Special Issue "Changes in the Stratosphere, Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere Composition and Thermal Structure"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 September 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Maya Garcia-Comas

Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (IAA-CSIC), Granada, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: mesosphere and lower themosphere (MLT) thermal; chemical and dynamical structure; MLT variability; long-term trends; non-LTE modeling; IR observations; airglow; atmospheric variable retrievals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The emission of gases at the surface impacts the atmosphere as a whole, from the ground to the upper thermosphere. There is a deep interest in the determination of the induced changes in the stratosphere, mesosphere and lower thermosphere (SMLT) composition and temperature, and the understanding of coupling processes with other atmospheric regions, feedback mechanisms and interactions with climate. Variations in atmospheric constituents affect the energy budget, modifying temperatures and, ultimately, the extension of the atmosphere. They may also eventually alter the dynamics and phenomena propagating from and to other regions in the atmosphere. Changes of anthropogenic origin are superimposed to the considerable natural variability of this atmospheric region. Above all else, all these are interconnected and interaction between large-scale processes and the regional behavior also play a role.

Over the past decades, spaceborne and groundbased instrumentation have provided a wealth of observations of the SMLT. These have allowed for an unprecedented perception of the variability in the SMLT composition and thermal structure at multiple timescales, the interconnection with lower and upper regions and the influence of the solar cycle. Nonetheless, the portrait of the changes in this region is not univocal. This is in part due to limitations in the observations, which lead to sampling biases and disagreements between instruments.

This Special Issue calls for papers addressing the study of the SMLT temperature and composition and providing insights on variations at any timescale and their evolution from an observational perspective, either from space, from the ground or from a combination of them, and either at a local or a global scale. Discussions on effects from sampling biases and other sources of uncertainties are more than welcome. Contributions may cover any of the following topics:

- SMLT monitoring, climatologies, observational evidence for long-term changes, identification of drivers;
- Characterization of diurnal, seasonal and interannual variability and their evolution;
- Effect of gravity waves, planetary waves and tides and its evolution;
- Influence of the sun on SMLT variability;
- SMLT coupling processes with lower and upper atmospheric regions and their variability;
- Comparisons between instruments, determination of sampling biases and uncertainties, effect on the interpretation of variabilities at any timescale;
- Role of natural variability in secular trends, impact of short and mid-term variations on long-term trend estimates.

Dr. Maya Garcia-Comas
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Atmosphere is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • stratosphere, mesosphere, lower thermosphere observations
  • temperature and constituent abundances
  • atmospheric waves
  • atmospheric variability
  • climatologies and trends
  • atmospheric coupling

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle On the Roles of Advection and Solar Heating in Seasonal Variation of the Migrating Diurnal Tide in the Stratosphere, Mesosphere, and Lower Thermosphere
Atmosphere 2018, 9(11), 440; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos9110440
Received: 14 September 2018 / Revised: 5 November 2018 / Accepted: 6 November 2018 / Published: 12 November 2018
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Abstract
The migrating diurnal tide (DW1) presents a unique latitudinal structure in the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere. In this paper, the physical mechanisms that govern its seasonal variation are examined in these three regions using the 31.5-year (1979–2010) output from the extended Canadian
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The migrating diurnal tide (DW1) presents a unique latitudinal structure in the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere. In this paper, the physical mechanisms that govern its seasonal variation are examined in these three regions using the 31.5-year (1979–2010) output from the extended Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (eCMAM30). DW1 annual variation in the stratosphere is mainly controlled by the short-wave heating in the high latitudes, but by both the short-wave and adiabatic heating in the low latitudes. In the mesosphere, linear and nonlinear advection play important roles in the semiannual variation of the tide whereas short-wave heating does not. In the lower thermosphere, the annual variation of DW1 is mainly governed by the short-wave heating and linear advection. This study illustrates the complexity of the main physical mechanisms modulating the seasonal variations of DW1 in different regions of the atmosphere. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Statistics on Nonmigrating Diurnal Tides Generated by Tide-Planetary Wave Interaction and Their Relationship to Sudden Stratospheric Warming
Atmosphere 2018, 9(11), 416; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos9110416
Received: 4 September 2018 / Revised: 10 October 2018 / Accepted: 20 October 2018 / Published: 25 October 2018
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Abstract
The nonmigrating diurnal tide, DW2, is known to have a source from the stationary planetary wave with wavenumber 1 (SPW1) and the migrating diurnal tide (DW1) interaction. Recent research has shown that DW2 time evolution in the equatorial mesopause tracks very well with
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The nonmigrating diurnal tide, DW2, is known to have a source from the stationary planetary wave with wavenumber 1 (SPW1) and the migrating diurnal tide (DW1) interaction. Recent research has shown that DW2 time evolution in the equatorial mesopause tracks very well with SPW1 in the polar stratosphere for the winter of 2009–2010, which contains a sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) vortex split event. This paper extends previous research and investigates the relationship between these two waves for 31 winters from 1979 to 2010 with the extended Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (eCMAM) through correlation and composite analysis. Significant correlations are present between the two waves in 20 out of 31 winters (65%). We separate the 31 winters into four categories: SSW-displacement, SSW-split, minor-SSW, and no-SSW. Our results show that there is no significant difference among the four categories in terms of correlations between the two waves. Although SPW1 is usually stronger during a SSW-D winter, this does not warrant a stronger interaction with DW2. Full article
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Figure 1

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