Special Issue "Selected Papers the Mechanobiology in Biomimetics 2018 Annual Symposium"

A special issue of Biomimetics (ISSN 2313-7673).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Mathieu Hautefeuille
Website
Guest Editor
Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior S/N, Ciudad Universitaria, Ciudad de Mexico CP 04500, Mexico.
Interests: hydrogels; microfluidics; organ on chip; biomimetic microenvironment;3D cell culture; microfabrication
Dr. Genaro Vázquez-Victorio
Website
Guest Editor
Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior S/N, Ciudad Universitaria, Ciudad de Mexico CP 04500, Mexico

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

LaNSBioDyT National Laboratory for the development of biomimetic solutions for diagnostics and therapy was founded in 2015 to organize the efforts of several scientific laboratories in physics, chemistry, engineering, mathematics, and other disciplines that use microtechnology, materials science, and biomedical research. It is organizing its 2nd Symposium from November 12th to 16th of November 2018 at the School of Science, UNAM, Mexico. On this occasion, we are expecting plenary presentations of international experts in several fields related to the design and construction of biomimetic platforms aimed at fabricating cellular culture microenvironments similar to what cells and tissues experience in vivo.

Topics will range from construction materials (especially hydrogels) for stiffness and topology control, characterization, and measurements tools, as well as physico-mathematical models, to better understanding cell-to-substrate and cell-to-cell adhesions, construction, the use of complex biomimetic platforms to preserve phenotype in vitro, 3D biomimetic geometries, microfluidica, and more. Scientists and researchers from Mexico and the surrounding region are invited to share the latest developments in this growing field of bioinspired materials and 3D platforms.

This Special Issue is cooperating with our Symposium (https://sites.google.com/ciencias.unam.mx/lansbiodyt/comunicación/), and all speakers and registered participants at this conference are invited to submit a manuscript for publication.

Dr. Mathieu Hautefeuille
Dr. Genaro Vázquez-Victorio
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomimetics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Cell Culture Platforms with Controllable Stiffness for Chick Embryonic Cardiomyocytes
Biomimetics 2019, 4(2), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics4020033 - 27 Apr 2019
Abstract
For several years, cell culture techniques have been physiologically relevant to understand living organisms both structurally and functionally, aiming at preserving as carefully as possible the in vivo integrity and function of the cells. However, when studying cardiac cells, glass or plastic Petri [...] Read more.
For several years, cell culture techniques have been physiologically relevant to understand living organisms both structurally and functionally, aiming at preserving as carefully as possible the in vivo integrity and function of the cells. However, when studying cardiac cells, glass or plastic Petri dishes and culture-coated plates lack important cues that do not allow to maintain the desired phenotype, especially for primary cell culture. In this work, we show that microscaffolds made with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) enable modulating the stiffness of the surface of the culture substrate and this originates different patterns of adhesion, self-organization, and synchronized or propagated activity in the culture of chick embryonic cardiomyocytes. Thanks to the calcium imaging technique, we found that the substrate stiffness affected cardiomyocyte adhesion, as well as the calcium signal propagation in the formed tissue. The patterns of activity shown by the calcium fluorescence variations are reliable clues of the functional organization achieved by the cell layers. We found that PDMS substrates with a stiffness of 25 kPa did not allow the formation of cell layers and therefore the optimal propagation of the intracellular calcium signals, while softer PDMS substrates with Young’s modulus within the physiological in vivo reported range did permit synchronized and coordinated contractility and intracellular calcium activity. This type of methodology allows us to study phenomena such as arrhythmias. For example, the occurrence of synchronized activity or rotors that can initiate or maintain cardiac arrhythmias can be reproduced on different substrates for study, so that replacement tissues or patches can be better designed. Full article
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