Special Issue "Catalysts in 1D and 2D Materials—Their Role in Synthesis, Properties and Applications"

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 March 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Thurid Gspann
Website
Guest Editor
Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany
Interests: catalysis; CVD synthesis; process engineering; nanomaterials; characterization
Dr. Adarsh Kaniyoor
Website
Guest Editor
University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
Interests: catalysis; CVD; nanomaterials; material characterization; finite element modelling; statistical analyses; photovoltaics; sensors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the last two decades, the research on 1D and 2D materials has expanded rapidly. It is up to date led by carbon nanotube and graphene research but complimented by other hexagonal lattice materials such as boron nitride, transition metal dichalcogenides and many more. All of these materials are synthesized via processes that crucially require catalysts to enable and control production, and enhance production rates. The size and composition of catalysts, treatment or functionalization done, their production and delivery methods etc. determine the reaction kinetics and direction. The final product may either still retain catalyst particles or be purified thereof – in either case, the resultant material’s properties will be affected significantly.  In this special issue, the scope is on ‘Catalysts in 1D and 2D materials – Their role in synthesis, properties and applications’. The issue will cover the whole bandwidth from the catalysts’ role for synthesis – the effects of different catalyst sources, non-iron catalysts, control of catalyst size, on-substrate or substrate-free catalyst systems, pre-synthesis or in-situ catalyst production, up to their role as residue in the final material – their effects on the material’s physical properties, characterization methods, and processes for their removal. Computational studies on catalysts within the above scope are also welcome.

Dr. Thurid Gspann
Dr. Adarsh Kaniyoor
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Catalysts is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • 1D and 2D materials
  • Carbon nanotubes / CNTs
  • Graphene
  • Boron Nitride / BN
  • TMDC
  • Synthesis
  • Catalyst materials
  • Catalyst production
  • Characterization
  • Removal processes
  • Computation

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Flow Simulations Including Iron Nanoparticle Nucleation, Growth and Evaporation for Floating Catalyst CNT Production
Catalysts 2020, 10(12), 1383; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal10121383 - 27 Nov 2020
Abstract
We use a computational fluid dynamics model coupled with a particle dynamics model to simulate how catalyst nanoparticles nucleate, grow and evaporate over the length of a floating catalyst reactor. We focus on the influence of the flowrate in the reactor and the [...] Read more.
We use a computational fluid dynamics model coupled with a particle dynamics model to simulate how catalyst nanoparticles nucleate, grow and evaporate over the length of a floating catalyst reactor. We focus on the influence of the flowrate in the reactor and the ferrocene mass fraction on the production of the catalyst nanoparticles. In the downstream region of the reactor, where the majority of CNT growth occurs, we find that, as either the flowrate or the ferrocene mass fraction increases, the particle mass fraction profile changes, with the mass fraction peak shifting away from the centreline. This displacement away from the centreline of the mass fraction peak may explain why the CNTs form a hollow, sock-like, aerogel at the downstream end of the reactor. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Precise Catalyst Production for Carbon Nanotube Synthesis with Targeted Structure Enrichment
Catalysts 2020, 10(9), 1087; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal10091087 - 19 Sep 2020
Abstract
The direct growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a narrow distribution of diameter or chirality remains elusive despite significant benefits in properties and applications. Nanoparticle catalysts are vital for SWCNT synthesis, but how to precisely manipulate their chemistry, size, concentration, and deposition [...] Read more.
The direct growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a narrow distribution of diameter or chirality remains elusive despite significant benefits in properties and applications. Nanoparticle catalysts are vital for SWCNT synthesis, but how to precisely manipulate their chemistry, size, concentration, and deposition remains difficult, especially within a continuous production process from the gas phase. Here, we demonstrate the preparation of W6Co7 alloyed nanoparticle catalysts with precisely tunable stoichiometry using electrospray, which remain solid state during SWCNT growth. We also demonstrate continuous production of liquid iron nanoparticles with in-line size selection. With the precise size manipulation of catalysts in the range of 1–5 nm, and a nearly monodisperse distribution (σg < 1.2), an excellent size selection of SWCNTs can be achieved. All of the presented techniques show great potential to facilitate the realization of single-chirality SWCNTs production. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Enhancement of CNT Textiles through Bundle Alignment and Catalyst Sweating
Authors: Thurid S. Gspann1; Adarsh Kaniyoor1; Wei Tan2; Philipp Kloza1; Jenny Mizen1; John Bulmer3; James A. Elliott1
Affiliation: 1 Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, CB3 0FS, UK 2 The School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary University of London, E1 4NS, UK 3 Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 1PZ, UK
Abstract: Photonic post-processing of FC-CVD spun CNT textiles results in selective sorting of the carbon nanotubes present. Defective, thermally non-conductive, or unconnected CNTs burn, leaving behind a highly crystalline, highly conductive network. However, the anticipated improvement in the Raman G/D ratio does not show for all samples. Some of the best-aligned as-spun samples, showing the highest tensile strength and conductivity, burn before G/D improvement is achieved. Aside from the improvement in G/D, which this paper show to be sample composition dependent, there are fundamental side-effects which are observed for all samples: Pulse irradiation – not only by laser but also white light camera flashes – , as well as thermal processes such as Joule heating e.g., leads to a major improvement in alignment, as well as sweating of catalyst nanoparticles, resulting in molten micron-sized catalyst beads on the textile surface which can facilitate their removal afterwards. However, the behaviour of the catalyst beads is also material dependent. Whether the textile is spun under ‘low’ or ‘high H2 flow rate’ [1] determines whether catalyst bead ablation, or conversely, CNT destruction occurs.

Back to TopTop