Advanced Catalytic Technology for Environmental Pollution Control

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Catalysis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 March 2024) | Viewed by 2339

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Innovation & Application, National Engineering Research Central for Marine Aquaculture, Zhejiang Ocean University, Zhoushan, China
Interests: environmental catalysis; photocatalysis; photodegradation of organic pollutant; water splitting; CO2 reduction; organocatalysis
Institute of Innovation & Application, National Engineering Research Central for Marine Aquaculture, Zhejiang Ocean University, Zhoushan, China
Interests: environmental catalysis; catalytic synthesis of fine chemicals; hydrogen production

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Advanced catalytic technology for environmental pollution control refers to the use of advanced catalytic systems to reduce and eliminate environmental pollution. This technology involves the development and application of innovative catalytic materials and processes to treat polluted air, water, and soil. This technology, including heterogeneous catalysis, homogeneous catalysis, and photocatalysis, have been extensively studied and applied in various fields. Advanced catalytic technology has been applied to control air pollution by reducing the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), nitrogen oxides (NOx), greenhouse gases, and particulate matter (PM). In water treatment, catalytic systems have been developed for the removal of organic pollutants, heavy metals, and nutrients. Advanced catalytic technology has also been used to remediate contaminated soil and groundwater.

The development of advanced catalytic technology has been driven by the need for efficient and sustainable solutions to environmental pollution. This technology has the potential to provide cost-effective and eco-friendly solutions to environmental challenges. However, challenges still exist in the development of catalytic materials with inexpensiveness, high activity, selectivity, and stability.

Overall, advanced catalytic technology has shown great promise for environmental pollution control, and ongoing research and development are expected to yield even more effective and sustainable catalytic systems in the future.

The scope of interests

1) Novel catalytic materials for environmental catalysis

2) Novel catalytic processes for pollutants degradation

3) Catalyst preparation methodologies for remediation of environmental pollutions

4) Catalysts for energy conversions

Dr. Shaohong Zang
Dr. Liuye Mo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • environmental catalysis
  • catalytic elimination of environmental pollutants
  • clean energy produced by catalysis
  • green catalytic processes
  • catalyst prepared methodology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 3833 KiB  
Article
Ce1−xSnxO2 Catalysts Prepared with Combustion Method for Catalytic Combustion of Ethyl Acetate
by Yue Jiang, Qing Wang, Jing Xu, Shaohong Zang, Liqiao Chen, Luhui Wang and Liuye Mo
Catalysts 2023, 13(11), 1400; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal13111400 - 27 Oct 2023
Viewed by 917
Abstract
A series of Ce1−XSnXO2 (X = 0, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.9, 1) catalysts were synthesized via the combustion method. The physical and chemical structures of the prepared catalysts were systematically characterized by XRD, BET, SEM, TEM, XPS, [...] Read more.
A series of Ce1−XSnXO2 (X = 0, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.9, 1) catalysts were synthesized via the combustion method. The physical and chemical structures of the prepared catalysts were systematically characterized by XRD, BET, SEM, TEM, XPS, and TPR. The Ce1−XSnXO2 catalysts have higher catalytic activities than the mono-oxide catalysts, as there are synergistic effects between CeO2 and SnO2. The catalytic activities of the Ce1−XSnXO2 catalysts are dependent on the X for the catalytic combustion of ethyl acetate (EA). The Ce1−XSnXO2 (X < 0.5) catalysts show high catalytic performances. Meanwhile, the Ce0.8Sn0.2O2 and Ce0.7Sn0.3O2 catalysts display the highest catalytic performance, with T50 = 190 °C and T90 = 210 °C. More importantly, the Ce0.8Sn0.2O2 catalyst exhibits superior thermal and catalytic activity stability. It is found that the Ce1−XSnXO2 catalysts form solid solutions, as the X is <0.5. The reduction of Sn4+ species to Sn2+ is significantly promoted by the CeO2, which is an important factor attributed to the high catalytic activities of the solid solution Ce1−XSnXO2 catalysts. The catalytic activities of the Ce1−XSnXO2 catalysts exhibit a strong correlation to the surface atomic areas of Ce3+ and Oα (VO). In other words, the higher surface atomic areas of Ce3+ and Oα (VO) are, the higher the catalytic activities will have. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Catalytic Technology for Environmental Pollution Control)
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14 pages, 3385 KiB  
Article
Fe-N-C Catalyst Derived from MOFs with Enhanced Catalytic Performance for Selective Oxidation of Emerging Contaminants
by Cheng Zeng, Yan Wang, Jinquan Wan and Zhicheng Yan
Catalysts 2023, 13(6), 1021; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal13061021 - 19 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1087
Abstract
Fe-N-C/peroxymonosulfate (PMS) systems have demonstrated selective oxidation of pollutants, but the underlying mechanism and reasons for variability remain unclear. In this work, we synthesized a highly active Fe-N-C catalyst derived from MOFs using a pyrolysis protection strategy. We assessed its catalytic activity by [...] Read more.
Fe-N-C/peroxymonosulfate (PMS) systems have demonstrated selective oxidation of pollutants, but the underlying mechanism and reasons for variability remain unclear. In this work, we synthesized a highly active Fe-N-C catalyst derived from MOFs using a pyrolysis protection strategy. We assessed its catalytic activity by employing PMS as an activator for pollutant degradation. The presence of Fe-Nx sites favored the catalytic performance of FeMIL-N-C, exhibiting 23 times higher activity compared to N-C. Moreover, we investigated the degradation performance and mechanism of the FeMIL-N-C/PMS system through both experimental and theoretical analyses, focusing on pollutants with diverse electronic structures, namely bisphenol A (BPA) and atrazine (ATZ)N-C. Our findings revealed that the degradation of ATZ primarily follows the free radical pathway, whereas BPA degradation is dominated by electron transfer pathways. Specifically, pollutants with a low LUMO- HOMO energy gap (BPA) can be degraded via the FeMIL-N-C/PMS system through the electron transfer pathway. Conversely, pollutants with a high LUMO-HOMO energy gap (ATZ) exhibit limited electron donation and predominantly undergo degradation through the free radical pathway. This work introduces novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the selective oxidation of pollutants, facilitating a deeper understanding of effective pollutant removal strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Catalytic Technology for Environmental Pollution Control)
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