Chemistry of Aqueous Surfaces in the Atmospheric Context

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosphere/Hydrosphere/Land–Atmosphere Interactions".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (9 October 2020) | Viewed by 6910

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Cain Department of Chemical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA
Interests: environmental chemical engineering; atmospheric chemistry; wastewater treatment

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Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506, USA
Interests: environmental photochemistry; interfacial oxidations; environmental monitoring; prebiotic chemistry; photocatalytic CO2 reduction; environmental chemistry
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Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Interests: atmospheric chemistry; photochemistry; source apportionment; new particle formation; acidic ultrafine particles; indoor and outdoor air pollution; secondary organic aerosol

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The air–water interface in atmospheric water films of aerosols and hydrometeors (fog, mist, ice, rain, and snow) presents an important surface for the adsorption and reaction of many organic trace gases and gaseous reactive oxidants. Knowledge of air–water interface partitioning is necessary for understanding the significance of the interface in atmospheric fate and transport processes. To do this, various methods of assessing both experimental and theoretical values of the thermodynamic partition constant and adsorption isotherm are required. Further, it is necessary to evaluate the interfacial reactivity of trace gases and oxidants. Oxidation will likely result in water-soluble compounds that serve as precursors for secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). The estimation of heterogeneous photooxidation rates in water films and solid films, and comparison with homogeneous gas-phase reactions are necessary to make progress in atmospheric modeling with the inclusion of interfacial processes. These parameters obtained through various methods can be mutually verified by combining field sampling results with related chemical transport models and chemical box models. This issue of Atmosphere will deal with the above aspects, and we suggest papers to be submitted in these areas.

Prof. Dr. Kalliat T. Valsaraj
Prof. Dr. Marcelo I. Guzman
Prof. Dr. Hai Guo
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • air-water interface
  • adsorption
  • reaction
  • atmospheric droplets
  • aerosols
  • oxidation products
  • pollutant cycling

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 11840 KiB  
Article
Studying Interfacial Dark Reactions of Glyoxal and Hydrogen Peroxide Using Vacuum Ultraviolet Single Photon Ionization Mass Spectrometry
by Xiao Sui, Bo Xu, Jiachao Yu, Oleg Kostko, Musahid Ahmed and Xiao Ying Yu
Atmosphere 2021, 12(3), 338; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12030338 - 5 Mar 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2159
Abstract
Aqueous secondary organic aerosol (aqSOA) formation from volatile and semivolatile organic compounds at the air–liquid interface is considered as an important source of fine particles in the atmosphere. However, due to the lack of in situ detecting techniques, the detailed interfacial reaction mechanism [...] Read more.
Aqueous secondary organic aerosol (aqSOA) formation from volatile and semivolatile organic compounds at the air–liquid interface is considered as an important source of fine particles in the atmosphere. However, due to the lack of in situ detecting techniques, the detailed interfacial reaction mechanism and dynamics still remain uncertain. In this study, synchrotron-based vacuum ultraviolet single-photon ionization mass spectrometry (VUV SPI-MS) was coupled with the System for Analysis at the Liquid Vacuum Interface (SALVI) to investigate glyoxal dark oxidation products at the aqueous surface. Mass spectral analysis and determination of appearance energies (AEs) suggest that the main products of glyoxal dark interfacial aging are carboxylic acid related oligomers. Furthermore, the VUV SPI-MS results were compared and validated against those of in situ liquid time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The reaction mechanisms of the dark glyoxal interfacial oxidation, obtained using two different approaches, indicate that differences in ionization and instrument operation principles could contribute to their abilities to detect different oligomers. Therefore, the mechanistic differences revealed between the VUV SPI-MS and ToF-SIMS indicate that more in situ and real-time techniques are needed to investigate the contribution of the air–liquid interfacial reactions leading to aqSOA formation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemistry of Aqueous Surfaces in the Atmospheric Context)
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16 pages, 4819 KiB  
Article
Carbonaceous Aerosols in PM1, PM2.5, and PM10 Size Fractions over the Lanzhou City, Northwest China
by Xin Zhang, Zhongqin Li, Feiteng Wang, Mengyuan Song, Xi Zhou and Jing Ming
Atmosphere 2020, 11(12), 1368; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11121368 - 17 Dec 2020
Cited by 24 | Viewed by 2945
Abstract
Carbonaceous particles have been confirmed as major components of ambient aerosols in urban environments and are related to climate impacts and environmental and health effects. In this study, we collected different-size particulate matter (PM) samples (PM1, PM2.5, and PM [...] Read more.
Carbonaceous particles have been confirmed as major components of ambient aerosols in urban environments and are related to climate impacts and environmental and health effects. In this study, we collected different-size particulate matter (PM) samples (PM1, PM2.5, and PM10) at an urban site in Lanzhou, northwest China, during three discontinuous one-month periods (January, April, and July) of 2019. We measured the concentrations and potential transport pathways of carbonaceous aerosols in PM1, PM2.5, and PM10 size fractions. The average concentrations of OC (organic carbon) and EC (elemental carbon) in PM1, PM2.5, and PM10 were 6.98 ± 3.71 and 2.11 ± 1.34 μg/m3, 8.6 ± 5.09 and 2.55 ± 1.44 μg/m3, and 11.6 ± 5.72 and 4.01 ± 1.72 μg/m3. The OC and EC concentrations in PM1, PM2.5, and PM10 had similar seasonal trends, with higher values in winter due to the favorable meteorology for accumulating pollutants and urban-increased emissions from heating. Precipitation played a key role in scavenge pollutants, resulting in lower OC and EC concentrations in summer. The OC/EC ratios and principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the dominant pollution sources of carbon components in the PMs in Lanzhou were biomass burning, coal combustion, and diesel and gasoline vehicle emissions; and the backward trajectory and concentration weight trajectory (CWT) analysis further suggested that the primary pollution source of EC in Lanzhou was local fossil fuel combustion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemistry of Aqueous Surfaces in the Atmospheric Context)
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