Catalytic CO Oxidation and Preferential CO Oxidation (PROX) II

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Catalysis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2024) | Viewed by 1761

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Solid State Chemistry and Catalysis, Institute for Inorganic Chemistry, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Max-Eyth-Straße 2, 24118 Kiel, Germany
Interests: heterogeneous catalysis; operando characterization; spectroscopy; colloidal chemistry; model catalysts; structure-activity correlations; oxidation reactions; surface analysis
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Guest Editor
Institute of Materials Chemistry, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria
Interests: catalysis; reaction mechanisms; operando spectroscopy; structure-performance relationships; environmental catalysis; C1 chemistry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will collect recent advances and insights into CO oxidation and PROX. Catalytic CO oxidation is a widely studied reaction, because of its great practical importance in automotive exhaust gas control and in H2 purification for proton exchange membrane fuel cells. On top of that, CO oxidation is a simple but very useful model reaction for investigating active sites and reaction pathways in various catalyst materials. Of particular interest are the development of three-way-catalysts with low ignition temperatures to reduce automotive emissions during the engine cold start and the improvement of catalysts stability against sintering under the high operating temperatures of the exhaust gas, especially in the presence of moisture. The preferential CO oxidation (PROX) is of interest as H2 purification technology to obtain CO-free H2 for hydrogen-powered fuel cells, particularly for small-scale portable and on-board power units. PROX catalysts require high activity, selectivity, and stability.

Topics of interest include metal and metal oxide catalysts, the role of metal/oxide interfaces, mechanistic studies, investigations of the nature of active sites, structure-activity-correlations, in situ/operando spectroscopy, the development and synthesis of new materials, model studies and DFT modeling. Contributions exploring other related topics are also welcome.

Dr. Sharif Najafishirtari
Dr. Karin Föttinger
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • CO oxidation
  • H2 oxidation
  • O2 activation
  • reaction mechanism and kinetics
  • active sites
  • stability and deactivation
  • in situ and operando catalyst characterization
  • structure-activity-correlations

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

13 pages, 8611 KiB  
Article
Platinum on High-Entropy Aluminate Spinels as Thermally Stable CO Oxidation Catalysts
by Christopher Riley, Andrew De La Riva, Nichole Valdez, Ryan Alcala, Ping Lu, Richard Grant, Angelica Benavidez, Mark Rodriguez, Abhaya Datye and Stanley S. Chou
Catalysts 2024, 14(3), 211; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal14030211 - 21 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Thermal degradation is a leading cause of automotive catalyst deactivation. Because high-entropy oxides are uniquely stabilized at high temperatures via an increase in configurational entropy, these materials may offer new mechanisms for preventing the thermal deactivation of precious metal catalysts. In this work, [...] Read more.
Thermal degradation is a leading cause of automotive catalyst deactivation. Because high-entropy oxides are uniquely stabilized at high temperatures via an increase in configurational entropy, these materials may offer new mechanisms for preventing the thermal deactivation of precious metal catalysts. In this work, we evaluated platinum loaded on simple and high-entropy aluminate spinels (MAl2O4, where M = Co, Cu, Mg, Ni, or mixtures thereof) in carbon monoxide oxidation before and after aging at 800 °C. Pt supported on all simple spinels showed significant deactivation after thermal aging compared to the fresh samples, with T90 increasing by at least 60 °C. However, Pt on high-entropy spinels had nearly the same or better activity after aging, with T90 increasing by only 6 °C at most. During aging and reduction, copper exsolved from the spinel supports and alloyed with platinum. This interaction promoted low temperature oxidation activity, presumably through weakened CO binding, but did not prevent deactivation. On the other hand, Co, Mg, and Ni constituents promoted stronger CO bonding, as evidenced by apparent negative order kinetics and poor activity at low temperatures. High-entropy spinels, containing a variety of active metals, displayed synergetic reactant adsorption capacity and cooperative effects with supported platinum particles, which collectively prevented thermal deactivation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Catalytic CO Oxidation and Preferential CO Oxidation (PROX) II)
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