Special Issue "Artists’ Books: Concept, Place, and a Quiet Revolution"

A special issue of Arts (ISSN 2076-0752).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (6 September 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Chris Taylor
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Professor, Deputy Head of School of Fine Art, History of Art and Cultural Studies, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT Leeds, UK
Interests: artists’ books; collaborative practice; contemporary art; drawing; printmaking

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since the early 1970s, the origins of artists' books has been extensively discussed and documented (Drücker, Lauf, Lippard, Phillpot, etc.), yet the genre continues to generate new questions and paradoxes regarding its place and status within the visual arts as a primary medium. Whilst the conception of contemporary artists' books lay in the medium's potential for dissemination via mass production and portability, opportunities for distribution remain limited to a select number of outlets worldwide or, as an alternative, through the growing number but time-limited artists' book fairs, such as the established events in Barcelona, Berlin, Bristol, Leeds, London, New York and Seoul.

In parallel with the development of screen-based digital technologies and social media platforms, we have experienced an exponential production of artists' books in contemporary art practice, craft and design. This has been a quiet revolution that emerged from both the centre and the fringes of the art world over six decades ago, developing relatively quickly as a gallery commodity through artefact/exhibition catalogue cross-overs, and more recently as a significant discipline in its own right within educational establishments. This begs the question, why, in an era of potentially print-free communication, do we continue to pursue the possibilities of the physical book format? What can the traditional structures of the codex, the leporello, the single section or that most basic and satisfying action of creasing a sheet of paper—the folio—offer the tech savvy audience or maker? 

What is the particular place within visual communication that the artists' book, the photo book or the zine holds, that other media or digital technologies fail to embrace?

Dr. Chris Taylor
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Arts is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • artists' books
  • artists' publications
  • book works
  • the library
  • site-specific
  • space of the page
  • letterpress
  • typography
  • collections
  • archives

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
The Artist’s Book in the Age of Digital Reproduction: Walter Benjamin and the Artist’s Book
Arts 2019, 8(4), 138; https://doi.org/10.3390/arts8040138 - 21 Oct 2019
Abstract
Walter Benjamin, who was familiar with the pre-Second World War avant-garde, argued that mechanization threatens the aura of art objects. The digital revolution has been seen as reconfirming Benjamin’s thesis, but the digital can be seen to reaffirm the value of the actual, [...] Read more.
Walter Benjamin, who was familiar with the pre-Second World War avant-garde, argued that mechanization threatens the aura of art objects. The digital revolution has been seen as reconfirming Benjamin’s thesis, but the digital can be seen to reaffirm the value of the actual, physical artist’s book, and moreover, artists have exploited the digital—as technologies and subject matter—to make artists’ books. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Artists’ Books: Concept, Place, and a Quiet Revolution)
Open AccessArticle
Artists’ Books as Resistant Transmitters
Arts 2019, 8(4), 129; https://doi.org/10.3390/arts8040129 - 09 Oct 2019
Abstract
Since the early 1970s, the origins of artists’ books have been extensively discussed and documented (Drücker, Lauf, Lippard, Phillpot, Gilbert et al.), yet the genre continues to generate new questions and paradoxes regarding its place and status within the visual arts as a [...] Read more.
Since the early 1970s, the origins of artists’ books have been extensively discussed and documented (Drücker, Lauf, Lippard, Phillpot, Gilbert et al.), yet the genre continues to generate new questions and paradoxes regarding its place and status within the visual arts as a primary medium. Whilst the conception of contemporary artists’ books lay in the medium’s potential for dissemination via mass production and portability, opportunities for distribution remain limited to a select number of outlets worldwide or, as an alternative, through the growing in number but time-limited artists’ book fairs, such as those established events in Barcelona, Berlin, Bristol, Leeds, London, New York and Seoul. In parallel with the development of screen-based digital technologies and social media platforms, we have experienced the exponential production of artists’ books in contemporary art practice, craft and design; a quiet revolution that emerged from both the centre and the fringes of the art world over six decades ago, developing relatively quickly as a gallery commodity through artefact/exhibition catalogue cross-overs, and more recently as a significant discipline in its own right within educational establishments. This begs the question, why, in an era of potentially print-free communication, do we continue to pursue the possibilities of the physical book format? What can the traditional structures of the codex, the leporello, the single section or that most basic and satisfying action of creasing a sheet of paper—the folio—offer the tech-savvy audience or maker? But artists’ publications offer alternative platforms for visual communication, resistant to formal forms of presentation, and they appeal to the hand and can question what it means to read in this digital age. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Artists’ Books: Concept, Place, and a Quiet Revolution)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop