Telomere Biology in Human Health, Aging and Diseases

A special issue of Biomedicines (ISSN 2227-9059). This special issue belongs to the section "Cell Biology and Pathology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 1993

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Telocyte LLC, Grand Rapids, MI, USA
Interests: telomeres; telomerase; dementia; gene therapy; Alzheimer’s; age-related disease; cardiovascular disease

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Guest Editor
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
Interests: telomeres; telomerase; aging; gene and cell therapies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The cascade of events that occur during cell aging—the process underlying all age-related diseases—is complex, but a unified model is not only feasible but offers optimal clinical targets, such as the telomere. This issue focuses on the role of telomere loss in modulating cell aging and age-related diseases, as well as on the potential to intervene effectively to prevent and cure such age-related diseases through the use of telomerase and similar approaches to effectively reverse cell aging.

Dr. Michael Fossel
Dr. Kurt Whittemore
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • telomere
  • telomerase
  • gene therapy
  • age-related disease
  • dementia
  • cardiovascular disease
  • osteoarthritis
  • osteoporosis
  • renal aging
  • cell aging
  • cell senescence
  • epigenetics
  • mitochondria
  • aging

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 1329 KiB  
Article
Joint Effects of Exercise and Ramadan Fasting on Telomere Length: Implications for Cellular Aging
by Shamma Almuraikhy, Maha Sellami, Khaled Naja, Hadaia Saleh Al-Amri, Najeha Anwardeen, Amina Aden, Alexander Dömling and Mohamed A. Elrayess
Biomedicines 2024, 12(6), 1182; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines12061182 - 27 May 2024
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Abstract
Aging is a fundamental biological process that progressively impairs the functionality of the bodily systems, leading to an increased risk of diseases. Telomere length is one of the most often used biomarkers of aging. Recent research has focused on developing interventions to mitigate [...] Read more.
Aging is a fundamental biological process that progressively impairs the functionality of the bodily systems, leading to an increased risk of diseases. Telomere length is one of the most often used biomarkers of aging. Recent research has focused on developing interventions to mitigate the effects of aging and improve the quality of life. The objective of this study was to investigate the combined effect of exercise and Ramadan fasting on telomere length. Twenty-nine young, non-obese, healthy females were randomized into two groups: the control group underwent a 4-week exercise training program, and the second group underwent a 4-week exercise training program while fasting during Ramadan. Blood samples were collected, and measurements of clinical traits, cytokines, oxidative stress, and telomere length were performed before and after intervention. Telomere length increased significantly from baseline in the exercise-while-fasting group, but showed no significant change in the exercise control group. This increase was accompanied by a reduction in TNF-α, among other cytokines. Additionally, a significant positive correlation was observed between the mean change in telomere length and HDL in the exercise-while-fasting group only. This study is the first to report an increase in telomere length after combining Ramadan fasting with training, suggesting that exercising while fasting may be an effective tool for slowing down the aging rate. Further studies using larger and more diverse cohorts are warranted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Telomere Biology in Human Health, Aging and Diseases)
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18 pages, 2747 KiB  
Article
Telomere Dysfunction in Pediatric Patients with Differences/Disorders of Sexual Development
by Haifaou Younoussa, Macoura Gadji, Mamadou Soumboundou, Bruno Colicchio, Ahmed Said, Ndeye Aby Ndoye, Steffen Junker, Andreas Plesch, Leonhard Heidingsfelder, Ndeye Rama Diagne, Alain Dieterlen, Philippe Voisin, Patrice Carde, Eric Jeandidier and Radhia M’kacher
Biomedicines 2024, 12(3), 565; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines12030565 - 2 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Differences/Disorders of sex development (DSDs) are conditions in which the development of chromosomal, gonadal, and anatomical sexes is atypical. DSDs are relatively rare, but their incidence is becoming alarmingly common in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Their etiologies and mechanisms are poorly understood. Therefore, we [...] Read more.
Differences/Disorders of sex development (DSDs) are conditions in which the development of chromosomal, gonadal, and anatomical sexes is atypical. DSDs are relatively rare, but their incidence is becoming alarmingly common in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Their etiologies and mechanisms are poorly understood. Therefore, we have investigated cytogenetic profiles, including telomere dysfunction, in a retrospective cohort of Senegalese DSD patients. Materials and methods: Peripheral blood lymphocytes were sampled from 35 DSD patients (mean age: 3.3 years; range 0–18 years) admitted to two hospital centers in Dakar. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from 150 healthy donors were used as a control. Conventional cytogenetics, telomere, and centromere staining followed by multiplex FISH, as well as FISH with SRY-specific probes, were employed. Results: Cytogenetic analysis identified 19 male and 13 female patients with apparently normal karyotypes, two patients with Turner syndrome, and one patient with Klinefelter syndrome. Additional structural chromosome aberrations were detected in 22% of the patients (8/35). Telomere analysis revealed a reduction in mean telomere lengths of DSD patients compared to those of healthy donors of similar age. This reduction in telomere length was associated with an increased rate of telomere aberrations (telomere loss and the formation of telomere doublets) and the presence of additional chromosomal aberrations. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate a correlation between telomere dysfunction and DSDs. Further studies may reveal the link between telomere dysfunction and possible mechanisms involved in the disease itself, such as DNA repair deficiency or specific gene mutations. The present study demonstrates the relevance of implementing telomere analysis in prenatal tests as well as in diagnosed genetic DSD disorders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Telomere Biology in Human Health, Aging and Diseases)
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