Special Issue "Climate Change Impacts on Coastal Areas"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Climatology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Han Soo Lee
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Graduate School for International Development and Cooperation, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima, Japan
Interests: coastal hazards; typhoons; climate change impacts on typhoons, storm surge, tsunami, and coastal flood
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues

According to the UN Atlas of the Oceans, about 44% of the world’s population lives in coastal areas within
150 km of the sea. On the other hand, coastal regions are constantly exposed to natural hazards and disasters such as storm waves, storm surges, floods and inundations due to tropical cyclones and storms, and tsunamis due to underwater earthquake, volcanic eruption, and landslides. For each disaster, it is not possible to reproduce, evaluate and even predict it without understanding the physical processes of each element of the Earth system (atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere) as a cause and the interaction among the elements.

This Special Issue seeks to compile the current state of the art related to climate impacts on coastal areas through coastal hazards due to changed frequency and intensity of tropical cyclones and extra-tropical cyclones, tropical cyclone induced storm surge, surface waves, and coastal flooding. Contributions are encouraged in topics including, but not limited

  • Climate change impacts on tropical cyclone occurrence frequency
  • Climate change impacts on tropical cyclone intensity
  • Tropical and extra-tropical cyclone induced storm surge
  • Tropical and extra-tropical cyclone induced surface waves
  • Climate change impacts on coastal flooding
  • Climate change impacts on coastal flood risk, and its assessment and management

Dr. Han Soo Lee
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • climate change
  • coastal hazards
  • tropical cyclones
  • storm surge
  • waves
  • wave climate
  • coastal floods
  • typhoon–sea interaction
  • coastal risk assessment and management

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Changes in Means and Extreme Events of Sea Surface Temperature in the East China Seas Based on Satellite Data from 1982 to 2017
Atmosphere 2019, 10(3), 140; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10030140 - 14 Mar 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1417
Abstract
Marginal seas are fundamental to humans for their importance in mariculture resources and commerce. Based on the NOAA 0.25 degree daily Optimum Interpolation (OI) sea surface temperature (SST) data set, spatiotemporal changes in mean and extreme SST in the East China Seas (ECSs) [...] Read more.
Marginal seas are fundamental to humans for their importance in mariculture resources and commerce. Based on the NOAA 0.25 degree daily Optimum Interpolation (OI) sea surface temperature (SST) data set, spatiotemporal changes in mean and extreme SST in the East China Seas (ECSs) were examined for from 1982 to 2017. As a regional average, the annual mean SST has notably increased at a rate of 0.21 ± 0.08 °C per decade. The warming SST during 1982–2017 is probably related to the influence from a recent strengthening and westward extension of the WPSH. There are also notable warming trends in annual minimum and maximum SST. Spatially, the rapid warming of annual mean SSTs are located in the vicinity of the Yangtze Estuary, exceeding 0.2 °C per decade and part of the ECS-Kuroshio. This pattern may be largely affected by the spatial changes of minimum SST. Rapid warming of maximum SST can be found across the region, from the northern East China Sea (ECS) to the Bohai Sea. Since 1982, extreme hot days (EHDs) have undergone an obvious increasing trend, at a rate of 15.2 days per decade. Conversely, extreme cold days (ECDs) have been decreasing. Notably, the largest increase of EHDs appears in the western ECS and the Bohai Sea, which both have rich marine ecosystems. The trend of EHDs has a significant relationship to mean SST, suggesting that there will be a further increase in EHDs under continued warming in the ECSs. These findings emphasize the importance and urgency of strategies which should be planned for the adaptation and mitigation of specific types of extreme hot events in this region. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change Impacts on Coastal Areas)
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Article
Spatiotemporal Patterns and Evolution of Storm Surge Threats along the Southeastern Coastline of China
Atmosphere 2019, 10(2), 61; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10020061 - 01 Feb 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1062
Abstract
The variability of storm surge poses a significant threat to coastal areas. A new metric named Accumulated Storm surge Potential Impact (ASPI) is proposed based on a new intensity parameter that removes other components from storm surge-induced water level rise. This new metric [...] Read more.
The variability of storm surge poses a significant threat to coastal areas. A new metric named Accumulated Storm surge Potential Impact (ASPI) is proposed based on a new intensity parameter that removes other components from storm surge-induced water level rise. This new metric quantifies storm surge threat by combining frequency and intensity. The results show that storm surge threat has increased since the late 1990s due to greater general storm surges. The extreme storm surge threat did not follow the increasing trend until the mid-2000s. Different regional distribution patterns are found along this coast. The storm surge threat exhibited a -++ zonal tripole pattern, the negative phase was along the north coastline of Hangzhou Gulf and the positive phase was from the center to southern coast area of Zhejiang province and along the eastern coast area of Leizhou Peninsula. Long-term storm surge threats change spatial distribution pattern in three periods. More precarious threats from the center to southern coast areas of Zhejiang province illustrated a poleward shift of storm surge threats consistent with the trend of long-term tropical cyclone landfall. Meanwhile, the strong threat along the eastern coast line of Leizhou Peninsula was sustained from 1960 to 1995, then became weaker from 1996 to 2015. The evolution pattern of storm surge threat along the southeastern coastline of China could be applied for coastal adaptation research under climate change scenarios. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change Impacts on Coastal Areas)
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