Special Issue "Advances in Chemical Imaging and its Applications"

A special issue of Chemosensors (ISSN 2227-9040).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Brian Cullum

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: plasmonics; surface enhanced raman scattering; nanosensing; nano-imaging; chemical imaging; photoacoustic sensing; biophotonics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the past several decades, chemical imaging has seen a dramatic increase in its application to numerous disciplines, driven largely by its ability to provide both chemical specific identification as well as the spatial distribution of the various components. This ability to spatially monitor the distribution and motion of specific chemical constituents within or on a sample can allow for site-specific treatment and/or monitoring and more recently has been exploited to correlate unknown relationships between different constituents. The inherent information associated with chemical imaging as well as recent technological advances that have improved both the spatial and temporal resolution of such analyses have resulted in the rapid and growing exploitation of chemical imaging for many different applications, including: food safety, space monitoring, biomedical diagnostics, forensic analysis, pharmaceutical monitoring, cellular analyses, defense and many more.  

This Special Issue on “Advances in Chemical Imaging and its Applications” will provide an overview and critical assessment of the latest developments and advances in chemical imaging technologies (spectroscopic, electrochemical and mass spectrometric) and their application to various disciplines ranging from space monitoring to super-resolution chemical imaging of cellular/sub-cellular environments. Emphasis will be placed on both the new technological advances in chemical imaging (e.g., super-resolution imaging, etc.) as well as novel applications and implementation.

Prof. Brian Cullum
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Chemosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview Advances and Perspectives in Chemical Imaging in Cellular Environments Using Electrochemical Methods
Chemosensors 2018, 6(2), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors6020024
Received: 23 April 2018 / Revised: 22 May 2018 / Accepted: 23 May 2018 / Published: 29 May 2018
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Abstract
This review discusses a broad range of recent advances (2013–2017) in chemical imaging using electrochemical methods, with a particular focus on techniques that have been applied to study cellular processes, or techniques that show promise for use in this field in the future.
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This review discusses a broad range of recent advances (2013–2017) in chemical imaging using electrochemical methods, with a particular focus on techniques that have been applied to study cellular processes, or techniques that show promise for use in this field in the future. Non-scanning techniques such as microelectrode arrays (MEAs) offer high time-resolution (<10 ms) imaging; however, at reduced spatial resolution. In contrast, scanning electrochemical probe microscopies (SEPMs) offer higher spatial resolution (as low as a few nm per pixel) imaging, with images collected typically over many minutes. Recent significant research efforts to improve the spatial resolution of SEPMs using nanoscale probes and to improve the temporal resolution using fast scanning have resulted in movie (multiple frame) imaging with frame rates as low as a few seconds per image. Many SEPM techniques lack chemical specificity or have poor selectivity (defined by the choice of applied potential for redox-active species). This can be improved using multifunctional probes, ion-selective electrodes and tip-integrated biosensors, although additional effort may be required to preserve sensor performance after miniaturization of these probes. We discuss advances to the field of electrochemical imaging, and technological developments which are anticipated to extend the range of processes that can be studied. This includes imaging cellular processes with increased sensor selectivity and at much improved spatiotemporal resolution than has been previously customary. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Chemical Imaging and its Applications)
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Spectroscopic Chemical Sensing and Imaging: From Plants to Animals and Humans
Chemosensors 2018, 6(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors6010011
Received: 15 January 2018 / Revised: 16 February 2018 / Accepted: 20 February 2018 / Published: 26 February 2018
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Abstract
Chemical sensing and imaging technologies are of great importance in medical diagnostics and environmental sensing due to their ability to detect and localize chemical targets and provide valuable information in real-time. Biophotonic techniques are the most promising for in vivo applications due to
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Chemical sensing and imaging technologies are of great importance in medical diagnostics and environmental sensing due to their ability to detect and localize chemical targets and provide valuable information in real-time. Biophotonic techniques are the most promising for in vivo applications due to their minimal invasivity. Our laboratory has introduced various biophotonics-based technologies for chemical sensing and imaging for biochemical sensing, medical diagnostics, and fundamental research. Over the years, we have developed a wide variety of fluorescence and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based technologies for the detection of biomarkers for cancer and other diseases. This paper provides an overview of the research on chemical and biological sensors developed in our laboratory, highlighting our work on in vivo imaging and sensing, including minimally invasive detection of endogenous fluorophores associated with malignant tissue, SERS-tag localization of cancer cells and tissues, and SERS-based detection of nucleic acid biotargets and its feasibility for in vivo applications. This manuscript also presents new development on the use of Raman imaging of SERS-labeled nanoprobes incubated in leaves for use in biofuel research, laying the foundation for studies on functional imaging of nucleic acid biomarkers in plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Chemical Imaging and its Applications)
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Open AccessReview Raman and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering for Biofilm Characterization
Received: 7 December 2017 / Revised: 11 January 2018 / Accepted: 16 January 2018 / Published: 19 January 2018
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Abstract
Biofilms are a communal way of living for microorganisms in which microorganism cells are surrounded by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Most microorganisms can live in biofilm form. Since microorganisms are everywhere, understanding biofilm structure and composition is crucial for making the world a
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Biofilms are a communal way of living for microorganisms in which microorganism cells are surrounded by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Most microorganisms can live in biofilm form. Since microorganisms are everywhere, understanding biofilm structure and composition is crucial for making the world a better place to live, not only for humans but also for other living creatures. Raman spectroscopy is a nondestructive technique and provides fingerprint information about an analyte of interest. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy is a form of this technique and provides enhanced scattering of the analyte that is in close vicinity of a nanostructured noble metal surface such as silver or gold. In this review, the applications of both techniques and their combination with other biofilm analysis techniques for characterization of composition and structure of biofilms are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Chemical Imaging and its Applications)
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Infra-Red Plasmonic Sensors
Received: 30 November 2017 / Revised: 9 January 2018 / Accepted: 10 January 2018 / Published: 16 January 2018
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Abstract
Plasmonic sensors exploiting the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of noble metal nanoparticles are common in the visual spectrum. However, bio-sensors near the infra-red (NIR) windows (600–900 nm and 1000–1400 nm) are of interest, as in these regions the absorption coefficients of water,
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Plasmonic sensors exploiting the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of noble metal nanoparticles are common in the visual spectrum. However, bio-sensors near the infra-red (NIR) windows (600–900 nm and 1000–1400 nm) are of interest, as in these regions the absorption coefficients of water, melanin deoxyglobin, and hemoglobin are all low. The first part of this paper reviews the work that has been undertaken using gold (Au) and silver (Ag) particles in metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF) in the NIR. Despite this success, there are limitations, as there is only a narrow band in the visual and NIR where losses are low for traditional plasmonic materials. Further, noble metals are not compatible with standard silicon manufacturing processes, making it challenging to produce on-chip integrated plasmonic sensors with Au or Ag. Therefore, it is desirable to use different materials for plasmonic chemical and biological sensing, that are foundry-compatible with silicon (Si) and germanium (Ge). One material that has received significant attention is highly-doped Ge, which starts to exhibit metallic properties at a wavelength as short as 6 μm. This is discussed in the second part of the paper and the results of recent analysis are included. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Chemical Imaging and its Applications)
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