Anti-inflammatory Activity of Plant Polyphenols 2.0

A special issue of Biomedicines (ISSN 2227-9059). This special issue belongs to the section "Drug Discovery, Development and Delivery".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 September 2021) | Viewed by 23330

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Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacological and Biomolecular Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy
Interests: botanicals; plant polyphenols; berries; gastro-intestinal inflammation; skin inflammation; bio-guided fractionation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacological and Biomolecular Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy
Interests: botanicals; gastritis; inflammation; plant extracts; gastrointestinal epithelium
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce the second volume of the Special Issue “Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Plant Polyphenols”. Inflammation is the first bodily response to infection or injury and is critical for both innate and adaptive immunity. It can be considered part of the complex biological response of vascular tissues to harmful stimuli such as pathogens, damaged cells, and irritants. Uncontrolled inflammation often results in the development of chronic diseases such as gastritis, arthritis, autoimmune disorders, degenerative joint diseases, rheumatisms, atherosclerosis, diabetes, and even cancer. The inflammatory process is characterized by the migration of immune cells from blood vessels to the site of inflammation with massive release of pro-inflammatory mediators including cytokines, chemokines, prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and oxidative agents.

New strategies that are able to interfere with these mechanisms by preventing prolonged inflammation will greatly benefit numerous areas. In this respect, the plant kingdom has developed a multitude of secondary metabolites, many of which are recognized as useful tools for the maintenance of human health. Several botanicals from edible or medicinal plants are consumed worldwide for health purposes as different types of products including herbal medicinal products, plant food supplements, and functional foods. The purpose of this Special Issue of Biomedicines is to collect new findings on the anti-inflammatory activities of plant polyphenols as individual compounds or as ingredients of extracts, focusing mostly on their effects on the inhibition of pro-inflammatory mediators and their mechanisms of action. Both in vitro and in vivo studies are welcome.

Prof. Mario Dell'Agli
Dr. Enrico Sangiovanni
Guest Editors

Keywords

  • botanicals
  • plant polyphenols
  • anti-inflammatory
  • cytokines
  • transcription factors
  • chemokines
  • pro-inflammatory mediators
  • eicosanoids
  • secondary metabolites

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Editorial

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4 pages, 197 KiB  
Editorial
Special Issue: Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Plant Polyphenols 2.0
by Enrico Sangiovanni and Mario Dell’Agli
Biomedicines 2022, 10(1), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines10010037 - 24 Dec 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1888
Abstract
Inflammation is a complex process that occurs in response to infections or other tissue damages, such as trauma, wounds, burns, and toxic substances [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anti-inflammatory Activity of Plant Polyphenols 2.0)

Research

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14 pages, 6616 KiB  
Article
Curcumin and Radiotherapy Exert Synergistic Anti-Glioma Effect In Vitro
by Vasiliki Zoi, Vasiliki Galani, Evrysthenis Vartholomatos, Natalia Zacharopoulou, Eftichia Tsoumeleka, Georgios Gkizas, Georgios Bozios, Pericles Tsekeris, Ieremias Chousidis, Ioannis Leonardos, Andreas G. Tzakos, Athanasios P. Kyritsis and George A. Alexiou
Biomedicines 2021, 9(11), 1562; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines9111562 - 28 Oct 2021
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 2931
Abstract
Curcumin, a bioactive polyphenol, is known to have anticancer properties. In this study, the effectiveness of curcumin pretreatment as a strategy for radio-sensitizing glioblastoma cell lines was explored. For this, U87 and T98 cells were treated with curcumin, exposed to 2 Gy or [...] Read more.
Curcumin, a bioactive polyphenol, is known to have anticancer properties. In this study, the effectiveness of curcumin pretreatment as a strategy for radio-sensitizing glioblastoma cell lines was explored. For this, U87 and T98 cells were treated with curcumin, exposed to 2 Gy or 4 Gy of irradiation, and the combined effect was compared to the antiproliferative effect of each agent when given individually. Cell viability and proliferation were evaluated with the trypan blue exclusion assay and the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The synergistic effects of the combination treatment were analyzed with CompuSyn software. To examine how the co-treatment affected different phases of cell-cycle progression, a cell-cycle analysis via flow cytometry was performed. Treatment with curcumin and radiation significantly reduced cell viability in both U87 and T98 cell lines. The combination treatment arrested both cell lines at the G2/M phase to a higher extent than radiation or curcumin treatment alone. The synergistic effect of curcumin when combined with temozolomide resulted in increased tumor cell death. Our results demonstrate for the first time that low doses of curcumin and irradiation exhibit a strong synergistic anti-proliferative effect on glioblastoma cells in vitro. Therefore, this combination may represent an innovative and promising strategy for the treatment of glioblastoma, and further studies are needed to fully understand the molecular mechanism underlying this effect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anti-inflammatory Activity of Plant Polyphenols 2.0)
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21 pages, 5464 KiB  
Article
Caffeic Acid, One of the Major Phenolic Acids of the Medicinal Plant Antirhea borbonica, Reduces Renal Tubulointerstitial Fibrosis
by Bryan Veeren, Matthieu Bringart, Chloe Turpin, Philippe Rondeau, Cynthia Planesse, Imade Ait-Arsa, Fanny Gimié, Claude Marodon, Olivier Meilhac, Marie-Paule Gonthier, Nicolas Diotel and Jean-Loup Bascands
Biomedicines 2021, 9(4), 358; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines9040358 - 30 Mar 2021
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3129
Abstract
The renal fibrotic process is characterized by a chronic inflammatory state and oxidative stress. Antirhea borbonica (A. borbonica) is a French medicinal plant found in Reunion Island and known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities mostly related to its high polyphenols [...] Read more.
The renal fibrotic process is characterized by a chronic inflammatory state and oxidative stress. Antirhea borbonica (A. borbonica) is a French medicinal plant found in Reunion Island and known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities mostly related to its high polyphenols content. We investigated whether oral administration of polyphenol-rich extract from A. borbonica could exert in vivo a curative anti-renal fibrosis effect. To this aim, three days after unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO), mice were daily orally treated either with a non-toxic dose of polyphenol-rich extract from A. borbonica or with caffeic acid (CA) for 5 days. The polyphenol-rich extract from A. borbonica, as well as CA, the predominant phenolic acid of this medicinal plant, exerted a nephroprotective effect through the reduction in the three phases of the fibrotic process: (i) macrophage infiltration, (ii) myofibroblast appearance and (iii) extracellular matrix accumulation. These effects were associated with the mRNA down-regulation of Tgf-β, Tnf-α, Mcp1 and NfkB, as well as the upregulation of Nrf2. Importantly, we observed an increased antioxidant enzyme activity for GPX and Cu/ZnSOD. Last but not least, desorption electrospray ionization-high resolution/mass spectrometry (DESI-HR/MS) imaging allowed us to visualize, for the first time, CA in the kidney tissue. The present study demonstrates that polyphenol-rich extract from A. borbonica significantly improves, in a curative way, renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis progression in the UUO mouse model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anti-inflammatory Activity of Plant Polyphenols 2.0)
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15 pages, 1682 KiB  
Article
Verbascoside Protects Pancreatic β-Cells against ER-Stress
by Alessandra Galli, Paola Marciani, Algerta Marku, Silvia Ghislanzoni, Federico Bertuzzi, Raffaella Rossi, Alessia Di Giancamillo, Michela Castagna and Carla Perego
Biomedicines 2020, 8(12), 582; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines8120582 - 8 Dec 2020
Cited by 29 | Viewed by 3668
Abstract
Substantial epidemiological evidence indicates that a diet rich in polyphenols protects against developing type 2 diabetes. The phenylethanoid glycoside verbascoside/acteoside, a widespread polyphenolic plant compound, has several biological properties including strong antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective activities. The aim of this research was to [...] Read more.
Substantial epidemiological evidence indicates that a diet rich in polyphenols protects against developing type 2 diabetes. The phenylethanoid glycoside verbascoside/acteoside, a widespread polyphenolic plant compound, has several biological properties including strong antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective activities. The aim of this research was to test the possible effects of verbascoside on pancreatic β-cells, a target never tested before. Mouse and human β-cells were incubated with verbascoside (0.8–16 µM) for up to five days and a combination of biochemical and imaging techniques were used to assess the β-cell survival and function under normal or endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress inducing conditions. We found a dose-dependent protective effect of verbascoside against oxidative stress in clonal and human β-cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that the polyphenol protects β-cells against ER-stress mediated dysfunctions, modulating the activation of the protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) branch of the unfolded protein response and promoting mitochondrial dynamics. As a result, increased viability, mitochondrial function and insulin content were detected in these cells. These studies provide the evidence that verbascoside boosts the ability of β-cells to cope with ER-stress, an important contributor of β-cell dysfunction and failure in diabetic conditions and support the therapeutic potential of verbascoside in diabetes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anti-inflammatory Activity of Plant Polyphenols 2.0)
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Review

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22 pages, 913 KiB  
Review
Antiviral Effects of Polyphenols from Marine Algae
by Natalya N. Besednova, Boris G. Andryukov, Tatyana S. Zaporozhets, Sergey P. Kryzhanovsky, Ludmila N. Fedyanina, Tatyana A. Kuznetsova, Tatyana N. Zvyagintseva and Mikhail Yu. Shchelkanov
Biomedicines 2021, 9(2), 200; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines9020200 - 17 Feb 2021
Cited by 48 | Viewed by 4778
Abstract
The disease-preventive and medicinal properties of plant polyphenolic compounds have long been known. As active ingredients, they are used to prevent and treat many noncommunicable diseases. In recent decades, marine macroalgae have attracted the attention of biotechnologists and pharmacologists as a promising and [...] Read more.
The disease-preventive and medicinal properties of plant polyphenolic compounds have long been known. As active ingredients, they are used to prevent and treat many noncommunicable diseases. In recent decades, marine macroalgae have attracted the attention of biotechnologists and pharmacologists as a promising and almost inexhaustible source of polyphenols. This heterogeneous group of compounds contains many biopolymers with unique structure and biological properties that exhibit high anti-infective activity. In the present review, the authors focus on the antiviral potential of polyphenolic compounds (phlorotannins) from marine algae and consider the mechanisms of their action as well as other biological properties of these compounds that have effects on the progress and outcome of viral infections. Effective nutraceuticals, to be potentially developed on the basis of algal polyphenols, can also be used in the complex therapy of viral diseases. It is necessary to extend in vivo studies on laboratory animals, which subsequently will allow proceeding to clinical tests. Polyphenolic compounds have a great potential as active ingredients to be used for the creation of new antiviral pharmaceutical substances. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anti-inflammatory Activity of Plant Polyphenols 2.0)
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31 pages, 1549 KiB  
Review
Dietary Flavonoids in p53—Mediated Immune Dysfunctions Linking to Cancer Prevention
by Shoib Sarwar Siddiqui, Sofia Rahman, H.P. Vasantha Rupasinghe and Cijo George Vazhappilly
Biomedicines 2020, 8(8), 286; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines8080286 - 13 Aug 2020
Cited by 27 | Viewed by 5394
Abstract
The p53 protein plays a central role in mediating immune functioning and determines the fate of the cells. Its role as a tumor suppressor, and in transcriptional regulation and cytokine activity under stress conditions, is well defined. The wild type (WT) p53 functions [...] Read more.
The p53 protein plays a central role in mediating immune functioning and determines the fate of the cells. Its role as a tumor suppressor, and in transcriptional regulation and cytokine activity under stress conditions, is well defined. The wild type (WT) p53 functions as a guardian for the genome, while the mutant p53 has oncogenic roles. One of the ways that p53 combats carcinogenesis is by reducing inflammation. WT p53 functions as an anti-inflammatory molecule via cross-talk activity with multiple immunological pathways, such as the major histocompatibility complex I (MHCI) associated pathway, toll-like receptors (TLRs), and immune checkpoints. Due to the multifarious roles of p53 in cancer, it is a potent target for cancer immunotherapy. Plant flavonoids have been gaining recognition over the last two decades to use as a potential therapeutic regimen in ameliorating diseases. Recent studies have shown the ability of flavonoids to suppress chronic inflammation, specifically by modulating p53 responses. Further, the anti-oxidant Keap1/Nrf2/ARE pathway could play a crucial role in mitigating oxidative stress, leading to a reduction of chronic inflammation linked to the prevention of cancer. This review aims to discuss the pharmacological properties of plant flavonoids in response to various oxidative stresses and immune dysfunctions and analyzes the cross-talk between flavonoid-rich dietary intake for potential disease prevention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anti-inflammatory Activity of Plant Polyphenols 2.0)
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