Special Issue "Advances in Hyperspectral and Multispectral Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging of Tissue"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Optics and Lasers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Vladislav Toronov
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON M5B 2K3, Canada
Interests: optical and magnetic resonance biomedical imaging; nonlinear dynamics of the brain
Prof. Dr. Mamadou Diop
Website
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, ON N6A 3K7, Canada
Interests: developing noninvasive optical technologies; time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy; diffuse correlation spectroscopy; hyperspectral continuous-wave spectroscopy; 4D hyperspectral tomographic techniques; functional tissue imaging; multichannel derivative-spectroscopy
Prof. Dr. Angelo Sassaroli
Website
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155, USA
Interests: biological imaging tissues with near-infrared spectroscopy and diffuse tomography; biomedical diagnosis; brain and breast imaging; developing new analytical and statistical models for analyzing photon migrations in biological tissues
Prof. Dr. Ilias Tachtsidis
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK
Interests: next generation of optical non-invasive systems; functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS); optically measured biomarkers; non-invasive measurement; brain near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS); neuroscience; bomedical imaging

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Optical imaging and characterization of tissue has become a huge applied field due to the advantages of the optical analysis methods, which include non-invasiveness, portability, high sensitivity, and high spectral specificity. This research field continues to grow and spread in many different directions due to the development of new light sources and detectors, such as, for example, the supercontinuum and tunable lasers, portable highly sensitive spectrometers, multiwavelength photoacoustic imagers, due to novel methods of data analysis, such as the machine-learning methods of spectral analysis, and due to novel applications, such as the imaging of embryogenesis or monitoring of the cerebral oxygen metabolism. 

The purpose of this Special Issue is to provide an overview of recent advances in the methods of tissue imaging and characterization which benefit from using large numbers of optical wavelengths. Potential topics include but are not limited to novel methods and instrument designs, in vivo imaging and monitoring of the human and animal organs and embryos, biomedical optical guidance, detection and characterization of diseases, and molecular imaging.

Prof. Dr. Vladislav Toronov
Prof. Dr. Mamadou Diop
Prof. Dr. Angelo Sassaroli
Prof. Dr. Ilias Tachtsidis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Hyperspectral imaging
  • Near infrared spectroscopy
  • Biological tissue
  • Brain imaging
  • Oxygen metabolism
  • Oxygen saturation
  • Supercontinuum laser
  • Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy
  • Broadband optical spectroscopy of tissue
  • Multispectral tissue imaging
  • Diffuse optical tomography
  • Photoacoustic imaging
  • Molecular imaging
  • Fluorescence imaging

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Comparison of Optical Imaging Techniques to Quantitatively Assess the Perfusion of the Gastric Conduit during Oesophagectomy
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(16), 5522; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10165522 - 10 Aug 2020
Abstract
In this study, four optical techniques—Optical Coherence Tomography, Sidestream Darkfield Microscopy, Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging, and Fluorescence Angiography (FA)—were compared on performing an intraoperative quantitative perfusion assessment of the gastric conduit during oesophagectomy. We hypothesised that the quantitative parameters show decreased perfusion towards [...] Read more.
In this study, four optical techniques—Optical Coherence Tomography, Sidestream Darkfield Microscopy, Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging, and Fluorescence Angiography (FA)—were compared on performing an intraoperative quantitative perfusion assessment of the gastric conduit during oesophagectomy. We hypothesised that the quantitative parameters show decreased perfusion towards the fundus in the gastric conduit and in patients with anastomotic leakage. In a prospective study in patients undergoing oesophagectomy with gastric conduit reconstruction, measurements were taken with all four optical techniques at four locations from the base towards the fundus in the gastric conduit (Loc1, Loc2, Loc3, Loc4). The primary outcome included 14 quantitative parameters and the anastomotic leakage rate. Imaging was performed in 22 patients during oesophagectomy. Ten out of 14 quantitative parameters significantly indicated a reduced perfusion towards the fundus of the gastric conduit. Anastomotic leakage occurred in 4/22 patients (18.4%). At Loc4, the FA quantitative values for “T1/2” and “mean slope” differed between patients with and without anastomotic leakage (p = 0.025 and p = 0.041, respectively). A quantitative perfusion assessment during oesophagectomy is feasible using optical imaging techniques, of which FA is the most promising for future research. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Optimal Spectral Combination of a Hyperspectral Camera for Intraoperative Hemodynamic and Metabolic Brain Mapping
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(15), 5158; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10155158 - 27 Jul 2020
Abstract
Intraoperative optical imaging is a localization technique for the functional areas of the human brain cortex during neurosurgical procedures. These areas are assessed by monitoring the oxygenated (HbO2) and deoxygenated hemoglobin (Hb) concentration changes occurring in the brain. Sometimes, the functional [...] Read more.
Intraoperative optical imaging is a localization technique for the functional areas of the human brain cortex during neurosurgical procedures. These areas are assessed by monitoring the oxygenated (HbO2) and deoxygenated hemoglobin (Hb) concentration changes occurring in the brain. Sometimes, the functional status of the brain is assessed using metabolic biomarkers: the oxidative state of cytochrome-c-oxidase (oxCCO). A setup composed of a white light source and a hyperspectral or a standard RGB camera could be used to identify the functional areas. The choice of the best spectral configuration is still based on an empirical approach. We propose in this study a method to define the optimal spectral combinations of a commercial hyperspectral camera for the computation of hemodynamic and metabolic brain maps. The method is based on a Monte Carlo framework that simulates the acquisition of the intrinsic optical signal following a neuronal activation. The results indicate that the optimal spectral combination of a hyperspectral camera aims to accurately quantify the HbO2 (0.5% error), Hb (4.4% error), and oxCCO (15% error) responses in the brain following neuronal activation. We also show that RGB imaging is a low cost and accurate solution to compute Hb maps (4% error), but not accurate to compute HbO2 (48% error) or oxCCO (1036% error) maps. Full article
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