Special Issue "Biomedical Photoacoustic and Thermoacoustic Imaging"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Acoustics and Vibrations".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Yuanjin Zheng
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Associate Professor, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Block S2.2 - B2 - 46, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 Singapore, Singapore
Interests: photoacoustics; 3D imaging and display; acoustics
Dr. Fei Gao
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Assistant Professor, School of Information Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University, Shanhai, China
Interests: photoacoustic imaging; thermoacoustic imaging; medical device; biosensor
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biomedical imaging has been an essential tool in daily medical diagnostics. For more than 100 years, various biomedical imaging technologies have been developed to provide anatomical, functional and molecular information of internal organs, among which optical imaging and ultrasound imaging have been two major modalities. Being distinct in fundamental physics, optical imaging and ultrasound imaging have been explored by different research communities. In recent decades, the emergence of photoacoustic imaging (PAI) modality has opened the way for integrating optical and ultrasound merits, i.e., rich optical contrast and deep ultrasound resolution. PAI has experienced an exponential increase in both research and industrial communities. These achievements include but are not limited to: PA microscopy, PA tomography, PA endoscopy, PA intravascular probe, contrast-enhanced PAI, and related physics, system and algorithm designs.

The special issue of the journal Applied Sciences “Biomedical Photoacoustic and Thermoacoustic Imaging” aims to cover recent advances in the development of photoacoustic imaging, thermoacoustic imaging, optical imaging, acoustic imaging, and related imaging techniques that bridge the merits of optics/microwave and acoustics.

Dr. Yuanjin Zheng
Dr. Fei Gao
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Biomedical imaging
  • Photoacoustic imaging
  • Thermoacoustic imaging
  • Optical imaging
  • Ultrasound imaging
  • Acoustics
  • Biophotonics

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Article
Development of a Stationary 3D Photoacoustic Imaging System Using Sparse Single-Element Transducers: Phantom Study
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(21), 4505; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9214505 - 24 Oct 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 882
Abstract
Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an emerging label-free and non-invasive modality for imaging biological tissues. PAI has been implemented in different configurations, one of which is photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) with a potential wide range of applications, including brain and breast imaging. Hemispherical Array [...] Read more.
Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an emerging label-free and non-invasive modality for imaging biological tissues. PAI has been implemented in different configurations, one of which is photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) with a potential wide range of applications, including brain and breast imaging. Hemispherical Array PACT (HA-PACT) is a variation of PACT that has solved the limited detection-view problem. Here, we designed an HA-PACT system consisting of 50 single element transducers. For implementation, we initially performed a simulation study, with parameters close to those in practice, to determine the relationship between the number of transducers and the quality of the reconstructed image. We then used the greatest number of transducers possible on the hemisphere and imaged copper wire phantoms coated with a light absorbing material to evaluate the performance of the system. Several practical issues such as light illumination, arrangement of the transducers, and an image reconstruction algorithm have been comprehensively studied. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomedical Photoacoustic and Thermoacoustic Imaging)
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Article
A Feasibility Study of Photoacoustic Detection of Hidden Dental Caries Using a Fiber-Based Imaging System
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(4), 621; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8040621 - 17 Apr 2018
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2439
Abstract
In this paper, the feasibility of an optical fiber-based photoacoustic imaging system for detecting caries lesions inside a tooth is examined. Models of hidden caries were prepared using a pigment with an absorption spectrum similar to that of real caries lesions, and the [...] Read more.
In this paper, the feasibility of an optical fiber-based photoacoustic imaging system for detecting caries lesions inside a tooth is examined. Models of hidden caries were prepared using a pigment with an absorption spectrum similar to that of real caries lesions, and the occlusal surface of the model teeth containing the pigment was irradiated with laser pulses with a wavelength of 532 nm. An examination of the frequency spectra of the emitted photoacoustic waves revealed that the spectra from simulated caries lesions included frequency components in the range of 0.5–1.2 MHz that were not seen in the spectra from healthy parts of the teeth. This indicates that hidden caries can be detected via a photoacoustic imaging technique. Accordingly, an imaging system for clinical applications was fabricated. It consists of a bundle of hollow-optical fibers for laser radiation and an acoustic probe that is attached to the tooth surface. Results of ex vivo imaging experiments using model teeth and an extracted tooth with hidden caries lesions show that relatively large caries lesions inside teeth that are not seen in visual inspections can be detected by focusing on the above frequency components of the photoacoustic waves. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomedical Photoacoustic and Thermoacoustic Imaging)
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Article
An Efficient Compensation Method for Limited-View Photoacoustic Imaging Reconstruction Based on Gerchberg–Papoulis Extrapolation
Appl. Sci. 2017, 7(5), 505; https://doi.org/10.3390/app7050505 - 17 May 2017
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2329
Abstract
The reconstruction for limited-view scanning, though often the case in practice, has remained a difficult issue for photoacoustic imaging (PAI). The incompleteness of sampling data will cause serious artifacts and fuzziness in those missing views and it will heavily affect the quality of [...] Read more.
The reconstruction for limited-view scanning, though often the case in practice, has remained a difficult issue for photoacoustic imaging (PAI). The incompleteness of sampling data will cause serious artifacts and fuzziness in those missing views and it will heavily affect the quality of the image. To solve the problem of limited-view PAI, a compensation method based on the Gerchberg–Papoulis (GP) extrapolation is applied into PAI. Based on the known data, missing detectors elements are estimated and the image in the missing views is then compensated using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). To accelerate the convergence speed of the algorithm, the total variation (TV)-based iterative algorithm is incorporated into the GP extrapolation-based FFT-utilized compensation method (TV-GPEF). The effective variable splitting and Barzilai–Borwein based method is adopted to solve the optimization problem. Simulations and in vitro experiments for both limited-angle circular scanning and straight-line scanning are conducted to validate the proposed algorithm. Results show that the proposed algorithm can greatly suppress the artifacts caused by the missing views and enhance the edges and the details of the image. It can be indicated that the proposed TV-GPEF algorithm is efficient for limited-view PAI. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomedical Photoacoustic and Thermoacoustic Imaging)
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Review

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Review
Wavefront Shaping and Its Application to Enhance Photoacoustic Imaging
Appl. Sci. 2017, 7(12), 1320; https://doi.org/10.3390/app7121320 - 19 Dec 2017
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 2652
Abstract
Since its introduction to the field in mid-1990s, photoacoustic imaging has become a fast-developing biomedical imaging modality with many promising potentials. By converting absorbed diffused light energy into not-so-diffused ultrasonic waves, the reconstruction of the ultrasonic waves from the targeted area in photoacoustic [...] Read more.
Since its introduction to the field in mid-1990s, photoacoustic imaging has become a fast-developing biomedical imaging modality with many promising potentials. By converting absorbed diffused light energy into not-so-diffused ultrasonic waves, the reconstruction of the ultrasonic waves from the targeted area in photoacoustic imaging leads to a high-contrast sensing of optical absorption with ultrasonic resolution in deep tissue, overcoming the optical diffusion limit from the signal detection perspective. The generation of photoacoustic signals, however, is still throttled by the attenuation of photon flux due to the strong diffusion effect of light in tissue. Recently, optical wavefront shaping has demonstrated that multiply scattered light could be manipulated so as to refocus inside a complex medium, opening up new hope to tackle the fundamental limitation. In this paper, the principle and recent development of photoacoustic imaging and optical wavefront shaping are briefly introduced. Then we describe how photoacoustic signals can be used as a guide star for in-tissue optical focusing, and how such focusing can be exploited for further enhancing photoacoustic imaging in terms of sensitivity and penetration depth. Finally, the existing challenges and further directions towards in vivo applications are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomedical Photoacoustic and Thermoacoustic Imaging)
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Review
Photoacoustic Imaging in Oxygen Detection
Appl. Sci. 2017, 7(12), 1262; https://doi.org/10.3390/app7121262 - 04 Dec 2017
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 3198
Abstract
Oxygen level, including blood oxygen saturation (sO2) and tissue oxygen partial pressure (pO2), are crucial physiological parameters in life science. This paper reviews the importance of these two parameters and the detection methods for them, focusing on the application [...] Read more.
Oxygen level, including blood oxygen saturation (sO2) and tissue oxygen partial pressure (pO2), are crucial physiological parameters in life science. This paper reviews the importance of these two parameters and the detection methods for them, focusing on the application of photoacoustic imaging in this scenario. sO2 is traditionally detected with optical spectra-based methods, and has recently been proven uniquely efficient by using photoacoustic methods. pO2, on the other hand, is typically detected by PET, MRI, or pure optical approaches, yet with limited spatial resolution, imaging frame rate, or penetration depth. Great potential has also been demonstrated by employing photoacoustic imaging to overcome the existing limitations of the aforementioned techniques. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomedical Photoacoustic and Thermoacoustic Imaging)
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