings; coil coatings
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Andrew J. Vreugdenhil E-Mail
Department of Chemistry, Trent University, 1600 West Bank Drive, Peterborough, ON K9J 7B8, Canada
Interests: inorganic and materials chemistry; sol-gel; nanoparticles; hybrid materials; corrosion suppression

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Corrosion is a global issue, which challenges a wide range of industrial sectors. Durable and active coatings are some of the most frequently used and effective methods for mitigating corrosion. We cordially invite you to submit your coatings research work to this Special Issue on “Coatings for Corrosion Mitigation”. With this Special Issue, we hope to present an array of cutting edge coatings research for corrosion protection to a broad audience interested in conservation and sustainability. 

In particular, the topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Organic and Inorganic coatings for corrosion protection
  • Corrosion inhibitors
  • Smart coatings for corrosion protection (functional coatings and self-healing coating)
  • Electrochemical test methods for corrosion evaluation
  • Sol-Gel coatings

Dr. Niteen Jadhav
Prof. Andrew J. Vreugdenhil
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (10 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Electrochemical Behavior of Bilayer Thermal-Spray Coatings in Low-Temperature Corrosion Protection
Coatings 2017, 7(10), 162; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings7100162 - 30 Sep 2017
Cited by 3
Abstract
Cr3C2-NiCr coatings are greatly used to protect critical components in corrosive environments and to extend their lifetime and/or improve functional performance. However, the pores formed during spraying restrict the coating’s applicability area for many corrosion protection applications. To overcome [...] Read more.
Cr3C2-NiCr coatings are greatly used to protect critical components in corrosive environments and to extend their lifetime and/or improve functional performance. However, the pores formed during spraying restrict the coating’s applicability area for many corrosion protection applications. To overcome this technical challenge, bilayer coatings have been developed, in which an additional layer (the so-called “intermediate layer”) is deposited on the substrate before spraying the Cr3C2-NiCr coating (the so-called “top layer”). The corrosion behavior of the bilayer coating depends on the composition and microstructure of each layer. In the present work, different single-layer coatings (i.e., Cr3C2-NiCr, Fe- and Ni-based coatings) were initially sprayed by a high-velocity air fuel (HVAF) process. Microstructure analysis, as well as electrochemical tests, for example, open-circuit potential (OCP) and polarization tests, were performed. The potential difference (ΔE) had a great influence on galvanic corrosion between the top and intermediate layers, and thus, the coatings were ranked based on the OCP values (from high to low) as follows: NiCoCrAlY > NiCr > Cr3C2-NiCr > NiAl > Fe-based coatings (alloyed with Cr) > pure Ni. The Ni-based coatings were chosen to be further used as intermediate layers with the Cr3C2-NiCr top layer due to their capabilities to show high OCP. The corrosion resistance (Rp) of the bilayer coatings was ranked (from high to low) as follows: NiCoCrAlY/Cr3C2-NiCr > NiCr/Cr3C2-NiCr > NiAl/Cr3C2-NiCr > Ni/Cr3C2-NiCr. It was shown that splat boundaries and interconnected pores are detrimental for corrosion resistance, however, a sufficient reservoir of protective scale-forming elements (such as Cr or/and Al) in the intermediate layer can significantly improve the corrosion resistance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coatings for Corrosion Mitigation)
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Open AccessArticle
Biodegradable Mg/HA/TiO2 Nanocomposites Coated with MgO and Si/MgO for Orthopedic Applications: A Study on the Corrosion, Surface Characterization, and Biocompatability
Coatings 2017, 7(10), 154; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings7100154 - 26 Sep 2017
Cited by 6
Abstract
In the field of orthopedics, magnesium (Mg) and magnesium-based composites as biodegradable materials have attracted fundamental research. However, the medical applications of magnesium implants have been restricted owing to their poor corrosion resistance, especially in the physiological environment. To improve the corrosion resistance [...] Read more.
In the field of orthopedics, magnesium (Mg) and magnesium-based composites as biodegradable materials have attracted fundamental research. However, the medical applications of magnesium implants have been restricted owing to their poor corrosion resistance, especially in the physiological environment. To improve the corrosion resistance of Mg/HA/TiO2 nanocomposites, monolayer MgO and double-layer Si/MgO coatings were fabricated layer-by-layer on the surface of a nanocomposite using a powder metallurgy route. Then, coating thickness, surface morphology, and chemical composition were determined, and the corrosion behavior of the uncoated and coated samples was evaluated. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) micrographs show that an inner MgO layer with a porous microstructure and thickness of around 34 μm is generated on the Mg/HA/TiO2 nanocomposite substrate, and that the outer Si layer thickness is obtained at around 23 μm for the double-layered coated sample. Electrochemical corrosion tests and immersion corrosion tests were carried out on the uncoated and coated samples and the Si/MgO-coated nanocomposite showed significantly improved corrosion resistance compared with uncoated Mg/HA/TiO2 in simulated body fluid (SBF). Corrosion products comprising Mg(OH)2, HA, Ca3(PO4)2, and amorphous CaP components were precipitated on the immersed samples. Improved cytocompatibility was observed with coating as the cell viability ranged from 73% in uncoated to 88% for Si/MgO-coated Mg/HA/TiO2 nanocomposite after nine days of incubation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coatings for Corrosion Mitigation)
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Open AccessArticle
Nanoscale Characterization of Glass Flake Filled Vinyl Ester Anti-Corrosion Coatings
Coatings 2017, 7(8), 116; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings7080116 - 04 Aug 2017
Cited by 3
Abstract
Vinyl ester is a thermoset matrix resin that is widely used in the coating industry. The presence of glass flakes further enhances the anti-corrosion performance of this coating. This paper reports the nanoscaled characterization of glass flake filled vinyl ester anti-corrosion coatings on [...] Read more.
Vinyl ester is a thermoset matrix resin that is widely used in the coating industry. The presence of glass flakes further enhances the anti-corrosion performance of this coating. This paper reports the nanoscaled characterization of glass flake filled vinyl ester anti-corrosion coatings on mild steel. Bond strength properties of one uncoated and four coated samples with different thicknesses (300, 600, 900 and 1200 μm) were studied using nanoscratch technique and ASTM Standard Test. It was found that the bond strength of coating with thickness 900 μm was the highest. The frequency distributions of elastic modulus on coating with 900 μm thickness determined using nanoindentation indicated that only 20–25% of the coating is composed of glass flakes and the balance is vinyl ester matrix. The critical depth at which the material is subject to failure due to external load and abrasion, was found to be around 100 nm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coatings for Corrosion Mitigation)
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Open AccessArticle
Investigation on the Cathodic Protection Effect of Low Pressure Cold Sprayed AlZn Coating in Seawater via Numerical Simulation
Coatings 2017, 7(7), 93; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings7070093 - 04 Jul 2017
Cited by 1
Abstract
Cold spray can deposit a composite coating simply by spraying mechanically-mixed Al and Zn powders, while no quantitative data has been reported on the anti-corrosion performance of different composite cold-sprayed coatings. In the present work, the finite element method was used to estimate [...] Read more.
Cold spray can deposit a composite coating simply by spraying mechanically-mixed Al and Zn powders, while no quantitative data has been reported on the anti-corrosion performance of different composite cold-sprayed coatings. In the present work, the finite element method was used to estimate the cathodic protection effect by simulating the potential distribution on a damaged cold-sprayed AlZn coating on Q235 steel. The results indicate that AlZn coating can only provide a limiting cathodic protection for substrate, because it can only polarize a very narrow zone negative to −0.78 V (vs. SCE, saturated calomel electrode). The remaining area of the steel substrate still has a very high residual corrosion rate. Computational methods can be used to predict the corrosion rate of AlZn coating, and the simulation results were validated by the results of a weight loss experiment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coatings for Corrosion Mitigation)
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Open AccessArticle
Silica-Based Sol-Gel Coating on Magnesium Alloy with Green Inhibitors
Coatings 2017, 7(7), 86; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings7070086 - 22 Jun 2017
Cited by 4
Abstract
In this work, the performances of several natural organic inhibitors were investigated in a sol-gel system (applied on the magnesium alloy Mg AZ31B substrate). The inhibitors were quinaldic acid (QDA), betaine (BET), dopamine hydrochloride (DOP), and diazolidinyl urea (DZU). Thin, uniform, and defect-free [...] Read more.
In this work, the performances of several natural organic inhibitors were investigated in a sol-gel system (applied on the magnesium alloy Mg AZ31B substrate). The inhibitors were quinaldic acid (QDA), betaine (BET), dopamine hydrochloride (DOP), and diazolidinyl urea (DZU). Thin, uniform, and defect-free sol-gel coatings were prepared with and without organic inhibitors, and applied on the Mg AZ31B substrate. SEM and EDX were performed to analyze the coating surface properties, the adhesion to the substrate, and the thickness. Electrochemical measurements, including electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and anodic potentiodynamic polarization scan (PDS), were performed on the coated samples to characterize the coatings’ protective properties. Also, hydrogen evolution measurement—an easy method to measure magnesium corrosion—was performed in order to characterize the efficiency of coating protection on the magnesium substrate. Moreover, scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET) measurements were performed to examine the efficiency of the coatings loaded with inhibitors in preventing and containing corrosion events in defect areas. From the testing results it was observed that the formulated sol-gel coatings provided a good barrier to the substrate, affording some protection even without the presence of inhibitors. Finally, when the inhibitors’ performances were compared, the QDA-doped sol-gel was able to contain the corrosion event at the defect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coatings for Corrosion Mitigation)
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Open AccessArticle
The Effect of Temperature and Local pH on Calcareous Deposit Formation in Damaged Thermal Spray Aluminum (TSA) Coatings and Its Implication on Corrosion Mitigation of Offshore Steel Structures
Coatings 2017, 7(4), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings7040052 - 11 Apr 2017
Cited by 4
Abstract
This paper is based on experimental data and provides better understanding of the mechanism of calcareous deposit formation on cathodically polarized steel surfaces exposed to synthetic seawater at 30 °C and 60 °C. The study comprises measurement of the interfacial pH of thermally [...] Read more.
This paper is based on experimental data and provides better understanding of the mechanism of calcareous deposit formation on cathodically polarized steel surfaces exposed to synthetic seawater at 30 °C and 60 °C. The study comprises measurement of the interfacial pH of thermally sprayed aluminum (TSA) coated steel samples with and without a holiday (exposing 20% of the surface area). Tests were conducted at the corrosion potential for up to 350 h. It was experimentally determined that the local pH adjacent to the steel surface in the holiday region reached a maximum of 10.19 and 9.54 at 30 °C and 60 °C, respectively, before stabilizing at about 8.8 and 7.9 at the two temperatures. The interfacial pH on the TSA coating at 30 °C was initially 7.74 dropping to 4.76 in 220 h, while at 60 °C it increased from pH 6.41 to the range pH 7.0–8.5. The interfacial pH governed the deposition of brucite and aragonite from seawater on the steel surface cathodically polarized by the TSA. This mechanism is likely to affect the performance of TSA-coated offshore steel structures, especially when damaged in service. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coatings for Corrosion Mitigation)
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Open AccessArticle
High-Temperature Corrosion of AlCrSiN Film in Ar-1%SO2 Gas
Coatings 2017, 7(3), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings7030044 - 13 Mar 2017
Cited by 3
Abstract
AlCrSiN film with a composition of 29.1Al-17.1Cr-2.1Si-51.7N in at. % was deposited on a steel substrate by cathodic arc ion plating at a thickness of 1.8 μm. It consisted of nanocrystalline hcp-AlN and fcc-CrN, where a small amount of Si was [...] Read more.
AlCrSiN film with a composition of 29.1Al-17.1Cr-2.1Si-51.7N in at. % was deposited on a steel substrate by cathodic arc ion plating at a thickness of 1.8 μm. It consisted of nanocrystalline hcp-AlN and fcc-CrN, where a small amount of Si was dissolved. Corrosion tests were carried out at 800 °C for 5–200 h in Ar-1%SO2 gas. The major corrosion reaction was oxidation owing to the high oxygen affinity of Al and Cr in the film. The formed oxide scale consisted primarily of (Al,Cr)2O3, within which Fe, Si, and S were dissolved. Even after corrosion for 200 h, the thickness of the scale was about 0.7–1.2 μm, indicating that the film had good corrosion resistance in the SO2-containing atmosphere. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coatings for Corrosion Mitigation)
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Open AccessArticle
Pitted Corrosion Detection of Thermal Sprayed Metallic Coatings Using Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors
Coatings 2017, 7(3), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings7030035 - 24 Feb 2017
Cited by 4
Abstract
Metallic coatings using thermal spraying techniques are widely applied to structural steels to protect infrastructure against corrosion and improve durability of the associated structures for longer service life. The thermal sprayed metallic coatings consisting of various metals, although have higher corrosion resistance, will [...] Read more.
Metallic coatings using thermal spraying techniques are widely applied to structural steels to protect infrastructure against corrosion and improve durability of the associated structures for longer service life. The thermal sprayed metallic coatings consisting of various metals, although have higher corrosion resistance, will still corrode in a long run and may also subject to corrosion induced damages such as cracks. Corrosion and the induced damages on the metallic coatings will reduce the effectiveness of the coatings for protection of the structures. Timely repair on these damaged metallic coatings will significantly improve the reliability of protected structures again deterioration. In this paper, an inline detection system for corrosion and crack detection was developed using fiber Bragg (FBG) grating sensors. Experimental results from laboratory accelerated corrosion tests showed that the developed sensing system can quantitatively detect corrosion rate of the coating, corrosion propagations, and cracks initialized in the metallic coating in real time. The developed system can be used for real-time corrosion detection of coated metal structures in field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coatings for Corrosion Mitigation)
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Open AccessArticle
Effects of Rare Earth Elements on Properties of Ni-Base Superalloy Powders and Coatings
Coatings 2017, 7(2), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings7020030 - 16 Feb 2017
Cited by 4
Abstract
NiCrMoY alloy powders were prepared using inert gas atomization by incorporation of rare earth elements, such as Mo, Nb, and Y into Ni60A powders, the coatings were sprayed by oxy-acetylene flame spray and then remelted with high-frequency induction. The morphologies, hollow particle ratio, [...] Read more.
NiCrMoY alloy powders were prepared using inert gas atomization by incorporation of rare earth elements, such as Mo, Nb, and Y into Ni60A powders, the coatings were sprayed by oxy-acetylene flame spray and then remelted with high-frequency induction. The morphologies, hollow particle ratio, particle-size distribution, apparent density, flowability, and the oxygen content of the NiCrMoY alloy powders were investigated, and the microstructure and hardness of the coatings were evaluated by optical microscopy (OM). Due to incorporation of the rare earth elements of Mo, Nb, or Y, the majority of the NiCrMoY alloy particles are near-spherical, the minority of which have small satellites, the surface of the particles is smoother and hollow particles are fewer, the particles exhibit larger apparent density and lower flowability than those of particles without incorporation, i.e., Ni60A powders, and particle-size distribution exhibits a single peak and fits normal distribution. The microstructure of the NiCrMoY alloy coatings exhibits finer structure and Rockwell hardness HRC of 60–63 in which the bulk- and needle-like hard phases are formed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coatings for Corrosion Mitigation)
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Open AccessArticle
Investigation of the Corrosion Behavior of Electroless Ni-P Coating in Flue Gas Condensate
Coatings 2017, 7(1), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings7010016 - 19 Jan 2017
Cited by 3
Abstract
The corrosion behavior of Ni-P coating deposited on 3003 aluminum alloy in flue gas condensate was investigated by electrochemical approaches. The results indicated that nitrite acted as a corrosion inhibitor. The inhibiting effect of nitrite was reduced in solutions containing sulfate or nitrate. [...] Read more.
The corrosion behavior of Ni-P coating deposited on 3003 aluminum alloy in flue gas condensate was investigated by electrochemical approaches. The results indicated that nitrite acted as a corrosion inhibitor. The inhibiting effect of nitrite was reduced in solutions containing sulfate or nitrate. Chloride and sulfate accelerated the corrosion of Ni-P coatings greatly. This can provide important information for the researchers to develop special Ni-P coatings with high corrosion resistance in the flue gas condensate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coatings for Corrosion Mitigation)
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