Special Issue "Impacts of Climate Change on Water Resources"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosphere/Hydrosphere/Land - Atmosphere Interactions".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. María Jesús Esteban Parra

Departamento de Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: climate variability; climate change; dynamical downscaling; statistical downscaling; streamflow variability; drought; extreme events; teleconnections; seasonal forecasting

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Water is essential for life. Climate change can alter the balance between the different components of the hydrological cycle, being one of the main challenges facing humanity in the 21st century, particularly through its impacts on water resources. The question of whether changes in the hydrological cycle can modify precipitation patterns, increase the frequency and intensity of drought episodes, extreme rainfall events, and alter key aspects in atmosphere–land coupling and in the variability of runoff and streamflow, require studies that encompass diverse perspectives, from regional to global, and from time scales addressing from the changes already occurred to those projected in the future, quantifying their causes and their consequences on the water resources.

This Special Issue offers an opportunity to publish papers related to the impacts of climate change on water resources. Papers on observed and projected changes during the 21th century in the different components on the hydrological cycle affecting water resources (precipitation, evapotranspiration, streamflow, soil moisture, etc.) are welcome from different spatial scales and methodological approaches (statistical, physical, GCMs, downscaling, hydrological modeling, etc.), including extreme events studies as drought or examine changes between the coupling between the water cycle components. Papers dealing with the climate change implications in topics, such as water management or hydroenergy, are also of interest.

Dr. María Jesús Esteban Parra
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Atmosphere is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Climate change
  • Water resources
  • Hydrological cycle
  • Precipitation
  • Evapotranspiration
  • Streamflow
  • Runoff
  • Soil moisture
  • Groundwater
  • Headwater
  • Drought
  • Extreme precipitation
  • Floods
  • Atmosphere-land interactions
  • Climate models
  • Downscaling
  • Hydrological modelling
  • Water management

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Drought in the Western United States: Its Connections with Large-Scale Oceanic Oscillations
Atmosphere 2019, 10(2), 82; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10020082
Received: 12 January 2019 / Revised: 8 February 2019 / Accepted: 12 February 2019 / Published: 16 February 2019
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Abstract
In this paper, we applied the Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis on a drought index expressed as consecutive dry days (CDD) to identify the drought variability in western United States. Based on the EOF analysis, correlation maps were generated between the leading principle [...] Read more.
In this paper, we applied the Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis on a drought index expressed as consecutive dry days (CDD) to identify the drought variability in western United States. Based on the EOF analysis, correlation maps were generated between the leading principle component (PC) of seasonal CDD and sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies to explore the dynamic context of the leading modes in CDD. The EOF analysis indicates that the spatiotemporal pattern of winter CDD is related to an integrated impact from El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), and Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation (AMO), while summer CDD is mainly controlled by PDO phases. We also calculated seasonal CDD anomalies during selected climatic phases to further evaluate the impacts of large-scale oceanic oscillation on the spatial pattern of droughts. We found that AMO+/PDO− will contribute to a consistent drought condition during the winter in the western United States. El Niño will bring a dry winter to the northern part of western United States while La Niña will bring a dry winter to the southern part. During El Niño years, the drought center changes with the type of El Niño events. Considering the future states of the examined ocean oscillations, we suggest possible drier than normal conditions in the western United States for upcoming decades, and moreover, an intensified drought for the coast areas of the north Pacific region and upper Mississippi River Basin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impacts of Climate Change on Water Resources)
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Open AccessArticle
A Comprehensive Approach to Assess the Hydrological Drought of Inland River Basin in Northwest China
Atmosphere 2018, 9(10), 370; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos9100370
Received: 28 July 2018 / Revised: 19 September 2018 / Accepted: 21 September 2018 / Published: 22 September 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (3602 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
How to measure and quantitatively assess hydrological drought (HD) in the inland river basins of Northwest China is a difficult problem because of the complicated geographical environment and climatic processes. To address this problem, we conducted a comprehensive approach and selected the Aksu [...] Read more.
How to measure and quantitatively assess hydrological drought (HD) in the inland river basins of Northwest China is a difficult problem because of the complicated geographical environment and climatic processes. To address this problem, we conducted a comprehensive approach and selected the Aksu River Basin (ARB) as a typical inland river basin to quantitatively assess the hydrological drought based on the observed data and reanalysis data during the period of 1980–2010. We used two mutual complementing indicators, i.e., the standardized runoff index (SRI) and standardized terrestrial water storage index (SWSI), to quantitatively measure the spatio-temporal pattern of HD, where the SRI calculated from the observed runoff data indicate the time trend of HD of the whole basin, while SWSI extracted from the reanalysis data indicate the spatial pattern of HD. We also used the auto-regressive distribution lag model (ARDL) to show the autocorrelation of HD and its dependence on precipitation, potential evapotranspiration (PET), and soil moisture. The main conclusions are as follows: (a) the western and eastern regions of the ARB were prone to drought, whereas the frequency of drought in the middle of the ARB is relatively lower; (b) HD presents significant autocorrelation with two months’ lag, and soil moisture is correlated with SWSI with two months’ lag, whereas PET and precipitation are correlated with SWSI with 1 month’ lag; (c) the thresholds of HD for annual PET, annual precipitation, and annual average soil moisture are greater than 844.05 mm, less than 134.52 mm, and less than 411.07 kg/m2, respectively. A drought early warning system that is based on the thresholds was designed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impacts of Climate Change on Water Resources)
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